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DISASTER We're all gonna die dept. - CA won't be providing water to contractors
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  1. #1
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    4 We're all gonna die dept. - CA won't be providing water to contractors

    1m
    California water officials say they will cut delivery as drought deepens -
    @BloombergNews

    ----------

    California Water Officials Cut Delivery as State Drought Deepens


    Jan 31, 2014 2:49 PM ET

    Officials in drought-stricken California said that for the first time in the state’s history, they won’t be able to provide any water to contractors that supply two-thirds of the population and a million acres of farmland.

    The California Department of Water Resources, which had predicted it would be able to supply about 5 percent of the amount requested, said it now projects that it won’t be able to provide any of the 4 million acre-feet of water sought by local agencies. An acre-foot is the volume needed to cover an acre of land one foot deep with water.

    The reduction means that agencies will have to rely on existing water supplies such as ground water or what is in storage behind damns. The Los Angeles-based Metropolitan Water District, serving 19 million people in Southern California, and the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, which supplies much of the Bay Area, have built up water reserves and won’t be as hard hit as places such as Sacramento and the Central Valley farming region.

    About two-thirds of Californians get at least part of their water from northern mountain rains and snow through a network of reservoirs and aqueducts known as the State Water Project, according to the Water Resources Department, the state’s largest water supplier.

    The system serves households and businesses from the San Francisco Bay area to Southern California and irrigates crops in the San Joaquin Valley near the center of the state -- the world’s most productive agricultural region.

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-0...t-deepens.html

    So when's the Revolution? God or Money? Choose.

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by mzkitty View Post
    what is in storage behind damns.
    If it passes spell-check, it must be right.

  3. #3
    My local natural food store all ready imports lots of produce from S. America and other foreign exporters..........how much fresh organic produce will I be buying when broccoli is $3.49 a lb, a 4 lb. bag of oranges is $5.98, and peppers are just about $4-5 a lb??????????

    Cauliflower is over $2 a lb........and a head of Foxy Org. iceberg lettuce is $2.49...........yikes.............this is a stupid dangerous move..........California is our fresh produce cornucopia.........
    Sapphire

    myopically challenged

  4. #4
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    All around bad situation.

    The Sierra Mountain snowpack is around 11% of where it usually is this time of year. Part of that water flows into CA, and part of it flows into NV. We are feeling it on our side, as well. But we don't really have farmland to speak of on this side.
    "There are 100 MILLION people who own 300 MILLION guns in this country. There are BILLIONS of rounds in private hands as well. It is a logistical impossibility to overcome those numbers. If 1 gun was confiscated every minute (every hour, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week) it would take 208,333 days to do it. That is 570 years." --JoshInReno

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by SAPPHIRE View Post
    . ..........California is our fresh produce cornucopia.........
    not anymore.

    I don't need a Catch-phrase. I'm Satanta. A Catch-phrase needs me.

    "It ain't no secret I didn't get these scars falling over in church."



    http://chronart.wix.com/chronart

  6. #6
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    http://www.water.ca.gov/news/

    DWR Drops State Water Project Allocation to Zero, Seeks to Preserve Remaining Supplies Severe Drought Leads to Worst-Ever Water Supply Outlook

    SACRAMENTO – To protect Californians’ health and safety from more severe water shortages in the months ahead, the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) today took actions to conserve the state’s precious resources. As a result, everyone – farmers, fish, and people in our cities and towns – will get less water. DWR’s actions are in direct response to Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr.’s drought State of Emergency. In the declaration, the Governor directed DWR and the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) to act to modify requirements that hinder conservation of currently stored water and allow flexibility within the state’s water system to maintain operations and meet environmental needs.

    “The harsh weather leaves us little choice,” said DWR Director Mark Cowin. “If we are to have any hope of coping with continued dry weather and balancing multiple needs, we must act now to preserve what water remains in our reservoirs.”

    Except for a small amount of carryover water from 2013, customers of the State Water Project (SWP) will get no deliveries in 2014 if current dry conditions persist and deliveries to agricultural districts with long-standing water rights in the Sacramento Valley may be cut 50 percent – the maximum permitted by contract – depending upon future snow survey results. It is important to note that almost all areas served by the SWP have other sources of water, such as groundwater, local reservoirs, and other supplies.

    “It is our duty to give State Water Project customers a realistic understanding of how much water they will receive from the Project,” said Director Cowin. “Simply put, there’s not enough water in the system right now for customers to expect any water this season from the project.”

    DWR also has asked the SWRCB to adjust water permit terms that control State Water Project and federal Central Valley Project operations in order to preserve dwindling supplies in upstream reservoirs for farms, fisheries, and cities and towns as the drought continues.

    While additional winter storms may provide a limited boost to reservoir storage and water deliveries, it would need to rain and snow heavily every other day from now until May to get us back to average annual rain and snowfall. Even then, California still would be in a drought, because normally wet December and January have been critically dry – and follow a record dry 2013 and a dry 2012.

    This historic announcement reflects the severity of California’s drought. After two previous dry years, 2014 is shaping up as the driest in state history. Storage in key reservoirs now is lower than at this time in 1977, one of the two previous driest water years on record. Yesterday’s Sierra snow survey found the snowpack’s statewide water content at only 12 percent of average for this time of year.

    Lake Oroville in Butte County, the principal SWP reservoir, is at 36 percent of its 3.5 million acre-foot capacity (55 percent of its historical average for the date). Shasta Lake north of Redding, California’s and the federal Central Valley Project’s (CVP) largest reservoir, is at 36 percent of its 4.5 million acre-foot capacity (54 percent of average for the date). San Luis Reservoir, a critical south-of-Delta reservoir for both the SWP and CVP, is at a mere 30 percent of its 2 million acre-foot capacity (39 percent of average for the date).

    Key facts on water deliveries and impacts:
    • Never before in the 54-year history of the State Water Project has DWR announced a zero allocation to all 29 public water agencies that buy from the SWP. These deliveries help supply water to 25 million Californians and roughly 750,000 acres of irrigated farmland.
    • Deliveries to senior water rights holders in the Sacramento Valley – all agricultural irrigation districts – were last cut in 1992.
    • The only previous State Water Project zero percent allocation was in 1991 for agriculture, but cities that year received 30 percent of requested allocations.
    • “Carryover” water stored by local agencies and water transferred from willing sellers to buyers in critically short areas still will be delivered, as will emergency supplies for drinking, sanitation, and fire protection.

    Regulatory Actions Sought

    In a formal petition delivered earlier this week, DWR and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) asked the SWRCB to adjust requirements for freshwater outflow in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta in order to preserve stored water that may be needed later in the year for health and safety needs and to provide cold water upstream for protection of salmon and other species. The existing Delta water quality standards, contained in Water Rights Decision 1641, were not written with these extraordinarily dry conditions in mind. The DWR and Reclamation petition seeks adjustment to the water quality and flow requirements for February, along with a request to establish a framework to make further requests and adjustments as the drought evolves.

    The petition also seeks flexibility in management of a water quality regulation that requires closure of the Cross-Channel Gates along the Sacramento River near Walnut Grove from February 1 through May 20. Under the current extremely low flow conditions, open gates can help ameliorate salty conditions in the Delta. DWR and Reclamation propose to close the gates should storm runoff boost flows or if fish monitoring indicates closure is needed to protect threatened species.

    Water rights permits require the SWP, operated by DWR, and the CVP, operated by Reclamation, to ensure that outflow from the Delta meets an average of 7,100 cubic feet per second (cfs) beginning February 1. Outflow is composed of flows from all tributaries to the Delta, some of which are directly controlled by DWR and Reclamation.

    Under the petition, DWR and Reclamation project that outflows will be able to meet an average of 4,500 cfs during February, which is the level currently being achieved in January. To help meet this level of outflow, DWR and Reclamation will export from the Delta a maximum of 1,500 cfs, which will be used to serve
    health and safety needs.

    The petitioners note that they do not believe there is an adequate water supply to meet all obligations under the SWRCB’s Water Rights Decision 1641. Without adjustment, “there exists a substantial risk that by late spring 2014 and into 2015 the Projects’ major reservoirs will be drafted to dead pool or near dead pool levels at which point reservoir release capacities will be substantially diminished.” Dead pool level refers to the condition when water can no longer be released from a reservoir using gravity.

    The petition seeks to minimize adverse impacts to the cold water stored in reservoirs for downstream fisheries and to allow for some level of salinity control later in the season. Otherwise, water project operators risk losing entirely the ability to control salinity in the Delta.

    “As Governor Brown has directed, we will work closely with our state, federal and local partners to meet health and safety needs and deliver what water is available to critically dry areas,” said Director Cowin. “Even though it’s dry everywhere, California agencies have traditionally been willing to transfer any water they can spare to more needy areas. Today is a stark reminder that we all have to save every drop we can in our homes and places of work. Conservation is always important, but today it’s an absolute necessity.”

    In addition to the actions announced today, Reclamation yesterday decided to preserve rescheduled water supplies that CVP farmers had banked as a hedge against dry conditions. Director Cowin praised the decision, saying: “In an increasingly complex situation, affirming the ability of water districts to preserve water supplies as a hedge against drought is good water management.”

    Authority for Changes

    California law authorizes the SWRCB to grant temporary changes in permits when it finds an urgent need for the change and the change can be made without injury to other lawful users of water or without unreasonably affecting fish, wildlife, or other instream beneficial uses. The law requires consultation with representatives of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. The change must also be found to be in the public interest.

    Water Allocation History

    In December, DWR estimated it would be able to deliver 5 percent of the slightly more than 4 million acre-feet of State Water Project water requested this year by the 29 public water agencies that purchase water from the project. They are located in Northern California, the Bay Area, San Joaquin Valley, Central Coast, and Southern California.

    The 5 percent projected allocation– now reduced to zero – tied with calendar year 2010 for the lowest initial allocation ever. The initial 2010 delivery estimate, made on the heels of the 2007-2009 drought, was eventually increased to 50 percent as winter storms developed.

    The final SWP allocation for calendar year 2013 was 35 percent of requested water amounts. In 2012, the final allocation was 65 percent. It was 80 percent in 2011, up dramatically from an initial allocation of 25 percent. The final allocation was 50 percent in 2010, 40 percent in 2009, 35 percent in 2008, and 60 percent in 2007. The last 100 percent allocation – difficult to achieve even in wet years because of Delta pumping restrictions to protect threatened and endangered fish – was in 2006.

    The federal CVP, which supplies much of the state’s agricultural water, is expected to announce its initial allocation next month. It also will be dismal, especially for irrigation-dependent farms on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley.

    Water-short Valley farmers are expected to fallow thousands of acres, sending negative economic ripples through communities dependent on the agricultural economy.

    Farmers also will pump increasing amounts of groundwater, further depleting overtapped aquifers. Governor Brown directed DWR to monitor groundwater levels, land subsidence and land fallowing as the drought persists.

    Conservation Key

    ”We need everyone in every part of the state to conserve water,” said Governor Brown in his January 22 State of the State address.

    When Governor Brown declared a drought State of Emergency earlier this month, he directed state officials to take all necessary actions to prepare for water shortages. This week, CAL FIRE announced it hired 125 additional firefighters to help address the increased fire threat due to drought conditions, the California Department of Public Health identified and offered assistance to communities at risk of severe drinking water shortages and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife restricted fishing on some waterways due to low water flows worsened by the drought. Also this week, the California Natural Resources Agency, the California Environmental Protection Agency and the California Department of Food and Agriculture also released the California Water Action Plan, which will guide state efforts to enhance water supply reliability, restore damaged and destroyed ecosystems and improve the resilience of our infrastructure.

    Governor Brown has called on all Californians to voluntarily reduce their water usage by 20 percent and the Save Our Water campaign has announced four new public service announcements that encourage residents to conserve. Last December, the Governor formed a Drought Task Force to review expected water allocations and California’s preparedness for water scarcity. In May 2013, Governor Brown issued an Executive Order to direct state water officials to expedite the review and processing of voluntary transfers of water.
    Frederick Douglas stated, "Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did, and it never will. Find out just what people will submit to, and you have found out the exact amount of injustice and wrong which will be imposed upon them; and these will continue until they are resisted with either words or blows, or with both. The limits of tyrants are prescribed by the endurance of those whom they oppress."

  7. #7
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    Broccoli sucks anyways.

    (it really doesn't but because Chewbacca likes it, I can say that now)
    "I've always wondered what the 1920's and 1930's were like, but I never wanted to see it from the German perspective....."
    -John Galt, www.johngaltfla.com

  8. #8
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    We were over in Cali the past several days. While the vegetable crops look ok now because of irrigation, the surrounding hills and pastures are so burned up and brown there is not a blade of grass on them. The ranchers are feeding hay to the cattle. We passed by one place selling hay, and the prices were unreal. $18 a bale for alfalfa, and $16 a bale for grass hay. Also stopped at a few veggie stands and the prices were a lot higher than normal. Quality didn't look as good either, and usually the veggies there are amazing.
    May God be with us in the coming days

  9. #9
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    This is not going to end well, I know many hate california but a good chunk of our fruits and veggies are grown there, time to pray up some rain for cali! Btw SA is now moving into drought conditions as per Market to Market this evening (PBS).

    K-

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by packyderms_wife View Post
    This is not going to end well, I know many hate california but a good chunk of our fruits and veggies are grown there, time to pray up some rain for cali! Btw SA is now moving into drought conditions as per Market to Market this evening (PBS).

    K-
    I wish I could offer sympathies but I'm too busy picking my own fruits and veggies. It would help if the sheeple got off their ass and LEARNED how to grow necessities like vegetables in ANY conditions...
    "I've always wondered what the 1920's and 1930's were like, but I never wanted to see it from the German perspective....."
    -John Galt, www.johngaltfla.com

  11. #11
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    About 7 1/2-8 miles west, some people brought goats. A lot! Normally be pretty good, but too dry now for anything for them to eat! They hauled them away.
    "all they that hate Me love death." Proverbs 8:36. "Why do the heathen rage, and the people image a vain thing? The kings of the earth set themselves and the rulers take counsel together against the LORD and against His Anointed." Ps 2:1,2."The agencies of evil are combining and consolidating, they are strengthening for the last great crisis."

  12. #12
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    California has been denying water for a long time. Things like bait fish take priority over people.


    Time to reset.
    Turning and turning in the widening gyre
    The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
    Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
    Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
    The Second Coming by WB Yeats


  13. #13
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    I know the first place they need to turn off the water is on the golf courses. Insane to allow watering them and not crops.
    May God be with us in the coming days

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by rafter View Post
    I know the first place they need to turn off the water is on the golf courses. Insane to allow watering them and not crops.
    Got keep the well to do distracted by social activities so that they think they are above it all. Lets do 18 to take your mind off the stress of daily life.
    "There are those who said that this day would never come, what are they to say now?" - Unknown Covenant Prophet, Halo 2 trailer.

    Only A Mule is Positive. Keep An Open Mind. - Unknown

  15. #15
    Here in the desert my pet peeve for years has been the acres of lawns at the schools. The local high school has a green belt between the street and sidewalk on a slope that water runs off of into the street.

    Drive into any shopping center at 4 in the morning on the main drag and see the water running everywhere. Every business has something growing along the sidewalk that the irrigation leaks water into the street.

    And if that wasn't bad enough, antiquated water pipes are bursting constantly in the residential neighborhoods flooding everything out.

    The local city govts need to get a grip on the water situation but oh no. We who like to garden will be the ones as usual to foot the bill and feel the pain one way or another.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnGaltfla View Post
    I wish I could offer sympathies but I'm too busy picking my own fruits and veggies. It would help if the sheeple got off their ass and LEARNED how to grow necessities like vegetables in ANY conditions...
    We've been trying here in central iowa, unfortunately just like Cali we are in extreme drought conditions and have been for the past couple of years. Extreme drought conditions make gardening nigh impossible.

    K-

  17. #17
    No joke. Most of the highly broadcasted things are so trivial. The really important losses, like water, freedom, and food aren't noticed by the MSM.

  18. #18
    We have been gardening in the desert for years. During summer months we pay close to 500.00 a month for water. We supply fruits and veggies to most of the neighborhood but I got a feeling this year we will have to scale down our garden. We already have 1000 onions planted so hope they don't turn off the water.
    I am going to start fighting back before they do though. We are friends with a reporter for the local paper and I am going to be sending in pictures of all the wasted water that should be turned off.

    And John Galt needs to get off his high horse. There are many preppers in California that don't sit on their ass but work it off growing food. I can't see that the rest of this country is so well off either. Better we pull together but of course we won't.
    The bitch in Wash. Counts on that.

  19. #19
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    The State of Infrastructure resonates through so many topics on this forum.

    Both public and private interests neglect infrastructure until some sort of avoidable "crisis" develops and the tax/rate payers have to bail out poor decisions by the "leadership" which have looted the coffers for short term financial and political gain.
    "The most intriguing point for the historian is that where history and legend meet."

    "None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who think they are free."

    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

  20. #20
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    Cliff Collipriest
    • a day ago

    This is the worst drought in California's history and there is currently no relief in sight. Current forecast models indicate the earliest the state will see significant (meaning enough effect to increase water supplies) rainfall will not be until fall of this year.
    Former KGB Agent Yuri Bezmenov Explains Our Four Stages – “The New Normal”… http://theconservativetreehouse.com/...-new-normal-2/

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sleeping Cobra View Post
    Cliff Collipriest
    • a day ago

    This is the worst drought in California's history and there is currently no relief in sight. Current forecast models indicate the earliest the state will see significant (meaning enough effect to increase water supplies) rainfall will not be until fall of this year.
    I would say it's the worst drought in modern history, I'm betting the geological record reveals that there have been far worse droughts in the past.

    K-

  22. #22
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    Sure glad I have a garden

    I carry your heart with me, I carry it in my heart.

    @FatTurkeyFarm on twitter

  23. #23
    We are in Oregon where the drought level is considered "Severe." We have had fairly large gardens every year watered by well water, but we are concerned about the well going dry. I will be learning how to grow with minimum water and maybe maximum spacing in a smaller garden. I hope to have enough fresh stuff for the summer, but it might be a year where there's nothing to can. I have some books by Solomon about gardening with minimum water, but I wonder if there is information any of the rest of you have which may be of help to us all. Thanks in advance, for information, forums or book titles which might be helpful.

    Pinecone

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Pinecone View Post
    We are in Oregon where the drought level is considered "Severe." We have had fairly large gardens every year watered by well water, but we are concerned about the well going dry. I will be learning how to grow with minimum water and maybe maximum spacing in a smaller garden. I hope to have enough fresh stuff for the summer, but it might be a year where there's nothing to can. I have some books by Solomon about gardening with minimum water, but I wonder if there is information any of the rest of you have which may be of help to us all. Thanks in advance, for information, forums or book titles which might be helpful.

    Pinecone
    Pinecone, look up a group down in Willits, Ca called Ecology Action. They have been working on a gardening technique called Grow Biointensive since the early seventies. One of the key points of this method is minimal water use. I have been using this method since the late 80's with great success although, fortunately for me, never in an environment where water is in short supply.

    PM me if you have questions.

  25. #25
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    It is dry, dry, dry here. My concern is that we will loose the orchards and vineyards in many areas of the state. Those will take 3-15 years to be replanted and come back into full production. We are on a spring and I really hope it doesn't run dry this summer. My plan is to remove all the vegetation in the area around the spring to see if that helps improve the flow. Along with that there is lots of work to do clearing the brush and dead wood on the hill below the house. This is really scary. We've had 3.36 inches of rain in the last 12 months and most of that was in March of last year. This is not a particularly dry part of the state. When the oak and madrone trees start dieing we will see some horrific wild land fires and as a volunteer FF it looks to be a very busy summer.

    Fortunately we have about 7500 gal of water storage on the ranch so we can go for a while with minimal usage if the spring runs dry.

    Please pray for rain.
    Tom Reed

    Ignorant and free has never been and never will be. Thomas Jefferson

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by packyderms_wife View Post
    I would say it's the worst drought in modern history, I'm betting the geological record reveals that there have been far worse droughts in the past.

    K-
    I believe I heard that this is Kali's worst drought since the 100+ year drought in the 1500s. The entire Southwest US and Texas was in devastating drought then. I hope to God that it doesn't spread east again. We still haven't recovered from the last three droughts here.
    "You never had the things you thought you should have had and you'll not get them now..."

  27. #27
    The Dustbowl with look like the Amazon River Basin when this "Great Dessication of America" gets done.

  28. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by rafter View Post
    I know the first place they need to turn off the water is on the golf courses. Insane to allow watering them and not crops.
    Rafter, when you were here in Colorado during the drought years did you ever see a brown golf course? No. There is no way they will stop watering golf courses. They will starve to death complaining but the golf course will be green.

  29. #29
    I will be setting up a trickle irrigation system to our garden. Very similar to what Israel uses. We have been dry for some time but are now getting snow. Still we use our well for garden and house some livestock. We will try to save every little bit we can for food production this year.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by SquonkHunter View Post
    I believe I heard that this is Kali's worst drought since the 100+ year drought in the 1500s. The entire Southwest US and Texas was in devastating drought then. I hope to God that it doesn't spread east again. We still haven't recovered from the last three droughts here.
    The past 500 years is what I consider modern history. 4K years ago entire people groups got up and abandoned the SW part of the US, Mexico, and western South America all the way over to the east coast of Brazil. All because of drought! It was at about this same time that the Navajo (Dine), who used to reside in the artic regions started migrating southward making their way over a 400 year time frame towards the American Southwest. Note that also the Romans started migrating northward into northern Europe at about this same time, entire areas in Africa became devoid of humans due to excessive drought. Research the Silk Road into China and learn about how entire people groups along the way vanished and popped up in other areas.

    Another words while this current situation sucks and big time, stop watering those stupid lawns and golf courses, use that water for food crops, etc. 4K years ago the Romans built aquaducts from northern France all the way sought to Rome just so they could flush their loos! Yes 4k years ago the Romans had flushing toilets.

    NOTE that if you read the poems, writings, of the sages from 4K years ago the Sun bore a VERY similar appearance to what it does today. Bright white, piercing, and you get burnt much quicker than in times past.

    K-

  31. #31
    Slatewiper, thanks, I'll check them out tomorrow.

    Bubble Head. I'll look that up, too. Thanks. I've been using soaker hoses, but it still used a lot of water.

    Pachy, history can be depressing!

    Buttie, you have my prayers for rain! A few years ago a tree limb randomly fell across power lines across the street, which not only made a transformer spark, but the lines fell across New Zealand fencing which arced as well into drying tall grass which used to be managed pasture. Fortunately, our only close neighbor heard the popping and called 911 within a minute of the initial event. The winds were carrying it towards us. It was scary fast. Fortunately, eight fire trucks arrived quickly and put all the fires out. DH and I talked later that evening, and we decided we would have had only enough time to grab the animals and vehicles and run. AFTER that, I made up BOB's. We had never planned on evacuating, but we had never planned on wildfire here either. We, too, are doing brush control now. Prayers for no wildfires in your area. It is scary.

    Pinecone

  32. #32
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    Of course we are all going to die. Just not today.
    ..

    .
    .
    "The karma café has no menu......You get served what you deserve!"


    ".Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in, broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, WOW, What a ride!"

    Personal Responsibility..The one thing no one can take away from you

    ."The only tyrant I accept in this world is the still, small voice within me."

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by SquonkHunter View Post
    I believe I heard that this is Kali's worst drought since the 100+ year drought in the 1500s. The entire Southwest US and Texas was in devastating drought then. I hope to God that it doesn't spread east again. We still haven't recovered from the last three droughts here.

    Kali

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    Kālī (Sanskrit: काली, IPA: [kɑːliː]), also known as Kālikā (Sanskrit: कालिका), is the Hindu goddess associated with death, shakti. The name Kali comes from kāla, which means black, time, death, lord of death, Shiva. Since Shiva is called Kāla—the eternal time—Kālī, his consort, also means "Time" or "Death" (as in time has come). Hence, Kāli is the Goddess of Time and Change. Although sometimes presented as dark and violent, her earliest incarnation as a figure of annihilation of evil forces still has some influence. Various Shakta Hindu cosmologies, as well as Shākta Tantric beliefs, worship her as the ultimate reality or Brahman. She is also revered as Bhavatārini (literally "redeemer of the universe"). Comparatively recent devotional movements largely conceive Kāli as a benevolent mother goddess.[1] Kālī is represented as the consort of Lord Shiva, on whose body she is often seen standing. Shiva lies in the path of Kali, whose foot on Shiva subdues her anger. She is the fierce aspect of the goddess Durga (Parvati).[2]
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    "The karma café has no menu......You get served what you deserve!"


    ".Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in, broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, WOW, What a ride!"

    Personal Responsibility..The one thing no one can take away from you

    ."The only tyrant I accept in this world is the still, small voice within me."

  34. #34
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Grand Canyon National Park
    Posts
    9,295
    Quote Originally Posted by Bubble Head View Post
    Rafter, when you were here in Colorado during the drought years did you ever see a brown golf course? No. There is no way they will stop watering golf courses. They will starve to death complaining but the golf course will be green.
    Oh yeah I remember. There were odd and even days to water, but they didn't want you to do that either. But of course the golf courses were exempt. Sad.
    May God be with us in the coming days

  35. #35
    Join Date
    May 2004
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    Sandhills North Carolina
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    The California Curse
    January 24, 2014 • 20 minutes
    The dry spell in the western half of the country may be the worst in centuries.
    During the 1960s California was the place to be. People flocked to California from all over America. It grew at a rate three times faster than the rest of the nation. But by the end of the 60s, the California dream was turning into a nightmare. Divorce rates exploded, gang violence surged, and numerous weather disasters plagued the state. How did a place so prosperous become so cursed?
    Here are the articles referenced on today’s program:



    CBS: “California Dry Spell May Be Worst Since 1500s”
    The Economic Collapse: “U.S. Cattle Herd Is At A 61 Year Low”

  36. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by SAPPHIRE View Post
    My local natural food store all ready imports lots of produce from S. America and other foreign exporters..........how much fresh organic produce will I be buying when broccoli is $3.49 a lb, a 4 lb. bag of oranges is $5.98, and peppers are just about $4-5 a lb??????????

    Cauliflower is over $2 a lb........and a head of Foxy Org. iceberg lettuce is $2.49...........yikes.............this is a stupid dangerous move..........California is our fresh produce cornucopia.........

    look to Mexico and South America (Peru & Argentina) for fresh produce

    The Calif State Water project in the first time in it's 54 year history will provide NO water to urban residents and agriculture.... per SJ Mercury News, front page article Feb 1st, 2014.

    According to a side bar in the article the Calif State Water project covers 21 dams, 701 miles of pipes, 23mil people and 750,000 acres of farmland.

  37. #37
    Join Date
    May 2004
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    Sandhills North Carolina
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    Quote Originally Posted by Double_A View Post
    look to Mexico and South America (Peru & Argentina) for fresh produce....
    the continued destruction of the Amazon Rain Forest to create monoculture farms for global shipping and produce......
    which is to be paid for by the global warming 'taxes' to create the new farms
    which will profit the Charter Members of the Chicago Bank that consist of Al Gore, Pelosi, Soros etc

  38. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    527
    In the past 12 hours the North SF Bay area has received 0.18 inches of rain and we are thankful. I was walking on the remnants of the lawn yesterday and it was crunching under foot. Not looking good on the long range forecast.

    Pinecone - Add on to to your investigation list an item called 'T tape' for drip irrigation. It is a flat ribbon tube that has emitters in it every 12 inches or so, and runs on a low pressure manifold. Back when, I market farmed with a 10 gallon/ minute well and buried that below the rows of veggies so they got direct water. Amazing how little water it took to keep those veggies happy. Worth looking into. Good Luck

  39. #39
    Living in a area that depends on importing water is probably not a good idea.

    What do I take from this:

    Make the garden even bigger, need more canning jars, get used to eating local.

    Not a bad plan anyway as things continue to move the directions they are headed.

    Xin Loi commiefornia.
    Dosadi

    III

  40. #40
    Food is already so expensive, if it wasn't for our home canning and hunting I'm not sure what we would do most weeks. Hate to see what prices will be after this.

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