Check out the TB2K CHATROOM, open 24/7               Configuring Your Preferences for OPTIMAL Viewing
  To access our Email server, CLICK HERE

  If you are unfamiliar with the Guidelines for Posting on TB2K please read them.      ** LINKS PAGE **



*** Help Support TB2K ***
via mail, at TB2K Fund, P.O. Box 71, Coupland, TX, 78615
or


PREP You have lost your place of residence. You have a tank of petrol in the car.....
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 40 of 56
  1. #1

    You have lost your place of residence. You have a tank of petrol in the car.....

    Say the economy has collapsed and you have been forced to hit the road.


    There are no jobs on the go.


    What would you do? What would you take with you?



    Me I would pack a tent, fishing gear and lots of seed for sprouting and head up or down the coast. I would have to find somewhere I could get fresh water from and set up camp. I would be hiding to get away with it

  2. #2
    Free spirit Andy Buth drowns in Micronesia, his paradise

    Waveney Ann MooreWaveney Ann Moore, Times Staff Writer

    Tuesday, November 30, 2010 11:29am




    About six months ago Buth, right, went to Micronesia where his childhood friend Gita Drew, left, was in the Peace Corps. They got engaged in September. She was on another island when he died.


    About six months ago Buth, right, went to Micronesia where his childhood friend Gita Drew, left, was in the Peace Corps. They got engaged in September. She was on another island when he died.



    Andy Buth found paradise. He had sought a place where he could live without money. Live off the land. Use his skills to hunt and fish. • He'd been a hunting guide in Montana and managed a chocolate factory in Alaska. In April, he landed in Micronesia. It was the happiest he'd ever been.


    He died on Oct. 15, at age 25. The cause of death is uncertain, but his body was recovered in about 45 feet of water, where he had been fishing. Island chiefs proclaimed a month of mourning and named the place where he died Andy Buth's Cove.

    His story, say those who loved him, was one of a youthful odyssey touched by troubles, but more often, brimming with adventure, fearlessness and caring.

    His dad, St. Petersburg resident Joseph Buth, prefers to refer to his son — who wore nipple rings and often walked barefoot — by his formal name, Andrew.

    "When he was 18, he decided not to go to college and that disappointed me a little bit and then I discovered that what he was following, that was much rougher and much more true to his soul,'' the elder Buth said by phone from Micronesia. "Andrew's kind of ideal was to find a place where there was no currency.''

    "He had this skill set,'' his mother, Tina Ellet, said. "He was a hunter in the States where there are fast-food drive-throughs. It was not a very easy fit in the United States."

    Andy was born in Daytona Beach and got his GED from Dixie Hollins High, where his father graduated. His parents divorced and he lived with his mother, sister, Lily, and brother, Chris, in Melbourne Village, and at times with his father and his wife, Karen Olson, in St. Petersburg.

    "My nickname for him was Gentle Giant,'' his mother said. "He was just the big kid with the kind, soft touch. Many a time, he went to battle for other people that weren't as physically strong.''

    Lily, 20, said she and her two brothers got tattoos with their three initials: ACE, for Andrew, Christian and Elizabeth. "That's just how close we were,'' she said.

    To Olson, Andy's stepmother who now lives in Plant City, Andy was her "bonus son.''

    "He would decide that something didn't make sense and he would live by it,'' she said. "He would walk everywhere barefoot and when we went to a restaurant, he would try to walk in barefoot. … Andy always had to do things his own way.''

    Ten members of the family traveled to the Micronesian outer island of Fais after receiving news of his death. He had been in Micronesia for about six months when he died. With childhood friend Gita Drew serving there in the Peace Corps, it seemed an opportune time to visit. He settled in quickly.

    "The culture is a very, very traditional Pacific culture. The women wear traditional handwoven skirts — lavalava — and no shirts. The men wear what we call loincloths. Their culture is all about respect and community and not a lot of outsiders come to these outer islands of Yap,'' said Drew, 25, who is at home in Melbourne Beach on leave.

    Andy won the islanders' admiration. In Woleai, where he first lived, he impressed the men with his diving skills. He later ended up on Fais when Drew was transferred there.

    "There is where he really excelled in fishing. He went out spear fishing with the men and he got to where he could dive 100 feet and just hold his breath. He was a fish,'' Drew said.

    "He was always making something. He loved to work, fishing, gardening, repairing houses, repairing fishing nets, building, clearing land, collecting coconuts. It was the perfect place for him, for me, for the two of us. We would go snorkeling together."

    Andy died while she was away on business on the island of Yap.

    "I didn't want to believe it. I just love him so much …,'' she said.

    They had gotten engaged in early September. "He made us rings actually that are made out of black pearl oyster shell. They were half black and half white, so they're just beautiful,'' she said.

    Andy had gone fishing by himself the day he died. When he hadn't returned by around 4 p.m., his host father and a couple of his fishing buddies launched a search.

    When they pulled him up, "he had fish on his line and one of them was half eaten,'' Drew said. "They brought him up and tried to do CPR, but he had been dead for a while."

    She said the method of fishing used on the island is to dive down to the ocean floor, wait for a fish and spear it. "They think that he shot the big fish and it was really strong and it surprised him and that he hit his forehead and he was instantly knocked out and killed,'' Drew said.

    Islanders were heartbroken and asked his family to bury him on Fais. "They had a funeral for him like he was one of their sons,'' his fiancee said.

    "He would write letters telling me how wonderful the people are,'' Joseph Buth said.

    He was buried on Nov. 2, overlooking the ocean. "It's like the perfect dream place to have your final resting place,'' Drew said.

    "He was always trying to find a place where you could live without money. He found that place where everybody told him didn't exist. He spent a lot of years trying to find himself, not knowing how, or knowing where. When he came to Micronesia, he was the happiest, happiest he had ever been. He finally found this paradise that he had been looking for.''

    Waveney Ann Moore can be reached at wmoore@sptimes.com or (727) 892-2283.


    http://www.tampabay.com/news/humanin...radise/1137231

  3. #3

    If you were to assume a life as a "beach bum", how would you do it to live most comfortably while interacting with society as little as possible?
    (self.TrueAskReddit)

    submitted 2 years ago by andydna

    A co-worker brought up the idea and the first thing I thought of was using crab/lobster traps for food, but I wanted to see what people could come up with for shelter, food, legality of living this way, etc.
    ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////




    Given that I more or less do live life this way, I can probably offer some advice.

    Look for the cheapest accomodation you can find.

    Backpacker hostels, caravan parks, camping grounds, national parks. There are plenty of options out there. If you go the national park route, you will probably have to stay mobile. Often places are legally forbidden from formally offering long term accomodation, but you can still work something out with the owners if you want to live there for a while.

    Make lots of friends, and keep your mobile phone handy.

    If you don't get rich in money, you are going to want to be rich in people. Learn the value of reciprocal trade. Cook dinner for people, and if they are decent, (which at least some are) they will do the same back.

    Look for commodities which you can informally use as alternative forms of currency.

    The obvious one is marijuana, (and/or other drugs) but staple foodstuffs with a long storage life (think rice and herbs/spices etc) also work. I've traded a couple of grams of weed for food and various other things before; it works.

    Learn how to eat cheaply.

    After rent, I live on around $10-$12 a day at times; and where I'm living, I get free Internet access as well. My staple diet is peanut butter, cheese, and alfalfa sandwiches, and blended fruit and vegetable juice. Cheap, quick, easy, and nutritious.

    Watch out for the cops.

    If you are semi or fully homeless, the police are not your friends. Avoid them as much as possible. Don't do things like pulling over onto the side of the road in plain sight to stay the night, without at least trying to hide the car and/or your entire campsite, because otherwise you risk getting moved on, or potentially arrested.

    Develop your diplomatic skills.

    Know when people are doing something serious which you need to genuinely respond to, and when they are simply being trivially annoying in the inevitable human way that people are. Ignore the latter; do not even acknowledge it verbally. If you can truly learn to do this, you will be universally loved.

    I have been living in my current room for 12 months now, and I can count the number of genuinely serious issues I've had with anyone on one hand. I recently heard that the owner was putting all long term residents of the place on three weeks of probation, but that I was exempt from that list. That felt really good.

    Never be violent, lie, or steal, and do not tolerate anyone else who does.

    I know three people where I am living who are heroin users, and I could not care less. They are all nice people. A person can take whatever drugs they want, and have sex with whoever or whatever they want, and I do not care and will not judge them negatively for doing so. I only have the three rules above; and anyone who breaks those, gets disowned and shunned, and that includes biological family. That leads to my next point.

    If you have any race or class prejudices, get rid of them.

    I've known bikies, stoners, junkies, and ex cons. As well as foreign backpackers, if you do the hostel circuit you will meet plenty of colourful types. In addition to my three rules above, two more minor rules are that I do not like being around alcohol, (because it and amphetamines are the only drugs I know of which make people violent, for the most part) and I also will not tolerate truly aggressive swearing.

    These are more minor rules because they are not iron clad; if someone is having a beer or cider for example and is not being aggressive, then I am fine with it, and if someone likewise swears periodically in conversation that is fine as well. I do not like every second word consisting of four letters, however, and I also do not like alcohol when it leads to aggression or violence.
    If you were to assume a life as a "beach bum", how would you do it to live most comfortably while interacting with society as little as possible? (self.TrueAskReddit)

    submitted 2 years ago by andydna

    ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

    rabbit 40 points 2 years ago

    I lived on the beach here in Florida for a few months. A friend bought me a sleeping bag for wet nights and I spent a few days a week "spange-ing" (asking for spare change at gas stations) for cigarette and beer money. For food I'd usually just shoplift at Publix or Wal-Mart, and once a week one of the gas station's pizza place gave me their leftover breads.

    I had a dog, too, to protect me from other would-be beach bums. I never had a problem with that but I'm not sure if that's due to my having the dog or not. Regardless, headed for good company.

    When I got quite a bit of spange together, I'd go and buy some hemp and beads from Wal-Mart and sell them up at the hotel beaches to tourists.

    I don't think that's a sustainable lifestyle, though. People start to recognize you or the weather changes, etc. It was fun as a teenager who had her middle finger raised at "the man", but honestly, I was just very lucky to only have had to be a beach bum for a short period of time. I imagine if I weren't so young, I wouldn't have been shown nearly as much kindness.

    I was homeless living out of a car once and it was easier. The beach bum thing is fun, but you're always exposed to the elements and it really wears on you.
    ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

    https://www.reddit.com/r/TrueAskRedd...beach_bum_how/

  4. #4
    it's why intelligent people buy themselves insurance while they can - it's called a BOL (Bug Out Land) and have their immediate needs met thru their BOB (Bug Out Bag) until they reach their prepped property ....

    anything else - you're just called a refugee
    Illini Warrior

  5. #5
    Life in Byron’s squatter camps
    Photo Rudiger Wasser. For more visit www.rudigerwasser.com.

    Photo Rudiger Wasser. For more visit www.rudigerwasser.com.

    Anna James

    The gypsy kids’ campground would be beautiful, if not for the debris.

    A baked-bean can, water bottle, and a dog bowl are scattered on the dirt among three deflated tents and piles of soiled blankets. There’s a pink massage claw, a tabloid magazine and liquor bottles.

    The squatter camps like this one in the hinterland surrounding Byron Bay are illegal, but easy to find; behind the main strip, Jonson Street, walk a few metres inland, and tents appear. Neon-green, foliage-topped rosewood trees join baby blue sky; the salty summer air steadies and waves tumble nearby.

    ‘Sometimes the police ask you to move on, only if you’re being disrespectful to nature and trashing the place,’ says 20-year-old Kai, who’s been living out here for three years.

    Kai, like the other people interviewed for this article, didn’t offer his last name, as illegal camping is punishable by fine, or worse — disdain from his peers for opening their secret world to the media.

    ‘At least someone is interested in us,’ says Kai, when approached for an interview.

    Kai is a typical Byron Bay gypsy kid; under 25, impassively homeless, and living in a tented community with his peers on the fringes of one of Australia’s richest towns.
    Photo Rudiger Wasser. For more visit www.rudigerwasser.com.

    Photo Rudiger Wasser. For more visit www.rudigerwasser.com.

    The name ‘gypsy kid’ is typically used by those who’ve never met them, professionals looking on from the other side of town. The kids refer to themselves as a ‘pack,’ ‘mob’ or ‘family.’

    Kai’s dark skin makes him stand out, a rarity in a predominately white town; his father is Maori, and his mother English.

    He sports a tuft of peroxide in his fringed hair, and a ripped sleeveless Hawaiian shirt. He’s shoeless, always. He could be an extra from the movie Point Break.

    Fearing police, the kids abandon camp at daybreak.

    ‘No-one’s at camp during the day, [police] can’t do nothing if they don’t see us with our tents,’ says Kai.

    ‘We’re like a little family. We share what we’ve got, and if someone shares with you, you share with them,’ he says.

    Travellers sometimes share their supply of weed and wine, a non-verbal exchange for companionship and accommodation in the dunes. ‘We get a lot of travellers,’ Kai says.

    The gypsy kids divide public opinion. The weekend before Christmas, a community enforcement officer was attacked in the dunes during a blitz on illegal camping. He sustained a black eye, facial cuts, and a broken dislocated thumb. Incidents like this fuel perception of the gypsy kids as a public safety issue.

    Divided opinion

    Many resent the strain they put on local resources like the Larder, which provides free food.

    ‘Modern-day gypsies just want a free ride,’ wrote Terry Gray on the Voice of Byron Facebook page. ‘Go book into a caravan park like everyone else and put money back into local businesses (not just the pubs and bottle shops). Stop being a burden on the welfare agencies (’cause it’s all about a free feed) and take the bloody rubbish with you.’

    Over the phone, Gray’s voice softens when he reveals that, at 50 years old, he was homeless. Until recently, Gray illegally squatted around Byron in a tent with his dog. He divides Byron’s homeless in two: ‘ones who choose that lifestyle, and ones who can’t genuinely find a place,’ reserving resentment toward ‘takers’ who live off the land, just as he did recently.

    ‘I’ve been struggling and homeless before and I’ve had to use some of the services around town, like the Neighbourhood Centre [Larder].’

    But others believe they’re just kids, pursuing a higher spiritual journey, for which Byron was built.

    Charlie is a 34-year-old former dental technician and empathises with the gypsy kids because he’s on an odyssey himself. Mid-2015, he left the corporate world in WA, his job, house and professional community, to join the protest against ‘insidious’ invasions of the rights of Indigenous Australians.

    ‘Some kids are on the streets because of drugs and alcohol, but a lot of them aren’t,’ Charlie says. ‘Some are using them recreationally and for spiritual reasons, like taking magic mushrooms. They’re not just getting out of their heads. They’re making a connection with the infinite.’

    https://www.echo.net.au/2016/01/life...quatter-camps/

  6. #6
    Well here in Australia I am told that unfixed home loan rates are going to go up like mad. Hundreds of thousands will end up on the street without anything.

    Still, have jobs but in one hell of a mess.


    However, some will have nothing.


    Anyway, what would you do if events forced you out onto the street?

  7. #7
    CC you are a wealth of info sometimes, and you always make me think.

    But I often wonder about you, the person. What makes you tick. You're the consummate prepper.

    The course to being a prep freak, like I am, is lifelong. For you it seems even deeper. Did you starve at some point? I have. I went without solid food for almost five days due to a poor financial position when younger. And that time of need indeed has shaped how I am about being prepped for "anything", especially having adequate food and water.

    Just pondering. I don't mean to be personal and apologize if I am. It's just interesting how we (prepper community) have walked different paths to arrive at basically the same place.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    British Columbia, Canada
    Posts
    12,901
    Yes, my sister just bought a house 2 months ago out of Adelaide SA and the mortgage rates have been going up since.....
    True North Strong and Free

  9. #9
    Never been yet in a situation where I could not eat. Many times I have had to start my life over again. I have traveled a lot and seen how many have to live. I have seen economies collapse overnight.

    I can see that life will change again and soon.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Tampa Bay, FL
    Posts
    1,464
    Quote Originally Posted by China Connection View Post
    Free spirit Andy Buth drowns in Micronesia, his paradise

    Waveney Ann MooreWaveney Ann Moore, Times Staff Writer

    Tuesday, November 30, 2010 11:29am




    About six months ago Buth, right, went to Micronesia where his childhood friend Gita Drew, left, was in the Peace Corps. They got engaged in September. She was on another island when he died.


    About six months ago Buth, right, went to Micronesia where his childhood friend Gita Drew, left, was in the Peace Corps. They got engaged in September. She was on another island when he died.



    Andy Buth found paradise. He had sought a place where he could live without money. Live off the land. Use his skills to hunt and fish. • He'd been a hunting guide in Montana and managed a chocolate factory in Alaska. In April, he landed in Micronesia. It was the happiest he'd ever been.


    He died on Oct. 15, at age 25. The cause of death is uncertain, but his body was recovered in about 45 feet of water, where he had been fishing. Island chiefs proclaimed a month of mourning and named the place where he died Andy Buth's Cove.

    His story, say those who loved him, was one of a youthful odyssey touched by troubles, but more often, brimming with adventure, fearlessness and caring.

    His dad, St. Petersburg resident Joseph Buth, prefers to refer to his son — who wore nipple rings and often walked barefoot — by his formal name, Andrew.

    "When he was 18, he decided not to go to college and that disappointed me a little bit and then I discovered that what he was following, that was much rougher and much more true to his soul,'' the elder Buth said by phone from Micronesia. "Andrew's kind of ideal was to find a place where there was no currency.''

    "He had this skill set,'' his mother, Tina Ellet, said. "He was a hunter in the States where there are fast-food drive-throughs. It was not a very easy fit in the United States."

    Andy was born in Daytona Beach and got his GED from Dixie Hollins High, where his father graduated. His parents divorced and he lived with his mother, sister, Lily, and brother, Chris, in Melbourne Village, and at times with his father and his wife, Karen Olson, in St. Petersburg.

    "My nickname for him was Gentle Giant,'' his mother said. "He was just the big kid with the kind, soft touch. Many a time, he went to battle for other people that weren't as physically strong.''

    Lily, 20, said she and her two brothers got tattoos with their three initials: ACE, for Andrew, Christian and Elizabeth. "That's just how close we were,'' she said.

    To Olson, Andy's stepmother who now lives in Plant City, Andy was her "bonus son.''

    "He would decide that something didn't make sense and he would live by it,'' she said. "He would walk everywhere barefoot and when we went to a restaurant, he would try to walk in barefoot. … Andy always had to do things his own way.''

    Ten members of the family traveled to the Micronesian outer island of Fais after receiving news of his death. He had been in Micronesia for about six months when he died. With childhood friend Gita Drew serving there in the Peace Corps, it seemed an opportune time to visit. He settled in quickly.

    "The culture is a very, very traditional Pacific culture. The women wear traditional handwoven skirts — lavalava — and no shirts. The men wear what we call loincloths. Their culture is all about respect and community and not a lot of outsiders come to these outer islands of Yap,'' said Drew, 25, who is at home in Melbourne Beach on leave.

    Andy won the islanders' admiration. In Woleai, where he first lived, he impressed the men with his diving skills. He later ended up on Fais when Drew was transferred there.

    "There is where he really excelled in fishing. He went out spear fishing with the men and he got to where he could dive 100 feet and just hold his breath. He was a fish,'' Drew said.

    "He was always making something. He loved to work, fishing, gardening, repairing houses, repairing fishing nets, building, clearing land, collecting coconuts. It was the perfect place for him, for me, for the two of us. We would go snorkeling together."

    Andy died while she was away on business on the island of Yap.

    "I didn't want to believe it. I just love him so much …,'' she said.

    They had gotten engaged in early September. "He made us rings actually that are made out of black pearl oyster shell. They were half black and half white, so they're just beautiful,'' she said.

    Andy had gone fishing by himself the day he died. When he hadn't returned by around 4 p.m., his host father and a couple of his fishing buddies launched a search.

    When they pulled him up, "he had fish on his line and one of them was half eaten,'' Drew said. "They brought him up and tried to do CPR, but he had been dead for a while."

    She said the method of fishing used on the island is to dive down to the ocean floor, wait for a fish and spear it. "They think that he shot the big fish and it was really strong and it surprised him and that he hit his forehead and he was instantly knocked out and killed,'' Drew said.

    Islanders were heartbroken and asked his family to bury him on Fais. "They had a funeral for him like he was one of their sons,'' his fiancee said.

    "He would write letters telling me how wonderful the people are,'' Joseph Buth said.

    He was buried on Nov. 2, overlooking the ocean. "It's like the perfect dream place to have your final resting place,'' Drew said.

    "He was always trying to find a place where you could live without money. He found that place where everybody told him didn't exist. He spent a lot of years trying to find himself, not knowing how, or knowing where. When he came to Micronesia, he was the happiest, happiest he had ever been. He finally found this paradise that he had been looking for.''

    Waveney Ann Moore can be reached at wmoore@sptimes.com or (727) 892-2283.


    http://www.tampabay.com/news/humanin...radise/1137231
    So, a person who chose to live a Communist, hunter gatherer lifestyle discovered that money is useful and Mother Nature's an unforgiving bitch.

    I'm okay with that.

    To the OP, I have no idea what I'd do except try to keep it from happening.

  11. #11
    I can imagine your travels and life in China was eye opening.

    Funny thing tho, you made me recheck my fishing gear the other day

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Central Iowa
    Posts
    6,263
    I'm not going anywhere. The house is paid off, and I know how to procure and prepare food during horrible economic times.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2,288
    Hope you find your water source ahead of time.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Last Resort View Post
    So, a person who chose to live a Communist, hunter gatherer lifestyle discovered that money is useful and Mother Nature's an unforgiving bitch.

    I'm okay with that.

    To the OP, I have no idea what I'd do except try to keep it from happening.
    How was he a Communist?

  15. #15
    Back in my twenties, I took several long distance multi day solo bicycle trips. I never knew where I'd be sleeping that night, and was far too cheap to get a motel.

    I kept a low profile, tucked in somewhere out of the way after dark, and left before daylight.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Tampa Bay, FL
    Posts
    1,464
    Quote Originally Posted by Faroe View Post
    How was he a Communist?
    No money, no possessions. He actively sought out a way of life where money would not be needed. He was looking for an ant farm. No common sense. No life. Sucks for his father, but oh well.

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Last Resort View Post
    No money, no possessions. He actively sought out a way of life where money would not be needed. He was looking for an ant farm. No common sense. No life. Sucks for his father, but oh well.
    Doesn't fit the definition.

    So, he would have been a better human being if he had burdened himself with student loans for some degree, signed a car loan on top of that, signed a lease for an apartment is some dreary city so he could spend forty hours a week in a cubicle paying the rent, utilities, loans, "health" insurance, social "security," fed/state taxes, and maybe put a bit away for his "golden" years. Yeah, that sounds like a plan. (Also sounds like an ant farm.)

    He choose freedom. I've read a few stories about guys like him. Too many die young. Inspiring anyway.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    tn
    Posts
    1,555
    Not everyone can afford a bug out location and not everyone has friends to invite them someplace.

    Dennis taught me in his used RV thread that a house on wheels has some very good points.

    Main bad points are that the gas milage is usually low and they can break down.

    But being able to move from the problems is worth a lot.

    I did not buy an rv, in my price range they needed a lot of work or had water damage.

    I bought a step van. I have the stuff in it to handle sleeping, cooking, and heating. Luxury would be being able to run the window ac unit to keep things cool.

    I have the tools to work on it and the knowledge to work on most of it as well.

    There are people living out of prius vehicles. And I am surprised to say they seem to be a very reliable and long lived vehicle. So there are a lot of options.

    I figure if I am looking at these options and considering them a reality then we will be in for a period of barter and I have some options there.
    working on unplugging.

  19. #19
    During a banking shutdown, a lot can happen.

    Start with a civil war between just about everyone over a hundred and one things.

    Having some kind of plan to get out of Dodge and some preps to make it work is not a stupid idea.

  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Meemur View Post
    I'm not going anywhere. The house is paid off, and I know how to procure and prepare food during horrible economic times.
    More than a few people are likely planning in that direction. A paid-off house, and if the tax man gets too aggressive, well, there are Ways and Means.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    N. Minnesota
    Posts
    9,602
    If you own your own property, it goes a long way toward NOT becoming a refugee. That's a worst case decision - maybe because of wildfire, chemical leak or a battlefield/enemy lines - and would likely only need to be temporary if you own your own chunk of dirt.

  22. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Faroe View Post

    He choose freedom. I've read a few stories about guys like him. Too many die young. Inspiring anyway.
    "Freedom's just another word for nothin' left to lose"

    jj

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    2,090
    I think those of us living in Michigan have a huge edge being surrounded by fresh water. Of course there will be other obstacles but at least it's better then being in a part of the country with absolutely no access to water. There are easy ways to find water in the ground if people would just do a little homework.
    "In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act." George Orwell

  24. #24
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    N. Minnesota
    Posts
    9,602
    Quote Originally Posted by vestige View Post
    "Freedom's just another word for nothin' left to lose"

    jj
    Haha. That's a sticky one and I don't know that I agree. Kris was young and broke when he wrote it.

  25. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by 2Trish View Post
    I think those of us living in Michigan have a huge edge being surrounded by fresh water. Of course there will be other obstacles but at least it's better then being in a part of the country with absolutely no access to water. There are easy ways to find water in the ground if people would just do a little homework.
    Amen; you could almost dig with a shovel and hit water in Michigan; I think our water table's ten, fifteen feet down.

  26. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by 2Trish View Post
    I think those of us living in Michigan have a huge edge being surrounded by fresh water. Of course there will be other obstacles but at least it's better then being in a part of the country with absolutely no access to water. There are easy ways to find water in the ground if people would just do a little homework.
    Water is an issue here in NM. It does rain on occasion. Obviously one can't haul much if bugging out, but we store a lot of it. We recently set-up some daisy-chain fill barrels off the gutter of one of the small sheds. Yesterday, we had a HUGE hailstorm/rainstom/windstorm. They worked!! All three barrels are full, and the seive on the entrance to the first, kept most of the junk out. Free water, and no chlorine.

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Where hiking boots go to die
    Posts
    9,385
    PREP You have lost your place of residence. You have a tank of petrol in the car.....
    Obvious answer: Car is new home, hopefully temporary. Bunking with friends can get old in a very few days.

    First step: Take care of paid for assets
    Pack food, water and absolute necessities for car camping in the car. Store what I can with friends or in storage unit. Sell whatever is left.

    Second Locate safe place to car camp:
    Talk to the police or sheriff and ask about local ordinances regarding sleeping in vehicles. Some municipalities do not allow this inside their boarders, some do. Asked politely, given the circumstances, the LE may even provide some possible safe and legal suggestions. Next head to the library for free internet and research Free Boondocking Sites in the immediate area if I don't have somewhere to head. There are websites dedicated to this and videos dedicated to making living out of a car more bearable. It does not look like a fun experience but many are being forced into it by circumstance. Many, not all, Wal-Marts allow RV's to camp free over night in their parking lots. That does not mean someone can make it a permanent residence. I would check with management while I was shopping there to find out if the local Wally World would tolerate me for the night as a car camper. It the answer is; "No.". I would leave my cart and whatever was in it at the service desk. Note: mice can and do get into storage units. Secure food in vermin proof containers. I found rice hidden in some strange places.

    Secure Pertinent Address
    Next step: Check out area for private mail forwarding stores. They may provide the equivilant of a PO Box at their store where I could recieve mail. This could provide a permanent address needed for work by some employers until I can get my feet back on the ground. Have my mail going to my old address stopped by the Post Office and forwarded to the store mailbox if available or consider renting a PO box if staying in the area and the private mailbox is not an option. Friends may be willing to provide their home address as a pertinent address but I prefer to be self sufficient. I also would have to find out if that was legal if not actually living there.

    Find a Job
    Small mom and pops still do the paper application but bigger employers require online employment application. As soon as I get a pay check get any and all belongings stored at friends place in private storage I control access to. As soon as possible get a roof back over my head and a real pertinent address.
    Last edited by Old Gray Mare; 04-13-2017 at 12:49 PM.
    Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it. - Mark Twain

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    HI
    Posts
    3,069
    Quote Originally Posted by China Connection View Post
    Well here in Australia I am told that unfixed home loan rates are going to go up like mad. Hundreds of thousands will end up on the street without anything.

    Still, have jobs but in one hell of a mess.


    However, some will have nothing.


    Anyway, what would you do if events forced you out onto the street?
    Think I would start making friends with an aborigine family, they might take you in as extended family, especially if you had a trade they needed like medical.

    In Hawaiii in the smaller islands, Hawaiians are self sufficient, a little rice (there are old wild rice patties)and they have plenty to eat with the Ocean as their refrigerator, mesquite wood for fire, pigs, deer, turkey, goats, sheep.but mostly what they can get from the sea. If you are accepted as a close friend of any family member, you are ohana, extended family, treated like their on, they will share with you everything.
    God Bless Us & God Bless America!

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Where hiking boots go to die
    Posts
    9,385
    A while back Kathy in Fl started a 30 day car camping bug out thread. It may provide some additional helpful information.

    Link to thread:
    http://www.timebomb2000.com/vb/showt...-Menu-Scenario
    Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it. - Mark Twain

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    HI
    Posts
    3,069
    Quote Originally Posted by Faroe View Post
    Water is an issue here in NM. It does rain on occasion. Obviously one can't haul much if bugging out, but we store a lot of it. We recently set-up some daisy-chain fill barrels off the gutter of one of the small sheds. Yesterday, we had a HUGE hailstorm/rainstom/windstorm. They worked!! All three barrels are full, and the seive on the entrance to the first, kept most of the junk out. Free water, and no chlorine.
    Have you tried digging a well? The Rio Grand runs through, mountains with snow means aquifers beneath. Should be water. The largest aquifer in AZ. is in the dessert near Holbrook, not many think of where water is underground, especially in dessert regions.
    God Bless Us & God Bless America!

  31. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    location, location...
    Posts
    5,416
    Free spirit Andy Buth drowns in Micronesia...

    ...She said the method of fishing used on the island is to dive down to the ocean floor, wait for a fish and spear it.
    Risking my life every time I need to eat, doesn't strike me as "Paradise".

    Settled somewhere warm, resting in a hammock with a pair of buxom young redheads, sipping a fruity alcoholic beverage (or a lightly peated single malt), and enjoying the scent of BBQ drifting through the air... THAT strikes me as "Paradise."

  32. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Night Owl View Post
    Have you tried digging a well? The Rio Grand runs through, mountains with snow means aquifers beneath. Should be water. The largest aquifer in AZ. is in the dessert near Holbrook, not many think of where water is underground, especially in dessert regions.
    We have a well on an out-of-town property we will be moving to eventually. The well was dependable until about two years ago. Can't remember the depth, but is now dry. This area sits on a huge aquifer, but everyone has to go down further then before. There are enormous alfalfa and horse farms around the area that suck up much of the water. We had the property doused, and will be drilling a much deeper well close by the original well. The water still has to be pumped up, so catching the rainwater off roofs is still an important backup.

    Also, the soil there is caliche. We already have pH 8.2 in town, off the tap. I'm not sure my beloved goldfish are going to manage in the well water. It needs to be tested first.

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Hill Country Texas
    Posts
    14,434
    You use the car to make short trips around the area, scavenging materials from places others have abandoned.

    Just think of how much of a household you can take in a car, not much.

    You use the materials you find for trade, survival and fortifying your house. You join a like-minded group of individuals in your AO for mutual support and defense, those not-like minded will probably leave one way or the other.
    You continue to strengthen your position and life becomes a 24x7 quest to survive.

    Eta: it might be fun to test my welding skills making abandoned cars into mad max type vehicles
    "Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other."
    -John Adams, America’s Second President

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Where hiking boots go to die
    Posts
    9,385
    Another note: I would not store a weapon in a car or vehicle left with easy access in a public area. IMHO better to lock up in private storage. If that was not an option I would consider burying in a safe place, well oiled and wrapped. There are videos on how to properly cash weapons using PVC pipe and PVC pipe caps.
    Last edited by Old Gray Mare; 04-13-2017 at 10:29 PM.
    Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it. - Mark Twain

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Where hiking boots go to die
    Posts
    9,385
    Many of the videos on living in a car, van or RV talk about the bottled propane "Buddy Heaters". I have never used one so I cannot attest to how safe, effective they are or not. This video discusses the pros and cons of the propane heater and directions on how they use them. One major con is the need for proper ventilation when using the propane heater so you don't suffocate. Some, not all, propane heaters have oxygen sensors and automatically shut off is there is a problem. They may or may not have a tip-over sensor that shuts the unit off if it tips over. The couple also stress the need for properly insulating the vehicle and it's windows and having enough warm blankets. - OGM


    Fair use:
    Van Life: How to Stay Warm While Living in A Van During Winter
    Published on Jan 23, 2017

    How to stay warm while living in a van. We have recently gotten a lot of questions about out insulation and how we stay warm during the colder months. Disclaimer- Some of the links in here are affiliate links, but we only share products we personally use and love!
    Link to source:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GlDb-ya0hCo

    For showering and staying clean this video suggests a $20 month gym membership. This allows the vlogers to travel from city to city stop in at membership gyms wash up and continue on traveling. They also discus helpful apps for travelers in similar circumstances and other things. - OGM

    Fair use:
    Van Life: Showering and Using The Bathroom
    Published on Mar 3, 2017

    A lot of people are wondering how we shower and use the bathroom in a van that has no bathroom or shower. We talk about how we make it work in this video while we are driving through Utah on our way to the next destination. This video goes through a simple day for us while we travel to a new spot to explore. We are driving from Arizona to Colorado.
    Link to source:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YnzbG4xQVt8
    Last edited by Old Gray Mare; 04-20-2017 at 07:25 AM.
    Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it. - Mark Twain

  36. #36
    Gee, and here I was working on how to change poo into a crop of maggots for chicken food or fishing bait or failing that direct food.


    Today I bought another sleeping bag at the Salvation Army Thrift Shop. Yep, I have a number of sleeping bags. I can double up etc. You can get good second-hand units for under ten dollars. Tents I have also. Same thrift shops you can pick them up. Tarps are good to cover the tents and make outside cover for rainy weather.

  37. #37
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Where hiking boots go to die
    Posts
    9,385
    Quote Originally Posted by China Connection View Post
    Today I bought another sleeping bag at the Salvation Army Thrift Shop. Yep, I have a number of sleeping bags. I can double up etc. You can get good second-hand units for under ten dollars. Tents I have also. Same thrift shops you can pick them up. Tarps are good to cover the tents and make outside cover for rainy weather.
    Not everyone here is blessed with a climate like Australia. The US does not have the same sense of enabling "Walk-about" in bedded in our culture. Some municipalities seem to go out of their way to make it illegal or uncomfortable for those involved.
    Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it. - Mark Twain

  38. #38
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    LaLa Land
    Posts
    4,862
    Quote Originally Posted by Old Gray Mare View Post
    Another note: I would not store a weapon in a car or vehicle left with easy access in a public area. IMHO better to lock up in private storage. If that was not an option I would consider burying in a safe place, well oiled and wrapped. There are videos on how to properly cash weapons using PVC pipe and PVC pipe caps.
    I know someone who pvc'd a bunch of money. Not only in the PVC tube, but in a steel coffee type thermos inside of it. Then sealed the Pvc cap to the top and buried it under a waterproof building. After he died his widow dug it up before selling the house and moving. The money was ruined. Some of it was unredeemable. She was able to salvage some but not all. Juz sayin'.. it might not be the safest way to store things.

  39. #39



    Christopher Knight’s camp in a remote section of Rome, Maine, where authorities believe he lived like a hermit for decades. Picture: AP/Maine Department of Public SafetySource:Supplied


    shortly after graduating took what little money he had and drove his 1985 Subaru Brat all the way up to Moosehead Lake, one of the most remote places in Maine. Once there, it was like the decision had been made for him.


    Knight found a clearing in the woods, set up a tent and devoted himself to the Greek philosophy of Stoicism. His pre- and post-holiday crime sprees, Knight said, were about “harvest time. A very ancient instinct.”

    He would plump himself up for Maine’s incipient brutal winters by gorging on booze and sugar-filled junk food. He stole barbecue tanks to melt snow for drinking water. He hunkered down in his lair for about six months, October through April, to avoid leaving so much as a footprint in the snow


    He said he slept 6.5 hours a day in winter, from 7:30pm to 2am, wrapped in multiple sleeping bags. Knight slept no more than that, fearing that his own sweat would turn to condensation and he’d freeze to death.

    “If you try and sleep through that kind of cold,” Knight said, “you might never wake up.”

    He had a two-burner camp stove, a gas line, a wash area, a bathroom consisting of two logs and a hole in the ground, and a bed (that stolen mattress!) with a fitted sheet and Tommy Hilfiger pillowcases. He painted his coolers and garbage cans in camouflage. He spent his days eating, cleaning and thinking, and his nights breaking and entering.

    He wasn’t proud of the latter, and agreed that he deserved arrest and trial.

    “Every time, I was conscious that I was doing wrong,” he told Finkel.

    “I took no pleasure in it, none at all.”

    Knight spent seven months in jail, paid $1500 in restitution, yet his greatest punishment is ongoing: re-entering society and adhering to its mores. He moved back in with his mother, and his brother gave him a job at his scrap-metal recycling plant. He knows to return to the woods would be to return to crime, but his longing is visceral and spiritual: “You’re just there,” he says. “You are.”

    http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/rea...4a191a7999b8ec

  40. #40
    I have lived in under 17 c in South Korea. Not recommending it or anything. However, this could go on for an awfully long time. So one should work out something that can be done long term. If you have tents within tents etc things will hold temperature better.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts


NOTICE: Timebomb2000 is an Internet forum for discussion of world events and personal disaster preparation. Membership is by request only. The opinions posted do not necessarily represent those of TB2K Incorporated (the owner of this website), the staff or site host. Responsibility for the content of all posts rests solely with the Member making them. Neither TB2K Inc, the Staff nor the site host shall be liable for any content.

All original member content posted on this forum becomes the property of TB2K Inc. for archival and display purposes on the Timebomb2000 website venue. Said content may be removed or edited at staff discretion. The original authors retain all rights to their material outside of the Timebomb2000.com website venue. Publication of any original material from Timebomb2000.com on other websites or venues without permission from TB2K Inc. or the original author is expressly forbidden.



"Timebomb2000", "TB2K" and "Watching the World Tick Away" are Service Mark℠ TB2K, Inc. All Rights Reserved.