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Food Bread Recipes
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Thread: Bread Recipes

  1. #1

    Bread Recipes

    I posted in the wrong place (homesteading) so Ill say it again...I just bought some Pullman bread pans and want to start making my own breads again. I also bought bread bags for freezing so anyone have some great bread recipes you care to share

  2. #2
    Melodi's Basic Bread

    (you can make this in a bread baker or just use it to knead - which is what I do or knead by hand).

    1 3/4 Cup liquid (water, buttermilk, juice, regular milk should be scalded) - if using eggs include as part of liquid (use up to five or six eggs for egg bread)

    to

    5 to 5 1/2 cups flour (use up to 1/2 whole grain without disturbing recipe)

    1 tsp salt

    1 tablespoon yeast

    1 to 3 tablespoons sugar (any kind); honey or other REAL sweetener (this is to make the yeast bloom so use at least 1 tsp of sugar even for low sugar bread)

    1 to 3 tablespoons oil (olive, corn, butter, coconut etc - experiment)

    In my bread baker you add the 1 tbs of yeast to 1 to 3 tablespoons sugar; 5 cups flour, 1 tsp salt on top then add the liquid and/or liquid egg combination

    To make by hand you would proof the yeast in a smaller bowel with about 1/4 cup of the liquid and the sugar for 10 minutes

    Then put in a larger bowel with the the flour, salt and liquid to knead...you can also mix about 2 cups of the flour, the yeast and the sugar ahead of time (even overnight) to "proof it" and give it extra flavor - wait 24 hours and it becomes sour dough.


    This is all basically a liquid dry ratio that will vary a bit with your climate, time of day etc but it is pretty much

    2 cups flour to 3/4 cup liquid (small loaf)

    4 Cups flour to 1 1/2 cup liquid (2 med loaves)

    5 Cups flour to 1 3/4 cup liquid (2 larger loaves)

    6 cups flour to 2 cups liquid (2 extra large loaves and/or 1 lg loaf and a pan of rolls)

    If you use all whole grain flour, you will probably need 1/8 to 1/2 cup extra liquid.

    If making egg bread or a bread with a lot (say 1/2 cup) butter or honey you will need to adjust again - extra fat or sweetener will create a richer but slower rising bread; I always add at least 1/3 cup of water or milk to my egg bread, rather than just all eggs.

    You can add fruits, nuts and seeds towards the end of the kneading process (by hand or by bread baker).

    Let dough rise at least once, twice is better (although if you like denser bread using only one rising can help - my husband prefers this; 3 times is about maximum - that would be twice in the bowel and once in the bread pan).

    Whole grains, heavy butter breads and highly sweet breads will take longer to rise and usually not rise as high but that's normal; sometimes the best bread may be the simplest - flour-water-salt-yeast-pinch of sugar; but I usually add oil because non-oil bread is only fresh one-day.

    The difference between Italian and French bread is just the olive oil; the French use no oil but make bread every day and the Italians use olive oil (and in the North Butter) to keep the bread longer.

    Hope this helps, I have found the "formula" of liquid to dry very useful; again some days it isn't exact but it gets you pretty close.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Ficatta Bread

    7 cups Flour
    4 cups warm water
    2 packages yeast
    Rise 1-2 hours
    400 convection oven 20-21. Mins. Double time for conventional baking oven

    Make 6 loafs, you can freeze until you need

    You can add olives, herbs, cheeses to this recipe.
    Last edited by Night Owl; 03-02-2017 at 03:05 AM.
    God Bless Us & God Bless America!

  4. #4
    Here is the best, most foolproof 100% whole wheat bread recipe I've found. I don't have "directions"... it was originally a bread machine recipe. Just follow the basic steps for making bread dough, and don't expect it to be completely "smooth and easy to handle" when it's done... almost all whole wheat dough tends to be somewhat sticky.

    Summerthyme


    Honey Whole Wheat Bread

    1 cups water
    2 tsp salt
    1/3 cup honey
    4 cups whole wheat flour
    cup vital wheat gluten (OPTIONAL- not necessary with good whole wheat flour)
    2 tblsp butter
    2 tblsp dry milk (OR just replace cup of the water with whole milk)
    1 tsp active dry yeast

    ================================================== ===============================

    For an endless number of really good, PROVEN recipes, go to www.kingarthurflour.com and search through their recipe section. Unlike many places on the 'net which have interesting recipes, these have all been tested and WORK!

    Also, if you like the softer crumb of "storebought" bread, toss in a baked potato, or 2/3rds cup (about) leftover mashed potatoes into any recipe you want.

    I rarely use a recipe at all these days... I generally start with a quart of fresh milk (scalded... something in fresh raw milk inhibits yeast growth a bit), some cream or butter, a couple eggs, 1/2 cup of some sweetener- honey from our hives or maple syrup, 1 tablespoon of yeast and 1 tsp of salt. Then I add as much flour, generally a mix of whole wheat and white, to make a suitable dough. I'll often toss in some flax seed, 6 grain cereal, rolled oats, or whatever else suits my fancy at the time. These amounts generally make about 4 nice loaves, and won't fit into a mixer bowl unless you have a BIG one... I make a "sponge" with all the ingredients except the flour and grains, add enough flour to make a batter, then divide it into two bowls and go from there. I have a 6 quart Kitchenaid mixer, FWIW.

    When I was feeding four teenagers, and was making 12 loaves every week, I generally made a big sponge in the mixer. Then I poured it into a 5 gallon pail, added flour until I couldn't stir it anymore, and then dumped it out onto a large pastry cloth (homemade from 10 ounce duck fabric- it covered the entire kitchen table) and kneaded in flour until it was done. There was no way I was going to make 6 batches of 2 loaves each! LOL!

    Summerthyme

  5. #5
    This was my recipe when I first started making bread. It pretty "idiot" proof, even my 10 years olds make it now by themselves.

    Amish White Bread

    2 Cups Warm Water (110 degrees)
    2/3 cup white sugar (you can use half of this and it works well)
    1 1/2 tablespoon active dry yeast
    1 1/2 teaspoons salt
    1/4 cup oil
    6 cups bread flour (or 6 cups regular flout with 4 tablespoons gluten added)

    In a large bowl, dissolve sugar in warm water and then stir in yeast. Allow to proof until yeast resembles a creamy foam.

    Mix salt and oil into yeast. Mix in flour one cup at a time. Knead dough on a lightly floured surface until smooth. Place in a well oiled bowl. Turn dough to coat. Cover with a damp cloth. Allow to rise until doubled, about an hour.

    Punch dough down. Knead for a few minutes and divide in half. Shape into loaves and place into well oiled 9 x 5 inch loaf pans. Allow to rise for 30 minutes or until dough rises 1 inch above pans.

    Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes. (Bread will sound hollow when tapped on.)

    ==================

    You can substitute honey for the sugar, just adjust the liquid if you want. I also make this with half whole wheat and half white flour. Again just add a little more water if needed. (I usually don't, but bread baking is very location specific. )

  6. #6
    These sound wonderful! Thank you SO much

  7. #7
    I posted to your other thread, but look at the King Arthur flour site under "pain design mie" recipes, for your pans if they have lids.

    Summerthyme

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by summerthyme View Post
    I posted to your other thread, but look at the King Arthur flour site under "pain design mie" recipes, for your pans if they have lids.

    Summerthyme
    Ok..will do!

  9. #9
    That should be "pain de mie"!!

    Darned auto Correct!

    Summerthyme

  10. #10
    LOL...King Arthur knew what you meant & took me to the recipes despite the misspelling
    Thanks for that too! I am hoping to get some bread baking done tomorrow in my new pans!

  11. #11
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    I'm going to bake these today. They look delicious and close to the real thing.

    KETO DINNER ROLLS

    These Keto Dinner Rolls are soft, pillowy, and absolutely delicious! Based on the Fat Head Dough recipe you just can't go wrong.

    Prep time: 5 minutes

    Cook time: 20 minutes

    Serves: 12

    Ingredients:

    8 ounces cream cheese
    3 cups shredded mozzarella cheese
    4 eggs
    1/4 cup baking powder
    1 1/3 cups almond meal
    1 tablespoon unsalted butter

    Instructions:

    Preheat the oven to 400 F
    In a small pot over low heat melt the cream cheese and mozzarella together.
    Add the melted cheeses to a large bowl along with the baking powder, almond meal, and eggs.
    Melt the butter over low heat in a 10" cast iron skillet
    Divide the dough into 22 balls and place in the skillet. Bake for 20-25 minutes until fluffy, golden brown, and cooked through.

    https://www.castironketo.net/blog/keto-dinner-rolls

    I found this on Pinterest, they have tons of keto food recipes. I haven't found one yet that turned out to be a dud.

    https://www.pinterest.com/pin/196047...71050/?lp=true

    PS, the above recipe calls for 1/4 cup of baking powder. The author of the recipe verified that 1/4 cup is correct.

  12. #12
    Oh, let us know how they turn out! While I can eat all the wheat I want, I often cook for people who can't and these look lovely!

    In Ireland, ground almonds are everywhere (almost ground to almond flour) so getting that is easy; also my housemate makes the most wonderful traditional German Christmas cookies from all ground almonds and they are wonderful - they are traditionally made without wheat.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  13. #13
    Hmmm, just saw the 1/4 cup of baking powder, if they have a nasty taste; I would cut it down to 1 tablespoon but if the author verified it then worth trying once again, let us know.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Melodi View Post
    Oh, let us know how they turn out! While I can eat all the wheat I want, I often cook for people who can't and these look lovely!

    In Ireland, ground almonds are everywhere (almost ground to almond flour) so getting that is easy; also my housemate makes the most wonderful traditional German Christmas cookies from all ground almonds and they are wonderful - they are traditionally made without wheat.
    They turned out wonderful! I used a muffin tin instead of the cast iron pan. I also tweeked the recipe. I added in 1 tsp of vanilla, 1/3 cup of Swerve (stevia mix), and 2 tsp of pumpkin pie spice. DH liked them. today I'm going to make them again but add in garlic powder, then top them with softened butter with Parmesan cheese. Bake them at 350 degrees (NOT @ 400 like the recipe calls for), for about 20-25 minutes. Also, if you use the muffin tin, spray the tin with cooking oil or butter each cup. You can also use the Fat boy Dough recipe for pizza. I prefer the cauliflower crust recipe. I posted that recipe on the Keto thread somewhere here at TB. I've made it several times and each time it's good!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Melodi View Post
    Hmmm, just saw the 1/4 cup of baking powder, if they have a nasty taste; I would cut it down to 1 tablespoon but if the author verified it then worth trying once again, let us know.
    Yes, the author of the recipe verified 1/4 cup of baking powder. You can taste it but it's not obnoxious. The baking powder is what gives the rolls the rise.

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Bardou View Post
    Yes, the author of the recipe verified 1/4 cup of baking powder. You can taste it but it's not obnoxious. The baking powder is what gives the rolls the rise.
    OK, I can see that; I'd just be afraid the soda taste would be overpowering (happens over here if you use the local bread soda or baking powder; which is why I make my own baking powder from cream of tartar and American baking soda).
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Melodi View Post
    OK, I can see that; I'd just be afraid the soda taste would be overpowering (happens over here if you use the local bread soda or baking powder; which is why I make my own baking powder from cream of tartar and American baking soda).
    I just made these again today, and the baking powder is not over powering. I divided the dough into `1/4 cup and placed them in a muffin tin (greased). I added garlic powder to the dough, and DH ate 4 of them! I had 2 and I say they are really good. Next time I'll add stevia and pumpkin pie spice to the dough to make cinnamon type keto muffins. This recipe is the closest I have found so far to actually tasting like dinner rolls. Also, I baked them at 350 degrees for 15 minutes. If you think about it, 1/4 cup of baking powder for about 14 muffins/rolls is not much at all per muffin. I use the aluminum free baking powder too.

  18. #18
    That is great news! - Thanks
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

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