Check out the TB2K CHATROOM, open 24/7               Configuring Your Preferences for OPTIMAL Viewing
  To access our Email server, CLICK HERE

  If you are unfamiliar with the Guidelines for Posting on TB2K please read them.      ** LINKS PAGE **



*** Help Support TB2K ***
via mail, at TB2K Fund, P.O. Box 24, Coupland, TX, 78615
or


FARM Any here with personal experience in AEROPONICS gardening?
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 40 of 41
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    S. Texas
    Posts
    9,894

    Any here with personal experience in AEROPONICS gardening?

    Seen a lot of YouTubes, read a lot, would be interested in hands on experiences of any who have actually tried
    doing it and can share good/bad/ugly compared to more traditional gardening and/or hydroponics.

    Mostly interested in its utility for desert region with no good soil and minimal water for year round prepper food
    production in a small family greenhouse yet to be designed specifically for aeroponic food production.

    Greenhouse should easily keep it warm enough with the mild winters, bigger challenge is selectively shading and
    somewhat cooling/humidifying via evaporation cooling in very hot dry desert summers. My initial interest was the
    minimal footprint that means smaller, thus more easily, hot climate controlling challenges in smallest greenhouse
    still big enough to do job.

    Besides your aeroponics experience and regardless where it has been, would also be interested in your opinion of
    the utility of aeroponics specifically for hot/dry deserts utilizing a somewhat climate controlled greenhouse, too.

    Thanks,
    Shane
    Last edited by shane; 06-12-2016 at 02:10 PM.

    THE GOOD NEWS ABOUT NUCLEAR DESTRUCTION!
    WHAT TO DO IF A NUCLEAR DISASTER IS IMMINENT!
    When An ill Wind Blows From Afar! (Overseas Fallout)

    "A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them;
    the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences."
    - Proverbs 22:3

  2. #2
    Can't answer any of your questions but I wonder how an under ground green house would work in your climate.

  3. #3
    Well, I do live in the desert.

    Are you talking about the Kratchy (spell?) method where the roots adapt as the water line goes down in the vessel, or the method with a mister in the bucket? I tried the first one this spring with several lettuces in gallon containers. no luck, but it was just one try.

    Honestly, was rather a PITA, and as I recall, you are supposed to use special ferts (which I didn't...just another thing to buy.)

    I have good results in blazing heat with wicking pots set in a very shallow (1/2" to 1") water. They conserve water, and are trouble free. Also, cheap and easy to make. I pretty much do everything from stashes of junk - scrap lumber, scrap plastic, scrap fencing, old pallets, free WM pastry buckets, my own yard soil and compost, and old cinderblocks.

    Some shade above is good too. If you want more info, I'll elaborate.

  4. #4
    I like my greenhouse, but it is not where I grow or start most of our food. The greenhouse is cattle panel walls, and PVC hoops for the roof. Plastic sheeting goes over that, but I took it down earlier this month, and am just using canvas tarp for shades. NOT perfect, but works ok, and was cheap. It actually makes a nice setting for some ornamental goldfish and perennial plants I've had in there for years.

    Here is what I do for spaces out in the sun: (Elaboration of the above post; wish the computer would just let me DRAW a diagram!)
    Base and pool:
    Get two sort of matching rather heavy pallets in fairly good shape. Get five cinderblocks. I prefer 8"X8"X8", but whatever will work. Set down blocks; one for each corner, and one in the center. They should be mostly level. Thin scrap wood bits can help. set the pallets on this, so you have a low table of sorts, supported by five feet. You need that center block to help support all the weight, or the pallets will eventually bow in the middle. Find four lengths of 2X4 (or similar) that are about the length of each side of the pallets, minus a little bit. Make a square frame with them that will fit on the top of the pallets. You are framing a shallow pool. Find some scrap cardboard to line the bottom and span the spaces between the slats in the top pallet. Get a length of plastic sheeting that doesn't appear to have any holes or tears, and use this as a water proof liner for your pool.

    Roof:
    Find four long lengths (I use 65") of lightweight lumber - or straight branches. Fix each one as an upright to each corner of the top pallet. I use screws. These are the poles to support your roof. I use scrap 2X4 wire fencing for the top "hat". if you fold the ends down, you get more stability. you can use more scrap lumber to give this rigidity. This hat goes on top. I usually tie it to the posts with twine. I cut 6' leghts or so of Chinese Elm shubbery from the vacant lot across the street and use that for the shade. Just pile it up on top there, and tie down with some twine. You can also use old curtains, blankets etc. but the wind chatches them, and at that point, "rustic" runs into "trashy," and the place starts looking like Juarez.

    Pots:
    I use free WM pastry buckets. They last about two years before becoming dangerously brittle. I drill 1/4" holes all over the bucket. You want it to breathe. Drill out about a 3/4" hole in the center of the bottom. Your wick goes here. I use old tube socks - you want some synthetic in the fabric. All cotton rots out too fast. Fill the buckets. Filling with a good mix is the trickiest part. Plants won't do well in compost that isn't perfectly finished. Yard soil is very heavy, and can get mucky, but mostly works. I mix in with lots of old bark and wood chips. The best performing buckets are always the ones filled LAST year. Use the lids, you cut a hole in the center for the plant to emerge out the top. For some buckets, I fill with lava rock and just some soil on top. Make sure in this case, your sock wick extends most of the way up inside the pot. (You only need a few inches of sock wick coming out the bottom.) The pots with gravel are labeled, so they get the best water from the fish tanks. These post have good root aeration, but low nutrient levels on their own. So far, so good with these pots, but you do have to buy the lava rock. The upside here, is that you now have a good excuse to set up more fish.

    ________
    Hope this is all clear.
    Last edited by Faroe; 06-12-2016 at 04:15 PM.

  5. #5


    http://www.treehugger.com/green-arch...ear-round.html


    /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

    Foliar Feeding
    This article is reprinted here with permission of Maximum Yield magazine. An excellent article from an excellent publication! - Professor Hydro
    Hydroponic Foliar Fertilization
    By Dr. Lynette Morgan

    The most commonly used method of hydroponic plant fertilization is through a nutrient solution applied to the root zone of the crop. While plant root systems are in the most part efficient at absorbing mineral nutrients, certain conditions can prevent optimal uptake rates of some of the elements plants require. When plants are stressed for some reason, have suffered root death or damage, are showing a nutrient deficiency or are being established from cuttings, then foliar feeding becomes a particularly useful method of nutrient application. Foliar feeding, provides nutrients through the foliage of the plant which has the ability to absorb and translocate certain minerals within plant tissues and this is a technique which growers can use in many situations.

    Benefits of Foliar Fertilization
    In soilless systems such as hydroponics, many nutrient interactions can occur within the root zone which makes it difficult for the plant to absorb certain minerals. Even well run hydroponic systems can become deficient in nutrients - either because of nutrient depletion, antagonism between certain elements, or due to elements becoming 'bound' and therefore unavailable for plant uptake. Imbalances in the combination of nutrients, pH levels which are too high or low for maximum plant uptake and poor physical properties of the media surrounding the root zone, including oxygen starvation are more common in soilless systems than many growers realize. Furthermore, elements such as iron, an essential trace element, can not only be prone to becoming unavailable for plant use at moderate to high pH levels, but uptake by the plant can also be severely limited under certain environmental conditions such as cool temperatures. Iron chlorosis in many crops which are overly stressed by low temperatures can be a common problem where root uptake is the only source of iron for the plant.

    Any situation which damages the root system or restricts its growth, development or physical process such as respiration affects the uptake of minerals. Plant pathogens such as fusarium pythium and phytophthora can not only rapidly destroy a crop, but low, less damaging levels can restrict function of the root zone to the point where mineral uptake is affected. While the crop may not show signs of severe infection, mineral and water uptake can be restricted and therefore crop yields and quality are affected. Other plant stress conditions such as anaerobic conditions in the root zone where oxygen is deficient, can limit nutrient uptake, with trace elements such as iron often affected to the greatest degree. Any other condition which stresses the plant - temperature stress, high or excessively low humidity levels, lack of light, high radiation levels, high plant densities, presence of pests or disease, will affect the efficiency of the root system in taking up mineral elements. These conditions are common and occur in many growing systems from time to time without the grower even realizing that plant growth and mineral uptake is being limited in some way. It is under these types of situations that foliar feeding has its greatest advantage. Since plant stress is dependent on a number of factors --- many are environmental, which growers have limited control over, foliar fertilization provides an 'insurance policy' against yield and quality loss from limitations in root mineral absorption and transportation.

    The Process of Foliar Fertilization
    Most leaves have stomata either only on the underside or on both sides of the leaf which enable gas to be exchanged for photosynthesis and respiration as well as releasing water vapor in stomatal transpiration. The leaf with its epidermis can also function as an organ that absorbs and excretes water and substances which may be dissolved in it.

    Since foliar absorption is limited because of the relative barrier of the cuticle it is not possible to solely feed plants via the leaves. For this reason the most effective use of foliar fertilization is as a rapid and effective method of supplying the micro nutrients. It can, however also be used to satisfy acute needs with lower concentrations of macronutrients and biuret-free urea is often used to supply nitrogen via the leaves.

    Foliar Nutrient Application
    One very important criterion of the effectiveness of nutrient sprays is the rate at which the foliar applied nutrients are absorbed by the leaves and translocated within the plant. The uptake of nutrients is further affected by a number of interacting factors of which only part are known at the current time - these are shown in Table 1.

    It would be difficult to ensure that all of these factors shown in Table 1, are optimal for foliar feeding at any one time, but some are more important than others. The use of a good quality, non ionic wetting or sticking agent is vital for foliar feeding. Wetting agents are necessary to ensure the adherence of droplets on difficult to wet leaves as well as assisting with the absorption of the fertilizer solution into the plant tissue.

    The foliar fertilizer solution should then be applied as a fine mist until 'run off' so that the entire leaf surface is wetted. The time of day when the solution is applied is also important. Spraying early in the morning, while it is light, but temperatures are still cool, or in the evening is best and conditions that allow the leaf to dry rather than stay wet for an extended length of time is also important to consider. Foliar solutions should not be applied during hot, bright conditions, if the plants are wilting or under water/osmotic stress as the plants stomata are likely to be closed making application ineffective.

    Foliar feeding can by carried out on a regular, weekly basis, or can be limited to the times when the crop comes under high nutrient demand such as early fruit set and heavy fruit loading. Often the greatest response to foliar feeding will occur during the active growth phases of plants (period of exponential growth). During these active growth stages, leaves show a particularly high efficacy for absorbing nutrients.

    If a period during which the plants have difficulty in absorbing nutrients via the root system should coincide with a period when there is a particularly vigorous demand for nutrients, the result will be a significant loss in yield potential, without the grower seeing any visible signs of deficiency. Under such conditions foliar fertilization can give particularly impressive results.

    Table 1 Influences determining the efficacy of foliar nutrient sprays
    PLANT ENVIRONMENT SPRAY SOLUTION
    Curricular wax

    Temperature

    Concentration
    Epicuticular wax

    Light

    Application rate
    Age of the leaf

    Photo period

    Application technique
    Stomata

    Air movement

    Wetting agent
    Guard cells

    Humidity

    pH
    Leaf hairs

    Drought

    Polarity
    Adaxial leaf side

    Time of day

    Hygroscopicity
    Abaxial leaf side

    Osmotic potential of root

    Sticking ability
    Leaf Turgor

    Nutrient stress

    Sugars
    Surface moisture (dew etc)

    Nutrient ratio
    Cation exchange capacity

    Carriers, penetrates
    Nutritional status of the plant

    Humectants
    Cultivar

    Growth stage


    The Role of Foliar Fertilization in Hydroponic Crop
    While hydroponic crops may appear to be supplied with optimal nutrition via a well balanced and formulated nutrient, they still benefit from the application of foliar fertilizers. Studies have shown that hydroponic crops such as capsicum, treated with a micro nutrient foliar applied solution, had an increase in fruit yield over control plants and also an increase in the compound capsaicin in the fruit tissue. Hydroponically cultivated potato plants also showed similar results. Potato plants given foliar fertilization treatments with a micro nutrient solution not only had a greater tuber harvest, but also higher dry matter of the whole plants. Rockwool grown tomato crops have shown both yield and fruit quality improvements when given a weekly foliar feed of a micro nutrient complex. These results would also be expected on a number of hydroponic crops with similar nutrient requirements and thus the process of foliar fertilization is a cultivation technique that should be considered as more than just a 'quick fix' for mineral deficiency symptoms.

    http://www.simplyhydro.com/foliar_feeding.htm

  6. #6
    Issue 05: Aeroponics

    Story Title: Aeroponics
    Author: Steven Carruthers

    Aeroponics is the most recent development in hydroponic methods, and one that has gained much publicity over recent years. It is defined by the International Society for Soiless Culture as a system where roots are continuously or discontinuously in an environment saturated with fine drops (a mist or aerosol) of nutrient solution.” The method requires no substrate and entails growing plants with their roots suspended in a deep air or growth chamber, with the roots periodically atomised with a fine mist of nutrients. Since their inception some 30 years ago, it is fair to say that aeroponic techniques have proved very successful for propagation, but have yet to prove themselves on a commercial scale. Aeroponics is also widely used in aboratory studies of plant physiology. Both the University of Arizona and Purdue University use aeroponic cultivation techniques to research controlled environment life support systems to be used in space stations of the future, and to support visitors to Mars.

    The first aeroponic system was developed at the University of Pia in Italy by Dr Franco Massantini, which led to the development of the colonna di coltura. This consisted of an aeroponic pipe supporting three relatively small cultivation trays fitted with sprinklers and covered with polystyrene lids.

    Although several plant types were grown successully, it proved to be expensive. The system was modified to a vertical layout, whereby crops were cultivated in a multi-layered system. A zinc-coated metal frame supported two, three, four and five vertical levels of channels. Plants were arranged in the channels, covered with dark plastic film to protect plant roots from light. Seedlings were then inserted in the film at suitable distances apart. More recent units use vertical PVC pipes with strawberry cultivars the usual crop grown.

    The Advantages
    Excellent aeration is the main advantage of aeroponics. Trials imply an important relationship between low water level and increased air space – the importance of oxygen in supporting the intensive metabolic processes associated with root formation and subsequent growth is well recognised.

    For propagation purposes, aeroponics is well proven. Experiments in Israel to assess aeroponics as a plant propagation method, and to determine the effect of disolved oxygen on the rooting of cuttings, produced some interesting results. Both Chrysanthemum (herbaceous cuttings) and Ficus (woody cuttings), noted as difficult-to-root species, responded to increased dissolved oxygen concentrations. The number of roots and total root length increased as dissolved oxygen increased.

    For Chrysanthemum, cuttings rooted over the enture stem surface, while Ficus cuttings only rooted at the cutting base. Nonetheless, rooting percentage and total root length for Ficus were greater in the aeroponic system than in plants from the same stock in a perlite/vermiculite mix or a sand/peat/redwood bark mix.

    The Disadvantages
    Apart from the relatively high set up costs, the technique is mechanically quite elaborate, susceptible to malfunction, requires precise regulation and control of water and nutrients, and has no buffer capacity to sustain even slight deviations or occasional malfunctions. In the event of blocked nozzles or breakdowns going unnoticed, plants may be irrepairably damaged in a relatively short time.

    Ein-Gedi System (EGS)
    Against this background, Israel took up the bat with a modified version of aeroponics. The commercial Ein Geidi System (EGS), developed by workers of the Agricultural Research Organisation, is a trough system that utilises the advantages of true water culture systems to overcome the limitations encountered with aeroponics and NFT, in effect combining the good points of all these systems.

    The EGS is an aero-hydroponics system, rather than a true aeroponic system – a flowing nutrient solution system in which plant roots are immersed in a deep, circulating, continuously aerated nutrient solution.

    The nutrient solution is delivered in two layers – a mist a mist on top of a liquid. The solution is injected into the trough by successive laser-cut apertures in a direction opposing that of the solution flow. This carries oxygen from the spray zone into the nutrient solution, aerating it and providing high oxygen concentrations at the root surface. This permits the roots to be immersed in a deep, large volume of nutrient solution, in troughs of any length. Aeration and delivery of spray varies according to the different designs of Ein geidi systems. The trough system uses a remote mechanical pump and piped spray system.

    Roots also grow in the spray zone. The spray is created by injecting nutrient solution, at relatively low water pressure through strategically placed nozzles.

    While there are no significant commercial EGS installations in Israel, other than those used for ornamental plants, commercial installations are in operation in Belgium and the USA, with tomatoes and cucumbers the major crops grown.

    The Ein Geidi System is also available as a mpropagation, hobby or laboratory unit and consists of an 18 litre cylindrical chamber (half filled with continuously agitated water), motor and housing, and removable cover with collared holes to support plants.

    It functions by drawing water up from the bottom centre of the container through a hollow, rotating impeller, driven by an electric motor. The rate of water uptake (2.01/m) is proportional to the rotating speed of the motor (3000 rpm). The drawn water is then thrown horizontally by centrifugal force into the air space above the water reservoir, creating a fine spray of water and, therefore, increasing the water surface area. Then, as the water droplets fall back into the agitated water, gas exchange takes place.

    Rainforest
    The rainforest system, produced in the USA, is similar to the EGS propgation unit in that it has a deep growth chamber, which is half filled with the nutrient solution, thereby making it an aero-hydroponic system.

    It differs in the mist delivery. A submersible pump draws water up a central tube to the top of the root chamber where the jet of water hits a curved plate, causing the solution to be sprayed horizontally onto the roots in the spray zone. The circle of water (not a true spray) created then falls back into the reservoir to provide gas excahnge. It has no extra aeration for the nutrient solution.

    Schwalbach System
    The Schwalbach System is a commercial aeroponics system developed in Australia. This simple, cost-efective system was developed by Keith Schwalbach of Wilberforce, NSW, to grow lettuce, parsley, silverbeet, celery, cabbage, stringless beans and strawberries.

    The system uses a 200 litre plastic nutrient tank which feeds a root chamber constructed of black plastic film supported by a framework of square galvanised pipe. The slow-revving mono pump can service up to 60 jets, with each root chamber fitted with 8 misting jets, enough to feed 48 plants. Each jet delivers 10 litres of nutrient solution per hour.

    The growing tops are constructed of 6mm thick structural foam polypropylene which is semi-rigid and resistant to acid and alkaline. It is UV stabilised, ‘food compatible’, and tolerant to a wide range of temperatures. Additionally, the tops are slightly curved to allow rapid rainwater run-off, thus reducing nutrient dilution. The tops also have pockets fitted to allow hoops for an igloo or shadecloth.

    The Schwalbach system is fully described in John Mason’s book, Commercial Hydroponics, published by Kangaroo Press.

    Aero-Gro System (AGS)
    The most recent innovation in aeroponics is the Australian-developed Aero-Gro System (AGS) which adopts ultra-sonic technology to nebuilise or vapourise the nutrient solution, providing a gog-like mist to the plant roots. (This mist is much finer than is achievable in conventional spray and pump systems.

    Until the development of the AGS, all aeroponic systems used a spray to deliver the nutrient solution, rather than a true mist or aerosol as defined by Steiner. The spray is delivered using pumps and small nozzels.

    The disadvantage of using a high-pressure pump delivery system is miniral build-up and eventually blocked nozzles; for low-pressure sprays the advantage of rapid nutrient absorption is diminsihed.

    Another disadvantage of spraying roots with a nutrient solution is that the roots tend to be washed into a matted tangle by the solution run-off. This tends to stifle root growth and can lead to disease problems if the plant roots are not allowed to dry out.

    The AGS, developed by Cameron Laurie, an Industrial Design graduate, nebulises the nutrient solution into a fog-like mist, in much the same way that the application of medication is atomised and delivered to the alveoli in the lungs of asthma patients. It was this example that led Cameron to develop the AGS. The application of this technology to aeroponics is currently subject of a patent pending.

    One method of nebulising is to force compressed air through a venturi. This requires jets for the nutrient solution which are again prone to blockages.

    The other method uses high-energy, ultra-sonic technology – a high frequency sound that blasts the nutrient solution into a fog-like mist.

    There are many advantages to nebulising the nutrient solution. Foremost, nutrients are absorbed more rapidly by roots, which are no longer prone to matting; because the nebuliser is soild state, mechanical breakdowns are virtually eliminated; power consumption is low; and maintenance is low because irrigation delivery lines and nozzles are no longer needed to deliver nutrients to plant roots.

    The AGS consists of a root chamber, much like the EGS, which also contains the nutrient solution. The ultra-sonic transducer is imbedded in a polystyrene foam which floats on the solution, with the chamber itself aerated to circulate the mist and to remove remove exudants. A prime benefit of this float system is that the water cools the transducer, which in turn warms the nutrient solution.

    Preliminary trials indicate that plant growth using the ultra-sonic delivery system is far superior to those grown in what can now be described as a conventional aeroponic delivery system. Marigold seedlings of the same age, and from the same punnet, were planted in the AGS chamber 10 days after those transplanted into a conventional system. At the time of the AGS planting, the marigold in the conventional system were 12 cm high, but only 7 cm high when transplanted into the AGS. After a further 10 days growth in the AGS had more than doubled to 15 cm, while those in the conventional system had only grown 2 cm to 14 cm. Further trials are underway to assess whether long-term commercial crops are viable without incurring the same problems encountered in NFT.

    Conclusion
    Theoretically, aeroponics is a good system. However, the use of hydroponics overall is dictated by economic considerations and it is here that conventional aeroponics is cost prohibitive for most growing applications. The requirement for expensive timing, irrigation and pumping equipment, and a regular maintenance schedule, put it out of reach for most growers. For propagation and laboratory experiments, however, it is well proven and in wide use.

    The development of the Aero-Gro System represents leading-edge technology. High plant performance, low maintenance schedule through the elimination of complex irrigation lines and equipment, and low power consumption, may make ultra-sonic aeroponics an economical proposition for commercial crops of the future.

    References(AGS)

    Adam J. Savage,
    Hydroponics Worldwide: State of the Art in Soilless Crop Production,
    International Center for Special Studies, Honolulu, 1985.

    Soffer, H. & Burger D.W.;
    Research on Aero-Hydroponics,
    HSA Proc 9th Annual Conference (p 69-74), 1988.

    Soffer, H. & D. Levinger;
    The Ein-Gedi System – Research and Development of a Hydroponic System,
    ISOC Proc. 5th Int. Cong. on Soilless Culture (p241-2532), 1980.

    Vestergaard, B;
    Oxygen Supply to the Roots in Different Hydroponic Systems,
    ISOSC Proc. 6th Int. Cong. on Soilless Culture (p723- 737), 1969.

    http://www.hydroponics.com.au/issue-05-aeroponics/

  7. #7


    When Plant Roots Get Fed By Nutrients Mists, It’s Called Aeroponics, And It Produces Great Results For High Value Crops

    Hydroponics is an indoor gardening system that uses sterile root zone media such as rockwool, coco coir or volcanic rock- instead of soil.
    Growers are responsible for feeding all nutrients to plants, because the root zone media contains no nutrients (although some varieties of coco coir or sphagnum moss contain small amounts of nutrients).

    Hydroponics systems are more effective than soil systems because roots can more easily and efficiently uptake nutrients from sterile media, and because growers can totally control what ratios and types of nutrients enter the plants.

    The next step for growers who want the most efficient hydroponics system is to convert to aeroponics.

    In an aeroponics system, plants are grown in troughs, tubes or other types of chambers. Their roots are not in any kind of solid material such as rockwool or soil. Instead, roots hang in space and are periodically bathed in nutrient mist. This means that roots can get larger and more easily absorb nutrients and oxygen. There’s less chance of root zone disease, because there’s no material for debris or pathogens to reside.

    A warning is in order, however. Because aeroponics system chambers are constantly wet with nutrient spray, they must be continually treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide solution to prevent the growth of harmful bacteria and fungi.

    Aeroponics plants have no root zone media to anchor in, so aeroponics systems have support collars that hold stems in place. These collars are rigid enough to hold plants upright and keep the roots in place, but flexible enough to allow plant growth.

    Although most gardeners are unaware of the role that oxygen plays in plant growth, hydroponics scientists have long known that the density of root zone media is a limiting factor on plant growth.

    That’s because roots need oxygen, and root zone media surrounds roots to limit the amount of oxygen they can absorb in comparison to how much they can absorb when grown aeroponically. Aeroponics nutrients are misted through oxygen, and there’s plenty of oxygen in the growing chamber for roots to absorb. That’s one reason aeroponics plants grow faster and absorb more nutrients than regular hydroponics plants.

    Another advantage of aeroponics systems is ease of cleaning and renewal. In regular hydroponics systems, growers have to remove and replace rockwool and other root zone media. In aeroponics systems, growers remove plants and their roots, wash the irrigation channels, reservoirs and root chambers with water and disinfectant, and then the system is ready for new plants.

    That being said, it would be misleading to give growers the impression that aeroponics systems are easy to set up and run. The increasing popularity of aeroponics has led to a variety of plug and play systems that involve about the same amount of set up as when a grower builds a pump-timer irrigated regular hydroponics system.

    Most aeroponics systems include standard features such as a lower chamber/reservoir, upper chamber, pumps, sprayers and neoprene collars. Many aeroponics systems feature continual chambers that run in rows. Others are a “stadium style” system that features a sub-structure that holds a V-shaped growing area with a high intensity light in the middle.

    One very important thing to know: any chamber in which roots reside must be opaque. Roots do not like light. They evolved to grow underground.

    One company manufactures a rotating aeroponics garden that revolves around a light. The manufacturers brag that plants produce extra resin because the plants are upside down during their rotation around the light.

    The range of benefits of aeroponics is large, but one of the most noticeable benefits is in early plants and clones.

    Using aeroponics for cloning improves root growth, survival rate, growth rate, and maturation time.

    As plants mature, aeroponics benefits include efficient use of fertilizer and more floral growth. Aeroponics plants can produce more flowers with less above-ground growth. They can be easily moved around in the aeroponics system, which is basically a modular system in which plants can be removed from one neoprene collar and placed in another.

    It’s important to use superior fertilizers in aeroponics systems. That’s because there’s no root zone media to buffer and hold nutrients. The nutrients have to be properly manufactured so they’ll spray easily and not cause clogs. They have to be manufactured in correct ratios and the proper pH buffering so they provide nutrients that can be immediately absorbed by roots.

    Plant science research in many versions of aeroponics gardens has established that Advanced Nutrients Grow, Micro, Bloom is an ideal fertilizer for use in aeroponics mist systems.

    The first aeroponic system was developed in Italy. The system was an aeroponic pipe supporting three cultivation trays. The trays were watered by sprinklers, and were covered with lids. This is not a true aeroponic system, because true aeroponics means that the roots are watered by mist sprayed in the root chamber.

    That system was modified into a vertical, multi-layered system. Plants were arranged in channels covered with dark plastic film to protect plant roots from light. Seedlings were then inserted in the film at suitable distances apart. More recent units use vertical PVC pipes with strawberry cultivars the usual crop grown. This is similar to an NFT system.

    The early promise of aeroponics has been consistently proven. The amazing ability of oxygen to increase plant metabolism, root formation and root efficiency have been well-established.

    Experiments in Israel measured the effect of dissolved oxygen on clone survival and rooting. Chrysanthemum (herbaceous cuttings) and Ficus (woody cuttings) are difficult to root species but their rooting rates were way higher, due to increased dissolved oxygen concentrations. The number of roots and total root length increased as dissolved oxygen increased.

    The Chrysanthemum cuttings rooted over the entire stem surface, and rooting percentage and total root length for Ficus were greater in aeroponics system than in plants from the same stock rooted in perlite/vermiculite or sand/peat/redwood bark mix.

    As stated earlier, aeroponics is not as easy or perfect as it sounds. It usually costs a lot to set up, even if you buy a pre-fab system. Learning to run an aeroponics garden is difficult. The gardens depend almost totally on high-pressure pumps, timers and sprayers, so power failure and other malfunctions can spell doom.

    Aeroponics systems are far less forgiving than regular hydroponics systems, especially as regards to electricity outages and loss of irrigation schedule. You have to master precise control of nutrients and water in aeroponics systems because there’s no root zone material to buffer solution. If the system has pump failure, bad nutrients, dry reservoir or blocked nozzles, your plants can be horribly damaged or killed in just a few hours.

    An interesting modification of the true aeroponics is the Ein Geidi System (EGS). This is a trough system combining aeroponics with the Nutrient Film Technique. Plant roots are immersed in a two-level, circulating, continuously-aerated nutrient solution.

    The nutrients are delivered in two layers: a mist on top of a liquid. The solution is injected into the trough by successive laser-cut apertures in a direction opposing that of the solution flow.

    This carries oxygen from the spray zone into the nutrient solution, aerating it and providing high oxygen concentrations at the root surface.

    Aeration, rate and volume of spray can be customized via controls and a pump and pipe spray system. Roots grow in the spray zone.

    The system is fun to watch, but hard to monitor and control. It draws water from the bottom centre of the reservoir through a hollow, rotating impeller driven by an electric motor. The rate of water uptake (2.01/m) is proportional to the rotating speed of the motor (3000 rpm).

    The drawn water is thrown horizontally by centrifugal force into the air space above the water reservoir, creating a fine spray of water and, therefore, increasing the water surface area. Then, as the water droplets fall back into the agitated water, gas exchange takes place.

    Another type of aeroponics system has a growth chamber half filled with nutrient solution. This type is called an aero-hydroponic system. Mist is delivered via a submersible pump that draws water up a central tube to the top of the root chamber where jets of water hits a curved plate.

    Nutrient solution sprays horizontally onto roots. The water returns back into the reservoir to provide gas exchange. It has no extra aeration for the nutrient solution.

    An Australian system called “The Schwalbach System” is a commercial aeroponics system developed in Australia. It has a 200 litre nutrient tank feeding a root chamber constructed of black plastic film supported by square galvanized pipe framing.

    The slow-revving mono pump services 60 jets that deliver 10 litres of nutrient solution per hour.

    The growing tops are constructed of 6mm thick structural foam polypropylene which is semi-rigid and resistant to acid and alkaline. It’s UV stabilized and able to handle a wide range of temperatures. The tops are curved to allow rapid rainwater run-off, thus reducing nutrient dilution. The tops also have pockets fitted to allow hoops for an igloo or shadecloth.

    Another Aussie innovation is called the Aero-Gro System (AGS). It uses ultra-sonic technology to nebuilise nutrient solution. This mist is much finer than achievable in conventional spray and pump aero systems.

    Until the development of AGS, aeroponic systems used a spray to deliver the nutrient solution, rather than a true mist or aerosol. One problem with using high-pressure pump delivery systems is mineral build-up and blocked nozzles, but low pressure sprays don’t deliver rapid nutrient absorption.

    Another disadvantage of spraying roots with a nutrient solution is that roots are often washed into a matted tangle by the solution run-off. This stifles root growth and can lead to disease problems if plant roots are not allowed to dry out between spraying sessions.

    The AGS solves this problem by vaporizing nutrient solution into a fog-like mist, in much the same way that the application of medication is atomized and delivered to the alveoli in the lungs of asthma patients.

    One method of nebulising is to force compressed air through a venturi. This requires jets for the nutrient solution; such jets are easily prone to blockage. Another method uses high-energy, ultra-sonic technology: high frequency sound that blasts nutrient solution into a fog-like mist.

    There are many advantages to nebulising the nutrient solution. Nutrients are absorbed more rapidly by roots, which are no longer prone to matting. The nebuliser is solid state. Mechanical breakdowns are virtually eliminated. Power consumption is lower. Maintenance needs are less because irrigation doesn’t require delivery lines and nozzles.

    The AGS has a root chamber that contains nutrient solution. The ultra-sonic transducer is imbedded in polystyrene foam floating in the solution. The chamber is aerated. A prime benefit of this float system is that water cools the transducer, which means the water warms up. Nutrients delivered to roots in spray that is in a range of 68 to 75 degrees F are ideally absorbable.

    Research shows that plant growth in ultra-sonic systems is superior to those grown in conventional aeroponics.

    Aeroponics in all its many forms is a high-tech growing method that requires expertise, investment, monitoring, and quality nutrients such as Advanced Nutrients Grow, Micro, Bloom.

    Because aeroponics costs more to set up and run than regular garden methods, it is most appropriate for high value crops.


    http://www.advancednutrients.com/art...ech-gardening/

  8. #8
    Aquaponics is Easy! - YouTube
    Video for https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t-HilVK5sk8
    ▶ 2:21
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t-HilVK5sk8
    Aug 26, 2011 - Uploaded by easydiyaquaponics
    ... to 10 times more food in 1/5 the space in half the time all year round compared to a conventional garden .


    Aquaponics Simple System Overview - YouTube
    Video for https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t-HilVK5sk8
    ▶ 6:27
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tea8knevRQI
    May 15, 2010 - Uploaded by Neal McSpadden
    http://www.theprimalprepper.com My urban apartment balcony aquaponics ... I wouldn't rely on a



    Introduction to Home Aquaponics - YouTube
    Video for https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t-HilVK5sk8
    ▶ 4:32
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0-MJRB18T_o
    Jun 6, 2011 - Uploaded by University of Hawai‘i News
    Learn more http://www.hawaii.edu/malamalama/2011. .... I can't find the 10 page instructions for this system

  9. #9

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Anna, Texas
    Posts
    2,756
    To big of a technical challenge for me. I will stick to aguaponics.fish,plants and only uses 10% of the water a ground garden does.
    "When law and morality contradict each other, the citizen has the cruel alternative of either losing his moral sense or losing his respect for the law." ~ Frederic Bastiilt

    "Duty is ours; results are God's."

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2,705
    A fellow I know tried using for growing certain high value plants. Before that he used hydroponics. The aeroponics was a lot more work, more expensive to set up and maintain, and a lot more complicated. This wasn't in a desert but here in the Northeast in a basement. I don't know if he got the improvement in the product he was looking for. He went back to hydroponics and has since moved to CA. Sorry I cant provide more info. What are you trying to grow? They use a lot of this type of stuff in urban farming of greens and other leafy veggies.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    3,352
    Not doing Aero, but am trying Rain Gutters. This is working way better than I expected. Here is a tomato plant we named Godzilla and about 40 green bean (bush) that are simply covered with beans. The center height of the greenhouse is about 7 feet. Got many more tomatoes and peppers from seeds in buckets.

    The gutters initially were bad for algae, but only between the buckets. We picked up a single sheet box of tinfoil at the $1 store and have placed a sheet between buckets to shut out the light. Gutters have been clear for over 2 weeks now.

    Gravity feed water into gutters with a small float valve. Two gutters, 17 buckets are drinking about 10 gallons of water a week. It has been amazing.
    Attached Images

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    S. Texas
    Posts
    9,894
    I'm looking at Aeroponics for vegetables, grown where good soil, water and controlled climate space is in short supply.

    Aeroponics uses a fraction of the water and nutrient additions required by even hydroponics and claims faster grow
    rates with roots exposed to oxygen in air. Cloning cuttings of favorite mother plant supposed to go much easier, too.

    NASA quote: "Aeroponics systems can reduce water usage by 98 percent, fertilizer usage by 60 percent, and pesticide
    usage by 100 percent, all while maximizing crop yields. Plants grown in the aeroponic systems have also been shown to
    uptake more minerals and vitamins, making the plants healthier and potentially more nutritious."


    Also, done in barrel or tower configuration, very small footprint which means smaller greenhouse space to cool/warm, too.



    One wand with dozen misting nozzles goes vertically down through center and timer control sprays for a few seconds on
    then a minute off. Drain in bottom collects excess to go back to reservoir. One, < $100 pump, does four of these barrels.



    Above would have 40-45 plants, some bbls sit atop small casters on its base so it can be periodically and easily rotated
    more in/out of direct sunlight manually.

    Same size bbl and configuration as above in photo below under all the green...



    These are commercial made versions, taller and thinner...



    If interested and new to Aeroponics, start here...
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aeroponics

    Then, start checking out Aeroponic Youtubes, especially Art Garden, not so much
    to buy the complete, but pricey, Aeroponic systems he's selling, but for the DIY info.

    - Shane
    Last edited by shane; 06-13-2016 at 12:55 PM.

    THE GOOD NEWS ABOUT NUCLEAR DESTRUCTION!
    WHAT TO DO IF A NUCLEAR DISASTER IS IMMINENT!
    When An ill Wind Blows From Afar! (Overseas Fallout)

    "A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them;
    the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences."
    - Proverbs 22:3

  14. #14
    Interesting, I'll check out the links, and see if there is anything I can apply.

    It has always sounded a little fiddly for me, and if the equipment fails, or you don't have a backup when the power goes out: SOL. That is one of my bigger issues. I prefer low tech sysetms that can be altered if plan A is no longer viable.

    Thanks.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by BH View Post
    Not doing Aero, but am trying Rain Gutters. This is working way better than I expected. Here is a tomato plant we named Godzilla and about 40 green bean (bush) that are simply covered with beans. The center height of the greenhouse is about 7 feet. Got many more tomatoes and peppers from seeds in buckets.

    The gutters initially were bad for algae, but only between the buckets. We picked up a single sheet box of tinfoil at the $1 store and have placed a sheet between buckets to shut out the light. Gutters have been clear for over 2 weeks now.

    Gravity feed water into gutters with a small float valve. Two gutters, 17 buckets are drinking about 10 gallons of water a week. It has been amazing.
    I do this too. Cheap and easy, and the plants do very well. Mine are not hooked up. I just fill them with a hose - eventually, I'll probably hook them up to a tank, but haven't gotten around to plumbing the tanks for overflow yet. Haven't yet had a problem with algae; have actually been trying to grown duckweed in there.

    Love these. No complicated equipment to break, no special ferts, no electrical extension cords strung all over the yard, no weeding, and no bending over.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    S. Texas
    Posts
    9,894
    Quote Originally Posted by Faroe View Post
    Interesting, I'll check out the links, and see if there is anything I can apply.

    It has always sounded a little fiddly for me, and if the equipment fails, or you don't have a backup when the power goes out: SOL. That is one of my bigger issues. I prefer low tech sysetms that can be altered if plan A is no longer viable.

    Thanks.
    That's my biggest concern as well, you can lose everything if the roots dry out from equip failure.

    It would be quick and easy to flip over to back-up battery and/or pump if prepared to do so, BUT
    you've got to both be near there and be automatically warned 24/7 whenever there is an issue.
    The 24/7 automated warning systems are available and widely employed, but can't take vacation
    unless you've got neighbor that can both get that alert and knows how to implement alternative.

    But, all that said, my greatest reliance and fullest utilization of such a system will be after TSHTF
    and I won't likely be straying far afield anymore from my AO in those dark & dire days.

    - Shane

    THE GOOD NEWS ABOUT NUCLEAR DESTRUCTION!
    WHAT TO DO IF A NUCLEAR DISASTER IS IMMINENT!
    When An ill Wind Blows From Afar! (Overseas Fallout)

    "A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them;
    the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences."
    - Proverbs 22:3

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    20
    Here is a picture of the low pressure aeroponic system I built this year, this picture was taken 6/12/16.



    Inside the 5x5 vinyl fenceposts are 1/2 inch pvc pipes, with a sprayer at each plant which are spaced 1 foot apart. The fencepost caps have a hole drilled in them for the feed pipe, the posts have a hole drilled at the bottom for a 1/2 inch pvc drain pipe, and everything is sealed with silicone. The system drains down to a 40 gallon tote that is buried in the ground, which has a 1638 GPH pump I got from amazon feeding the whole operation. The problems I have faced this year so far: The pump I initially purchased was much smaller, and wasn't powerful enough to run 5 lines of 7-8 sprayers each. Initially my drainage system used 1/2 inch pipe, all 5 draining into a 1/2 inch line. This was inadequate, so now each 1/2 inch drain feeds into 2" pvc, and this works great. The final (so far) challenge I faced a couple days ago, was that the roots of the plants invaded the drains for a couple tubes, and clogged them up, I bought some screens that you would put in a sink drain, snipped a little off the sides, and placed them inverted over the drain in each tube, and so far that has solved the problem. On 5/28 I harvested 2 heads of lettuce and a week later I harvested enough swiss chard for dinner one night another head of lettuce will be salad tonight. I can't help with desert suitability as I live in CT, but it is working unbelievably well here. In a 10x10 area the system holds 39 plants.

    Wobby

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    S. Texas
    Posts
    9,894
    Quote Originally Posted by wobby View Post
    Here is a picture of the low pressure aeroponic system I built this year, this picture was taken 6/12/16.



    Inside the 5x5 vinyl fenceposts are 1/2 inch pvc pipes, with a sprayer at each plant which are spaced 1 foot apart. The fencepost caps have a hole drilled in them for the feed pipe, the posts have a hole drilled at the bottom for a 1/2 inch pvc drain pipe, and everything is sealed with silicone. The system drains down to a 40 gallon tote that is buried in the ground, which has a 1638 GPH pump I got from amazon feeding the whole operation. The problems I have faced this year so far: The pump I initially purchased was much smaller, and wasn't powerful enough to run 5 lines of 7-8 sprayers each. Initially my drainage system used 1/2 inch pipe, all 5 draining into a 1/2 inch line. This was inadequate, so now each 1/2 inch drain feeds into 2" pvc, and this works great. The final (so far) challenge I faced a couple days ago, was that the roots of the plants invaded the drains for a couple tubes, and clogged them up, I bought some screens that you would put in a sink drain, snipped a little off the sides, and placed them inverted over the drain in each tube, and so far that has solved the problem. On 5/28 I harvested 2 heads of lettuce and a week later I harvested enough swiss chard for dinner one night another head of lettuce will be salad tonight. I can't help with desert suitability as I live in CT, but it is working unbelievably well here. In a 10x10 area the system holds 39 plants.

    Wobby
    Looks great, Wobby, thanks for sharing that!

    So, now that your system is sorted out, how does plant growth and overall production
    compare to any other types of traditional gardening you do or have done in the past?

    - Shane

    THE GOOD NEWS ABOUT NUCLEAR DESTRUCTION!
    WHAT TO DO IF A NUCLEAR DISASTER IS IMMINENT!
    When An ill Wind Blows From Afar! (Overseas Fallout)

    "A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them;
    the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences."
    - Proverbs 22:3

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by shane View Post
    That's my biggest concern as well, you can lose everything if the roots dry out from equip failure.

    It would be quick and easy to flip over to back-up battery and/or pump if prepared to do so, BUT
    you've got to both be near there and be automatically warned 24/7 whenever there is an issue.
    The 24/7 automated warning systems are available and widely employed, but can't take vacation
    unless you've got neighbor that can both get that alert and knows how to implement alternative.

    But, all that said, my greatest reliance and fullest utilization of such a system will be after TSHTF
    and I won't likely be straying far afield anymore from my AO in those dark & dire days.

    - Shane
    It is definitely worth a trial. Even if you don't like it, I expect you will find that much of the equipment and skill sets from the project will carry over into other ways for producing food. I reuse stuff from year to year, just tweaking it for entirely different projects.

    Eventually the desert sun destroys anything plastic - sheeting, tarps, pvc, and all the grow buckets. EDPM is supposed to have a lifespan of decades. That is my next purchase - wonder if I'll get 5 years out of it here in NM.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    S. Texas
    Posts
    9,894
    Quote Originally Posted by Faroe View Post
    It is definitely worth a trial. Even if you don't like it, I expect you will find that much of the equipment and skill sets from the project will carry over into other ways for producing food. I reuse stuff from year to year, just tweaking it for entirely different projects.

    Eventually the desert sun destroys anything plastic - sheeting, tarps, pvc, and all the grow buckets. EDPM is supposed to have a lifespan of decades. That is my next purchase - wonder if I'll get 5 years out of it here in NM.
    I'm reading now that including an accumulator into the system design will keep system pressured
    up to run a number of days if pump or main electrical system that's driving pump went down. Still
    need some small back-up electricity to run timer and solenoid opening/closing fluid to sprayers.

    - Shane

    THE GOOD NEWS ABOUT NUCLEAR DESTRUCTION!
    WHAT TO DO IF A NUCLEAR DISASTER IS IMMINENT!
    When An ill Wind Blows From Afar! (Overseas Fallout)

    "A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them;
    the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences."
    - Proverbs 22:3

  21. #21









    A few months ago, our elderly neighbors started gardening in the driveway using plastic laundry baskets. The HH told me I needed to go and take a look because it was incredible!

    Hopefully, my attempt to explain this way of gardening to you will make sense. My neighbor, Mr. G., told me that he spent all winter researching ways to grow a garden because of his limited mobility. He and Mrs. G. are no longer able to till a garden or squat and bend to pick weeds and vegetables. So, they came up with a basket garden and it is amazing!

    IMG_0206

    Mr. G. started with cheap laundry baskets from Wal-Mart and lined them with landscape fabric to hold in the dirt. He also drilled a hole in the bottom of the basket and inserted a tube to soak up water.

    IMG_0207 (1)

    Mr. G’s sons took a gutter and stabilized it using wood and the baskets were placed on top of this structure. As you can see from the photos, concrete blocks were used to give the structure height.

    IMG_0205

    This photo shows a plastic floating device that regulates the water that goes into the gutter. Think toilet! When the water in the gutter gets low the “float” drops down which opens a valve and releases water to the garden!

    IMG_1516

    Look at the blue barrel in the corner of the above photo. This is what feeds water into the gutters that, in turn, feeds water to the plants. Using a hose pipe, Mr. G fills the barrel up with water and has a self-watering garden!

    IMG_1515

    IMG_1518

    IMG_1517

    As you can see, the garden baskets are producing very well. This is a great method of gardening for elderly people or people who have a limited amount of space. Here are some other methods of small gardening.

    What do you think of the basket garden? Scroll down and leave a comment, I love to hear from you!

    Blessings….Lucy!




    http://www.lucysnest.com/laundry-basket-garden/

  22. #22
    Ok, now I have to try it.

    Small scale, easy to do, cheap. Also, he most recommends this for cuttings, and to do this in cooler weather for better root health. If you are just rooting cuttings, you only need water. Process takes two weeks, and plant will produce fruit much sooner than if grown from seed. Good demo/class. There are some sound problems in the beginning, but worth the watch.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8eMt3kCUYnw

    Hope the link works. This is the GardenPond guy. I've watched his vids. on duckweed. I think he was on an episode of Preppers from NatGeo.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    S. Texas
    Posts
    9,894
    Quote Originally Posted by Faroe View Post
    Ok, now I have to try it.

    Small scale, easy to do, cheap. Also, he most recommends this for cuttings, and to do this in cooler weather for better root health. If you are just rooting cuttings, you only need water. Process takes two weeks, and plant will produce fruit much sooner than if grown from seed. Good demo/class. There are some sound problems in the beginning, but worth the watch.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8eMt3kCUYnw

    Hope the link works. This is the GardenPond guy. I've watched his vids. on duckweed. I think he was on an episode of Preppers from NatGeo.
    Yes, I like his expertise and info, too.

    The only one I've seen to stay away from is the Tower Garden stuff, as it's overpriced MLM that just
    low pressure drips water down inside of tube over roots, not close to high pressure intermittent misting.

    - Shane

    THE GOOD NEWS ABOUT NUCLEAR DESTRUCTION!
    WHAT TO DO IF A NUCLEAR DISASTER IS IMMINENT!
    When An ill Wind Blows From Afar! (Overseas Fallout)

    "A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them;
    the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences."
    - Proverbs 22:3

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    20
    Quote Originally Posted by shane View Post
    Looks great, Wobby, thanks for sharing that!

    So, now that your system is sorted out, how does plant growth and overall production
    compare to any other types of traditional gardening you do or have done in the past?

    - Shane
    I've only grown in dirt prior to this endeavor. My prior experience with lettuce, and greens in general here is that well before maturity, the bugs end up eating more of them than we do. I suspect that this system, being 2 feet off the ground has really helped with that problem. I've noticed the ants are nosing around now, so I'm going to try spraying something on the legs of the pvc table to keep them off, I haven't looked into just what yet. The speed of growth is just unreal. I harvested 2 lettuce plants before June, and around here most folks aren't even planting until Memorial day. My water reservoir is below ground, so that evens out the temperatures enough that I felt comfortable putting the plants in a little early . My tomatoes shot up like rockets, and if I had to guess, I would say I am at least 3 weeks ahead of the game, and I am getting more blossoms, and tomatoes than I have ever seen on any of my tomato plants previously by a factor of 2-3. I just switched out the nutrients today from general hydroponics maxi-growth to maxi-bloom, so don't believe that the tomatoes won't set with just maxi-growth. I have a small grow table with led spotlights in the house that I put together, and am switching over from lettuce (to replace those we eat) to swiss chard in a week or two, hoping that chard is a little heartier when temps warm up more. I've noticed that the lettuce wilts a bit around the edges when temps get much above 80, so I'm guessing that I want to have something else out there once the temps get above 90 in a few weeks. On a lark, I started a few habenero plants, and some cauliflower. The habeneros are about average for this time of year, but I suspect once the temperatures rise, they will take off like everything else, and the cauliflower is growing like gangbusters, we'll see how they do once they flower. I'll post some pics and an update in a couple of weeks. I'm in a lake community with the houses close together, and it is a bit amusing, that most folks driving down the road slow way down to check out the garden, and I've had many folks stop in to ask what on earth I'm doing to get the plants to grow so well.

    Wobby

  25. #25

  26. #26
    Uses for Duckweed

    This list of over seventy uses for duckweed is by no means final, but is meant to give you an inkling of what is possible. I can’t lay claim to developing all of them. A big thank you goes out to all my fellow duckweed enthusiasts from around the world who have been kind enough to share their experiences with me.
    Disclaimer: As this is only a list, please exercise common sense and safe practices in any application.

    Uses for Duckweed

    Indoor Pets

    Hamsters and Gerbils
    Mice
    Goldfish, Bettas, Koi
    Turtles
    Aquarium water cleaner
    As a fish laxative
    Frozen duckweed treats

    Organic Gardening

    Compost
    Soil amendment
    Green mulch in vegetable gardens
    Green mulch in fruit orchards
    Green mulch for potted plants
    Green mulch for flower beds

    Animal Feedstock

    Ducks and geese
    Chickens- layers and brooders
    Pea fowl
    Rabbits
    Sheep
    Hogs
    Goats
    Cattle
    Fermented feed for livestock

    Aquaculture

    Tilapia
    Grass Carp
    Koi
    Catfish

    Pond Health and Management

    Measurement of waste nutrient loads in ponds
    Algae suppression
    Frog haven
    Water health of pond
    Suppression of mosquito larvae
    Minimize evaporation of water
    Cooler water columns
    Suppression of underwater vegetation
    Burning duckweed to drive away mosquitos
    As a cover to protect fish from predators

    Vermiculture

    Material for worm beds

    Soldier Fly Propagation

    As breeding ground/compost medium
    Closed loop system

    Bioenergy

    Biomethane
    Ethanol production
    Duckweed pellets for home heating
    Electricity

    Wastewater Bioremediation

    Wastewater remediation of nitrogen and phosphorus
    Polisher of heavy metals and biological pathogens
    Interplant with wetland plants for prolonging season
    Waste nutrient recycling of duckweed into animal feedstock, bioenergy, etc…
    Retaining pond or canal around agriculture fields to collect fertilizer leachate for bioremediation (thanks for the reminder, Ken Carman!)

    Integrated farming

    Farm animal/biomethane/duckweed semi-closed loop systems
    Aquaponics- tilapia/hydroponics/duckweed semi-closed loop systems
    Combined fish/duckweed systems

    Art

    Photos
    Waterscaping Outdoors
    Waterscaping Indoors
    Chlorophyl Art
    Dried duckweed applications

    Social Inter-relations

    Neighborhood duckweed pond recycling
    Bartering duckweed for goods or services

    Health

    Chinese medicinal uses
    Homeopathy

    Human Food

    Lemna recipes
    Watermeal recipes
    Protein tofu and refined powdered source for protein additives

    NASA

    Space travel research
    OMEGA project research

    Research

    Gene manipulation for wide variety of applications
    Indicators of variances in research testing

    Education

    Duckweed science experiments for kids
    Lessons in sustainable aquaculture
    Promotion for sustainable wastewater reuse

    Commercial Uses

    As large-scale protein feed supplement
    As large-scale bioenergy feedstock
    Bioplastic raw ingredient (Thanks Ryan Hunt!)

    © Tamra Fakhoorian 2012 No portion may be copied or used without express permission of the author.

    https://duckweedgardening.com/sevent...-for-duckweed/

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    S. Texas
    Posts
    9,894
    Quote Originally Posted by wobby View Post
    I've only grown in dirt prior to this endeavor. My prior experience with lettuce, and greens in general here is that well before maturity, the bugs end up eating more of them than we do. I suspect that this system, being 2 feet off the ground has really helped with that problem. I've noticed the ants are nosing around now, so I'm going to try spraying something on the legs of the pvc table to keep them off, I haven't looked into just what yet. The speed of growth is just unreal. I harvested 2 lettuce plants before June, and around here most folks aren't even planting until Memorial day. My water reservoir is below ground, so that evens out the temperatures enough that I felt comfortable putting the plants in a little early . My tomatoes shot up like rockets, and if I had to guess, I would say I am at least 3 weeks ahead of the game, and I am getting more blossoms, and tomatoes than I have ever seen on any of my tomato plants previously by a factor of 2-3. I just switched out the nutrients today from general hydroponics maxi-growth to maxi-bloom, so don't believe that the tomatoes won't set with just maxi-growth. I have a small grow table with led spotlights in the house that I put together, and am switching over from lettuce (to replace those we eat) to swiss chard in a week or two, hoping that chard is a little heartier when temps warm up more. I've noticed that the lettuce wilts a bit around the edges when temps get much above 80, so I'm guessing that I want to have something else out there once the temps get above 90 in a few weeks. On a lark, I started a few habenero plants, and some cauliflower. The habeneros are about average for this time of year, but I suspect once the temperatures rise, they will take off like everything else, and the cauliflower is growing like gangbusters, we'll see how they do once they flower. I'll post some pics and an update in a couple of weeks. I'm in a lake community with the houses close together, and it is a bit amusing, that most folks driving down the road slow way down to check out the garden, and I've had many folks stop in to ask what on earth I'm doing to get the plants to grow so well.

    Wobby
    Wobby, That's great and very encouraging. Can't wait to get my system together now, thanks!

    You know cloning cuttings is supposed to be very 1 step easy, too, with Aeroponics according to...
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8eMt3kCUYnw
    ...to skip always starting from seeds and all, just pick your best mother plant.

    I can't see from photo if anything between the rows or if open below, but if solid bottom, and bugs
    a concern, as close as everything is, you might could just drape it all over with a lightweight netting.

    - Shane

    THE GOOD NEWS ABOUT NUCLEAR DESTRUCTION!
    WHAT TO DO IF A NUCLEAR DISASTER IS IMMINENT!
    When An ill Wind Blows From Afar! (Overseas Fallout)

    "A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them;
    the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences."
    - Proverbs 22:3

  28. #28
    One can talk all day about Aeroponics it seems without talking about what is going to be used for fertilization of the roots.

    Say compost tea with a hydroponic mix would be great but just a straight hydroponic mix will grow big plants but not so great health wise for those eating the produce.

    For a start there is only about 17 minerals present in a hydroponic mix. Care to look for minerals needed by Diabetics!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!

    /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

    Hydroponic and Organic Plant Production Systems
    Posted By:
    CropKing Admin
    Posted On:

    Authored by: James W. Brown

    A question we frequently hear is whether a growing system can be both Hydroponic and “organic”. The answer can be complicated and depends upon how certain terms are defined, as well as preconceived ideas on the part of the individuals involved in the discussion.
    What does “hydroponic” mean?

    The literal definition of hydroponic is “working water.” The confusion in defining hydroponic and “organic” growing systems begins when many people apply the term “hydroponic” to any production system that does not contain soil. Still others use the term when referring to systems that contain only (or mainly) a water solution. Usually, the only medium, or solid matter, used in this type of system is for starting seeds.

    For the purposes of this article, a hydroponic growing system will be defined as one where fertilizer ingredients are in solution in the root environment of the plants, and any solid media in the plant root environment will not significantly interact with the fertilizer in the water of the system.
    What exactly is “organic”?

    Beginning with the implementation of the National Organic Program (NOP), the term “organic” has usually referred to a plant production system that meets the numerous requirements and restrictions of the NOP.

    Although one might think this implies that determining whether or not a system is organic would be simple, in fact it is not. Some individuals may not fully understand non-traditional growing systems and may therefore conclude that because a system is non-traditional, it is not organic. For example, a growing system in a greenhouse may not be thought to be organic because it is not in the traditional field setting.

    For the purposes of this article, we will be referring to an organic production system that is certifiable under the guidelines of the National Organic Program. However, we will not define the certification program itself or its particulars.
    Can a production system be both hydroponic and organic?

    If a production system meets the definitions of both a hydroponic and an organic system, then it is a hydroponic organic production system. It goes without saying that an organic system is not usually a hydroponic system and that a hydroponic system is not usually an organic system. The question, however, is whether there can be any overlap between a hydroponic system and an organic system. The answer to that question takes some background and definition.
    A closer look at hydroponic systems.

    Although there is a wide range of working definitions for hydroponic growing systems, a fairly restrictive hydroponic model will be described here. Most people would accept the growing system outlined here as being hydroponic.

    In a hydroponic growing system, the water in the system is the sole source of the dissolved minerals and other ingredients that are fed to the plant through the roots. The plants in the system absorb the organic hydroponic nutrients they need for growth from the water available in the root environment. Generally speaking, a hydroponic growing system will not contain any medium that interacts with nutrients and minerals present in the system’s water solution.

    Soil is not used in a hydroponic system. It usually interacts with the water it contains, and an equilibrium of soluble components is established between those dissolved in the water and the same components attached to soil particles. The fertilizer components are not dissolved when they are attached to the soil particles.

    Other media are not used in a hydroponic system. Many other media including organic and mineral media will interact with the fertilizer ingredients in a solution. Organic media might include peat, sawdust, bark, rice hulls, corn-cobs, straw, peanut shells, and coco core. Some mineral media, such as vermiculite, have a high interaction when in contact with fertilizer ingredients in a water solution.

    There are mineral ingredients that virtually do not interact with fertilizer ingredients in a system’s solution and can be present in the plant rooting volume of a hydroponic system. Common media in this category include perlite and rockwool. Any interaction between these media and the fertilizer solution is absent or minimal.
    A closer look at organic systems.

    An organic system, including a certifiable organic system, will include an environment where micro-organisms can live and make otherwise unavailable plant nutrients water soluble and thus available to the plants. This is an important and basic component of any fully organic system or any system that has an organic component operating within it. The media (or at least a portion of the media) and the fertilizers used in the plant production system are the food and energy sources for the micro-organisms living and operating within that system.

    Usually the microorganisms are active in the media surrounding the roots of the plants in the organic production system. This is consistent with traditional or usual plant production systems utilizing soil as the growing medium, which also harbors micro-organisms that interact and provide nutrients to the plants.
    The hydroponic and organic system overlap.

    When the microbial activity in a growing system is lodged in a physically separate location from the plant root environment, and the nutrients are delivered to the plant roots via solution, a system that is both hydroponic and certifiably organic can and has been developed. One such system is the commercial system illustrated in the accompanying pictures, which is operating in the northeastern part of the United States. It has been certified as organic under the NOP, and the produce growing in this system is being sold as Certified Organic produce.

    This particular system is a nutrient film technique (NFT) hydroponic system that uses only NOP-approved materials. The insoluble components are located and operate in an environment separate from the plant root environment. The digestion system bears similarities to systems used in fish-waste digestion and some “aquaponic” systems.

    This may be considered a non-traditional system from either the hydroponic or the organic perspective. It has, however, many similarities to what some growers and experimenters have been working with and using for several years. Plant growth and production in the system is comparable to that in a traditional soluble fertilizer NFT system. This is because the system is working optimally.

    During the development process of this system, experimental systems leading to this final version produced many crops that grew much more slowly. A system that produces slower plant growth is not providing all the necessary nutrients at sufficient frequency for optimal plant growth. Until the systems were fine-tuned, crop growth could be inconsistent.
    The NFT hydroponic organic production system.

    The herbs and lettuce in the accompanying pictures are growing in NFT channels. The only medium utilized in the system is a small plug of soilless material used to keep the seed or seeds from floating away during germination. The plug is placed into the production channels, but it plays no role other than to stabilize the seed. The channels are continuously fed a solution of fertilizer ingredients that were produced in an organic digestion system.

    The digestion system, the source of the nutrient solution that is circulated through the growing channels, uses a shredded solid that provides surface area for the growth and activity of the micro-organisms. Fertilizer ingredients are periodically added to the digestion system, where they are processed by the micro-organisms. The effluent from the digester is fed into the recirculating NFT feed system to provide nutrition through the roots of the plants.

    The size of the digester must be in correct proportion to the production system needs to provide adequate organic hydroponic nutrients for the plants to achieve optimal growth. However, the system cannot be oversized relative to the system’s needs. If the organic hydroponic nutrients produced by the digestion system are not used by the plants, they need to be disposed of in some other way to ensure the ongoing health of the micro-organisms. This creates an unwanted issue for the grower. Proper sizing of the system is important for optimum operation and the survival of the microbial population.
    Why hydroponic and organic?

    NFT systems have a nutrient solution reservoir from which the solution is continually pumped through the channels and back to the reservoir. The plant roots are in an environment where their only source of nutrients is solution pumped through the channels. This makes the system hydroponic in its function. However, because the NOP-approved nutrients are made soluble by organic micro-organisms in a digester system attached to the growing system, the system is also organic. But why go organic at all? Why don’t we see produce marketed as hydroponic organic produce?

    Here is the reason: among the general population, there is more familiarity with the term “organic,” and all its perceived benefits, than there is with the term “hydroponic.” As a result, the addition of the term hydroponic gives no marketing benefit and may in some instances backfire by raising questions or negative responses to the produce. Organic produce is perceived as more desirable and, therefore, more valuable than hydroponic or hydroponic organic produce. Growers using a hydroponic organic system will market their produce as being organic because that will command a premium price in most markets.

    Why grow with an NFT organic system at all? The hydroponic NFT system is caple of more rapid plant growth and produce production than most media-based, traditional grwoing systems. The system described here gives both the rapid growth of a hydroponic NFT system and the organic produce that commands the high price in the market.

    https://www.cropking.com/blog/hydrop...uction-systems
    Last edited by China Connection; 06-14-2016 at 04:30 AM.

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    S. Texas
    Posts
    9,894
    Quote Originally Posted by China Connection View Post
    One can talk all day about Aeroponics it seems without talking about what is going to be used for fertilization of the roots.

    Say compost tea with a hydroponic mix would be great but just a straight hydroponic mix will grow big plants but not so great health wise for those eating the produce.

    For a start there is only about 17 minerals present in a hydroponic mix. Care to look for minerals needed by Diabetics!
    That is legit concern, I'd want to be sure I had my trace minerals covered well and them some.
    Seems like we keep discovering synergistic elements and compounds we had earlier never known
    or appreciated their need for, and a little dose of an organic compost tea might could cover those bases.

    I don't know for sure, have not researched it in depth yet, but I'd bet this has been addressed and
    that there are some really good formulations out there, in fact, would not be surprised if many are
    very superior to your typically deficient, in one way or another, soils our food usually comes from.

    - Shane

    THE GOOD NEWS ABOUT NUCLEAR DESTRUCTION!
    WHAT TO DO IF A NUCLEAR DISASTER IS IMMINENT!
    When An ill Wind Blows From Afar! (Overseas Fallout)

    "A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them;
    the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences."
    - Proverbs 22:3

  30. #30

  31. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by shane View Post
    That is legit concern, I'd want to be sure I had my trace minerals covered well and them some.
    Seems like we keep discovering synergistic elements and compounds we had earlier never known
    or appreciated their need for, and a little dose of an organic compost tea might could cover those bases.

    I don't know for sure, have not researched it in depth yet, but I'd bet this has been addressed and
    that there are some really good formulations out there, in fact, would not be surprised if many are
    very superior to your typically deficient, in one way or another, soils our food usually comes from.

    - Shane
    Basic chemical fertilizers are good to have on hand. A little MiracleGro will fix up a yellowing tomato plant fast. Why was the plant yellowing? I don't know. Maybe the compost in the pot wasn't aged enough. Whatever. I go by results, and the chemical stuff works for me when I need it.

    The subject gets confusing however, applied to aero, and hydro, just because the fertilizers get more costly for these applications, and they come in liquid form, not dry, so the shelf life may be less, and the shipping cost is more. The literature hints at dire consequences for using just any old fertilizer (they aren't "formulated to work with just water" ??!!), and compost tea supposedly introduces way too many pathogens. I CAN see bio films of even finely strained "tea" clogging the sprinkler heads. Other people say fish water works just fine here.

    A note on the Zip towers. I like Nate's videos, but he sure seems to have encouraged some bad blood on that one. He doesn't get to own the concept if people can just make versions of their own! Tough cookies.

    Shane, I haven't made these, but they should work fine with just a drip, since the idea is to use a fiberous material inside that serves for both support and water distribution - Matalla (spell?) pond filter sheets seem to be the best choice. One guy has good vids on this (and a few choice words for Nate). IIRC, he calls his "V-towers. He starts the seeds directly in them by using an absorbent wick along the length in the center (concept is clear in video. I'll get the link if you want it.) Murry Hallman (spell?, aquaponics guy) has a version he calls GroPockets (or something similar). The water is fish waste, but, as I recall, he does use sprinkler heads. I actually tried to make a version of this, but w/o proper bracing, found it VERY hazardous to try to cut big circular holes in PVC. I much prefer the versions that just use one straight cut-out along the length.

    Alternatively, If you just run the towers horizontally, you could probably get away with WM craft section poly batting for stuffing pillows, instead of having to source the pond filter. The stiffness of the pond filter supports the plants, but they probably would sit upright in a horizontal pipe just fine with batting. For that matter, lava rock (don't forget the wick) might be a good choice here.

    Here, we are really between aero, and hydro, since the roots are mostly growing in air, even though the water is not delivered via pressurized sprinkler head.
    Last edited by Faroe; 06-14-2016 at 10:53 AM.

  32. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by China Connection View Post


    https://www.amazon.com/Now-Foods-Liq.../dp/B00Q6P1JNU


    A few drops of this will work wonders.
    Some people just use epsom salts, although I haven't tried it.

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    S. Texas
    Posts
    9,894
    Clicking around chasing interesting links, I often find myself, at first surprisingly, in a mary jane growers forum.

    Those guys have really advanced the hydroponic growing science big time, and some aeroponic, too, especially
    growing inside w/ lights.

    I don't know how scarce food (or munchies, in this case) would have to get before any of them would flip over to
    also doing some serious food production, but they would be an army of competent growers if they ever chose to.

    - Shane
    Last edited by shane; 06-14-2016 at 11:19 AM.

    THE GOOD NEWS ABOUT NUCLEAR DESTRUCTION!
    WHAT TO DO IF A NUCLEAR DISASTER IS IMMINENT!
    When An ill Wind Blows From Afar! (Overseas Fallout)

    "A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them;
    the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences."
    - Proverbs 22:3

  34. #34
    I bought several $1 laundry baskets this spring. The plants are doing well in them, but the landscape liner I used inside and out is already shot and in tatters. Doesn't really seem to matter, the plants are doing fine. I use a sock for the wick rather than a pipe. That way, you can set the pot down anywhere, w/o the problem of a pipe sticking out of the bottom.

    It is nice not to have to drill lots of holes into the sides of a perfectly good WM pastry bucket. However, the plastic in my laundry baskets is VERY flimsy, and I'm not sure they will actually last the season in our sun. I hope they last, I do like them.

    Big holes in the pot are good when your soil is heavy. I refuse to buy soil, but you can end up with a very heavy mucky anaerobic mess if you just fill a five gallon bucket with garden soil and compost. The plants won't grow if the roots can't get air.

  35. #35
    The product I posted has about 81 minerals in it.

    Growing in an open mix and foliar fertilizing with a hydropic mix will prove to be the best way to go.

  36. #36
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    S. Texas
    Posts
    9,894
    This video is interesting, teenagers comparing earth grown to hydroponic to aeroponic (via ultra-sonic transducer)...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U2EzPN3rIn4

    - Shane

    THE GOOD NEWS ABOUT NUCLEAR DESTRUCTION!
    WHAT TO DO IF A NUCLEAR DISASTER IS IMMINENT!
    When An ill Wind Blows From Afar! (Overseas Fallout)

    "A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them;
    the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences."
    - Proverbs 22:3

  37. #37
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    639
    How do you start your seedlings to adapted to aeroponics?
    I planted seeds into a coco media worm composted base, small plug till gemmated pass the second set of leaves. I then put them into a net basket containing gravel that is just large enough so it doesn’t fall out the webbing. Been low pressure aeroponics 15 sec on 15 min off with well water.
    The problem they’re growing but a much slower rate than the potted ones. Same well water. Same plug size.

    A batch before it failed. What was different I used a hydro fish base supplement an OMRI listed. What I determine that I had a nutrient lockout because of high PH over 7. Also which shouldn’t a factor high pressure misting.

  38. #38
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    S. Texas
    Posts
    9,894
    Timber,

    I start them in the little Grodan rockwool cubes and next batch I'm going to
    prepare cubes and 'air prune' roots like described here before transplanting...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ajQyY6OVb8

    I've seen some also say need more diluted nutrient solution with aeroponics.

    - Shane

    THE GOOD NEWS ABOUT NUCLEAR DESTRUCTION!
    WHAT TO DO IF A NUCLEAR DISASTER IS IMMINENT!
    When An ill Wind Blows From Afar! (Overseas Fallout)

    "A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them;
    the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences."
    - Proverbs 22:3

  39. #39
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    639
    Shane,
    I have done rockwool with success, but looking into different media that I can obtain in a pinch. What I found by experimenting that the media round the root system has to be a very firm cell, and allow root growth to penetrate it to establish a good root growth. I was using #8 gravel as the holes in the mesh pot baskets would retain most of the stones. It works but it I need to find a better media.

    I have a question on nutrients in the water. What do you aeroponics growers use??
    I see CC with the trace minerals that very beneficial for the plant but most important that the increased mineral content in the plant will benefit the person eating it. I'm trying to blend organic fertilizer in a tea mesh bag concept for now.

  40. #40
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    S. Texas
    Posts
    9,894
    Quote Originally Posted by Timber View Post
    Shane,
    I have done rockwool with success, but looking into different media that I can obtain in a pinch. What I found by experimenting that the media round the root system has to be a very firm cell, and allow root growth to penetrate it to establish a good root growth. I was using #8 gravel as the holes in the mesh pot baskets would retain most of the stones. It works but it I need to find a better media.

    I have a question on nutrients in the water. What do you aeroponics growers use??
    Pretty much the same as what hydroponics use, just making sure well dissolved not to plug up misting jets.

    Also, seem to be more diluted, with maybe 5 seconds spraying and five minutes drying out before repeating.

    Since first posting thread, been building mobile insulated year round greenhouse that when moved & parked
    in final destination, with its expandable side out, is 400 sq ft w/ 10' walls and 4,000 cubic feet internally. All
    vertical aeroponics in closed CO2 infused environment. About 3 weeks away from completion now, hopefully.

    Some photos of grow barrels, plumbing & mobile greenhouse before foaming touch-up & painting last month...

    barrells.jpg

    plumbing.jpg

    south_side.jpg

    north-wall.jpg

    The 35' trailer frame was free junk out of a friends field, added my own wheels/tires I already had and will get back off it
    when final destination reached. Heavy frame welding done cheap next door at friends outfit, the smaller stuff welded here.
    5" insulated freezer panels were 50 cents sq ft, thank you craigs list. East, West, South sides open like draw bridges and
    will all have reflective mylar attached on their insides, greenhouse diffused poly will seal up those openings for CO2 inside.
    1/3rd of roof along north side opens w/ reflective mylar on underside. Lot's more going on, too, for all the environmental
    internal controls, that's all solar powered with pallet load of 26 290watt panels I'd picked up for less than 30 cents/watt.

    Trying to save $ wherever I can cause these projects inevitably always end up costing more time/money/energy than my
    best guess on paper when designing.

    - Shane
    Last edited by shane; 04-23-2017 at 06:00 PM.

    THE GOOD NEWS ABOUT NUCLEAR DESTRUCTION!
    WHAT TO DO IF A NUCLEAR DISASTER IS IMMINENT!
    When An ill Wind Blows From Afar! (Overseas Fallout)

    "A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them;
    the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences."
    - Proverbs 22:3

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts


NOTICE: Timebomb2000 is an Internet forum for discussion of world events and personal disaster preparation. Membership is by request only. The opinions posted do not necessarily represent those of TB2K Incorporated (the owner of this website), the staff or site host. Responsibility for the content of all posts rests solely with the Member making them. Neither TB2K Inc, the Staff nor the site host shall be liable for any content.

All original member content posted on this forum becomes the property of TB2K Inc. for archival and display purposes on the Timebomb2000 website venue. Said content may be removed or edited at staff discretion. The original authors retain all rights to their material outside of the Timebomb2000.com website venue. Publication of any original material from Timebomb2000.com on other websites or venues without permission from TB2K Inc. or the original author is expressly forbidden.



"Timebomb2000", "TB2K" and "Watching the World Tick Away" are Service Mark℠ TB2K, Inc. All Rights Reserved.