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HEALTH Want $3,000? Under 50? Volunteer to let the government give you the Flu.
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  1. #1
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    Sep 2004
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    Want $3,000? Under 50? Volunteer to let the government give you the Flu.

    I'm too old, but if I was young, I would be afraid, very afraid of this.

    I never thought about it before, but before someone with the flu ever sees a medical person, the infection is well under way by then.


    http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories...01-26-11-09-27
    Jan 26, 11:09 AM EST

    Want to get the flu? Volunteers sneeze for science
    By LAURAN NEERGAARD
    AP Medical Writer


    AP Photo/Charles Dharapak


    BETHESDA, Md. (AP) -- Forget being sneezed on: Government scientists are deliberately giving dozens of volunteers the flu by squirting the live virus straight up their noses.
    It may sound bizarre, but the rare type of research is a step in the quest for better flu vaccines. It turns out that how the body fends off influenza remains something of a mystery.

    "Vaccines are working, but we could do better," said Dr. Matthew Memoli of the National Institutes of Health, who is leading the study that aims to infect up to 100 adults over the next year.

    Wait a minute: Flu is sweeping the country, so why not just study the already sick? That wouldn't let scientists measure how the immune system reacts through each step of infection, starting with that first exposure to the virus.

    It's not an experiment to be taken lightly. After all, the flu kills thousands of Americans a year. For safety, Memoli chose a dose that produces mild to moderate symptoms - and accepts only volunteers who are healthy and no older than 50.
    And to avoid spreading the germs, participants must spend at least nine days quarantined inside a special isolation ward at the NIH hospital, their health closely monitored. They're not released until nasal tests prove they're no longer contagious.
    The incentive: About $3,000 to compensate for their time.

    "I received a very scolding email from my mother" about signing up, Daniel Bennett, 26, said with a grin.
    "Their standards are so high, I don't believe I'm in danger," added Bennett, a restaurant worker from College Park, Md. "I don't get sick that often."
    A masked and gloved Memoli had Bennett lie flat for about a minute.
    "It will taste salty. Some will drip down the back of your throat," Memoli said, before squeezing a syringe filled with millions of microscopic virus particles, floating in salt water, into each nostril.
    Sure enough, a few days later Bennett had the runny nose and achiness of mild flu.
    The best defense against influenza is a yearly vaccine, but it's far from perfect. In fact, the vaccine is least effective in people age 65 and older - the group most susceptible to flu - probably because the immune system weakens with age.

    Understanding how younger adults' bodies fight flu may help scientists determine what the more vulnerable elderly are missing, clues to help develop more protective vaccines for everyone, Memoli explained.
    Here's the issue: The vaccine is designed to raise people's levels of a particular flu-fighting antibody. It targets a protein that acts like the virus' coat, called hemagglutinin - the "H" in H1N1, the strain that caused the 2009 pandemic and that is causing the most illness so far this winter, too.

    But it's not clear what antibody level is best to aim for - or whether a certain amount means you're protected against getting sick at all, or that you'd get a mild case instead of a severe one.
    "As mind-boggling as it is, we don't know the answer to that," said Dr. Anthony Fauci, chief of NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. "We made some assumptions that we knew everything about flu."
    Just targeting hemagglutinin probably isn't enough, Memoli added. Already, some people in his study didn't get sick, despite remarkably low antibody levels, meaning something else must be protecting them.

    Could it be antibodies against the "N" in flu's name, the neuraminidase protein? Specific T cells that are activated to fight infection? Genes that switch on and off when a virus invades?

    To begin finding out, Memoli first developed a laboratory-grown copy of the H1N1 flu strain and sprayed different amounts into volunteers' noses until he found the right dose to trigger mild flu. He hopes eventually to test the harsher H3N2 strain, too.
    Now he's infecting two groups - people with low antibody levels and those with high levels. Some were recently vaccinated, and some weren't. He'll compare how sick they get, how long they're contagious and how the immune system jumps into action.
    Called a human challenge study, this kind of research hasn't been performed with flu viruses in the U.S. for more than a decade, before scientists had ways as sophisticated to measure what happens.

    "It's all going to add up to a better understanding of what you need to have to be protected against the flu," said Dr. John Treanor, a flu specialist at the University of Rochester Medical Center who is closely watching the work.
    So far, Memoli's patients are becoming contagious a day or two before they start feeling bad, one reason the flu spreads so easily. He sees a range of symptoms, from sniffles to a few days of moderate fever, fatigue and congestion.
    Bennett's flu was pretty mild, and he passed the time studying, watching TV and playing games with the four other study participants infected this month.
    "All I had to do was read and watch movies, so it wasn't that terrible," Bennett said. "It was a really cool experience" to see how research is done.
    "I never saw a wild thing sorry for itself. A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough without ever having felt sorry for itself." -DH Lawrence
    "We do not see things as they are, we see things as we are." - The Talmud

  2. #2
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    No thank you. This from the same Government that gave people Syphilis?
    "America is at that awkward stage, to late to work within the system, but to early to shoot the bastards"-- Claire Wolfe

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2001
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    middle of tornado alley
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    15 just get the flu shot, it will the same thing it seems,

    everyone Im around who got their flu shot have been sick many times this yr, those who stayed away, got sniffles ect, but no full blown sickness like the others,

  4. #4
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    U.P. Michigan
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    Not only no, but HELL no!
    What is the lake of fire? What is it's purpose? Is the lake of fire eternal hell? Is there any hope of escape for those cast into this lake?
    http://bible-truths.com/lake1.html

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Hognutz View Post
    No thank you. This from the same Government that gave people Syphilis?
    Yep, can't be sure if your really getting the flu or something more potentially dangerous and 'exotic'.

    So I'd have to say, "Hell To The No!".

    However with my work schedule, being able to lay around in my pajamas all day even with a high fever would be considered a vacation to me. *sigh* V

  6. #6
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    Gee, to lay in bed, feel like crap, and get paid, or go to work, get treated like crap, and get paid...this could be a toss-up...
    A socialist will trample over one hundred poor people just for the chance to throw a rock at a rich man.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Countrybumpkin View Post
    Gee, to lay in bed, feel like crap, and get paid, or go to work, get treated like crap, and get paid...this could be a toss-up...

    Yea, I know how y'all feel!
    "America is at that awkward stage, to late to work within the system, but to early to shoot the bastards"-- Claire Wolfe

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
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    A Multi-Demensional Quantum Environment.
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    For some reason I had a movie scene come to mind of just such a enclosure, something named 'Captain Tripps' and the Walking Man is coming...

    I don't need a Catch-phrase. I'm Satanta. A Catch-phrase needs me.

    "It ain't no secret I didn't get these scars falling over in church."



    http://chronart.wix.com/chronart

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hfcomms View Post
    Not only no, but HELL no!
    No kidding. Who in their right mind would sign up for this? Good grief.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2001
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    Ontario, Canada
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    Wow. A rare statement of truth"

    "Vaccines are working, but we could do better," said Dr. Matthew Memoli of the National Institutes of Health, who is leading the study that aims to infect up to 100 adults over the next year.

    Vaccines DO cause the flu. Yep. But not enough. "We could do better!"

    So now we're smart to not just NOT get the flu vaccine. Now we have to NOT sneeze for cash.
    The country has been conquered and is under occupation. That's a fact. Before you dispute it, gather your facts. Got any?
    "No one in this world, so far as I know, and I have searched the record for years, and employed agents to help me - has ever lost money by underestimating the intelligence of the great masses of the plain people." H.L. Mencken

  11. #11
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    It would be interesting to see how they justified this study from an ethics standpoint. I know they obtained informed consent from participants, but still......knowingly innoculating someone with the flu virus (and then offering $3k to do it) to observe its effects seems to violate at least a few ethical principles (ie. nonmaleficence). Do the benefits of the study truly outweigh the risks? It would also be interesting to see the demographics of the study population.....will the $3k entice lower income people to participate, and is that taking unfair advantage? (Yes, I know, they have to willingly consent - and no one is holding a gun to their heads). Just some thoughts....
    "Therefore I tell you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat or drink; or about your body, what you will wear. Is not life more important than food, and the body more important than clothes? Look at the birds of the air; they do not sow or reap or store away in barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not much more valuable than they?" (Matthew 6:25-26)

  12. #12
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    better flu vaccines
    Former KGB Agent Yuri Bezmenov Explains Our Four Stages – “The New Normal”… http://theconservativetreehouse.com/...-new-normal-2/

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by WriterMom View Post
    It would be interesting to see how they justified this study from an ethics standpoint. I know they obtained informed consent from participants, but still......knowingly innoculating someone with the flu virus (and then offering $3k to do it) to observe its effects seems to violate at least a few ethical principles (ie. nonmaleficence). Do the benefits of the study truly outweigh the risks? It would also be interesting to see the demographics of the study population.....will the $3k entice lower income people to participate, and is that taking unfair advantage? (Yes, I know, they have to willingly consent - and no one is holding a gun to their heads). Just some thoughts....
    "...from an ethics standpoint..." ?

    Now that's funny.
    The country has been conquered and is under occupation. That's a fact. Before you dispute it, gather your facts. Got any?
    "No one in this world, so far as I know, and I have searched the record for years, and employed agents to help me - has ever lost money by underestimating the intelligence of the great masses of the plain people." H.L. Mencken

  14. #14

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Betty_Rose View Post
    No kidding. Who in their right mind would sign up for this? Good grief.
    Gives the term 'gibsmedats' a whole new meaning!
    B.O.H.I.C.A.

  16. #16
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    Modest proposal - if turnabout is considered fair play -

    how much must we pay to give the govt. the flu?


    jmho - in jest, of course

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Betty_Rose View Post
    No kidding. Who in their right mind would sign up for this? Good grief.

    I'm in!!! Never said I was in my right mind.
    .
    "The karma café has no menu......You get served what you deserve!"

    ".Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in, broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, WOW, What a ride!"

    Personal Responsibility..The one thing no one can take away from you

    ."The only tyrant I accept in this world is the still, small voice within me."

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Countrybumpkin View Post
    Gee, to lay in bed, feel like crap, and get paid, or go to work, get treated like crap, and get paid...this could be a toss-up...
    Only if it's tax free

  19. #19
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    Sep 2004
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    The 5 Scariest Things About Life as a Human Test Subject

    Now for the downside


    http://www.cracked.com/article_19809...ubject_p2.html
    The 5 Scariest Things About Life as a Human Test Subject
    Mary Johnson May 14, 2012



    Human medical test subject is in that category of jobs, along with sperm donor and medicinal pot grower, that kind of seem like free money. Sure, you can't get rich doing it, but it's there if you should ever need it. Take some pills, fill out some forms, maybe accidentally gain X-ray vision or something.
    But, as with all things, this job is a way bigger deal than you thought. For instance ...
    #5. Get in Line, Because Everybody Wants to Do It


    So you see an ad in the paper offering to pay a couple of hundred bucks to let yourself be injected with some experimental drug. You'd have to assume there isn't exactly going to be a line around the block to get in. This stuff is for the desperate and almost homeless, right?
    Getty

    "Just one more shot, sir, and you can get back to sleeping in storm drains."
    Nope. Getting into a clinical trial can be just as hard as getting a real job, partly because you are going up against people who actually do clinical trials as their real job. In the business, they're called guinea piggers (except at Christmas dinner, when they presumably say they're waiters or something), and their numbers are in the thousands. This means that more often than not, applying for a trial forces you to compete against a gaggle of people whose resumes list their special skills as "metabolizing drugs and disregarding personal health for money."
    These are the sort of folks who travel around the country doing the clinical trial circuit, calmly signing up for all kinds of research -- including tests that require them to spend weeks in a lab. They also follow a strict dietary regimen and abstain from alcohol and any drugs that could create a reaction with whatever mystery chemical they're ingesting next. Though even then, these uber-subjects might not qualify for reasons as obscure as, say, being the wrong size.
    Getty

    "Sadly, our shrinking potion has rendered you ineligible to test the antidote."
    That's the other thing. To qualify for a certain study, you have to fit within the standards that they set for age and weight. Many require you to be a non-smoker, and alcohol is naturally a major no-no. Most studies also force you to abstain from over-the-counter drugs such as Tylenol for up to 30 days before the study even begins. Basically, to sign up for a study, you have to hope that they have one with parameters you fit into, and that it's not already full of pros. And that's kind of amazing, considering ...
    #4. If Their Drug Poisons You, You're on Your Own

    Let's say you make your way through the hordes of guinea piggers and actually manage to sign up as a test subject proper. You have filled out all the paperwork, sat through half a dozen interviews with various doctors and administrators and are on your way to earning that quick buck, drug testin' style. They inject you with their experimental substance. Then you wake from a weeklong coma, only to find out you now sport an exciting new disease that causes green dicks to sprout from the sides of your neck.

    Or something far worse.
    After you've stopped screaming, you realize you're going to be facing some pretty impressive medical bills and have no way of covering them, especially as your brand new Viridis dongneckium probably doesn't play well with your day job as a dental hygienist. Luckily, you can rely on the testing company to cover for their mistakes and pay your medical bills.
    Getty

    Saying that out loud guarantees you a dose of the "best medicine."
    Ha, of course not! Hope you like turtlenecks, because there's almost no way you're getting a dime from them. Although the vast majority of human guinea pigs walk away more or less unharmed, sometimes things just go wrong. And you were informed of that when you signed the papers. Unfortunately, although both the government and the medical community have given countless recommendations, there are no laws whatsoever forcing the companies to provide compensation or medical care for their more ... unfortunate human guinea pigs.
    So we find ourselves in a situation where the representatives of the testing facility are forced to look deep within their hearts and decide whether they want to help a person whose life they've effectively ruined. This goes about as well as you'd expect: A whopping 84 percent of medical centers tell the injured subject to piss off empty-handed, and the rest are willing to pay for medical care only. None are willing to compensate one red cent for lost wages or pain.
    Getty

    "Sorry, but it's not in our policy to give a damn. Enjoy your remaining toes!"
    But you still have the government to protect you, right?
    #3. The Government Won't Protect You

    Nope! Although the government does take a keen and intimate interest in the overall process of drug approval trials, they're not very inclined to give a shit about what happens to some of the smaller cogs in the machinery. Namely, you. Only a fraction of clinical trials actually end up in any federal government files. It's not entirely their fault -- there are countless tests taking place at any given moment. It's damn near impossible to keep track of them all, even if they're appropriately handled.
    Getty

    "At this point, we're just throwing stuff into syringes and seeing what happens."
    What's more, the vast majority of commercial drug testing is in the hands of privately owned testing companies. They operate like any business; they make their research centers cozy and nice to keep their "customers" comfortable, but the courtesy often ends the moment the customer has an expensive problem. Because, like any business, they're ultimately in it for the money. When test subjects start changing color after sampling their new wonder drug, the companies can occasionally be tempted to cut corners when it comes to petty stuff like, say, reporting the incident.
    Oversight of the system is largely left to the doctors who oversee the experiments, but the problem is if something bad happens, those same doctors are the ones responsible. Researchers have been known to abuse the shit out of the situation. "Safety protocol failures" happen, paperwork is left deliberately vague and violations are hand-waved away. As a direct result of these practices, nearly 5,000 test subjects suffer side effects or downright injuries that the doctors do not bother to report. Each year.
    Getty

    "Uh, she already looked like that."
    But at least you risked your non-deformed hide in the name of scientific advancement. Whatever they tested on you will surely wind up helping some unlucky soul down the line. You're helping to save lives here! Well, the only thing is


    #2. Most Testing Is Futile

    While some variation of what you're about to ingest might at some point make it to the drugstore shelf, chances are that you have just signed up for yet another medical pissing-in-the-wind project. Drug testing involves a whole lot of trial and error. Only one in 10,000 drugs makes it from early concept stage to legal status as medicine. Of the ones that make it to human clinical trial stage -- by which time most of the glitches should've been weeded out -- a staggering 80 percent never gain the FDA stamp of approval. In other words, four chances in five say your participation means precisely jack squat in the grand scheme of things.
    Getty

    "Turns out infecting people with syphilis doesn't control head lice."
    What's more, drug trials on humans are wildly inaccurate. Clinical trials typically use a three-stage system that involves up to a few thousand willing participants. However, adverse reactions may only show up when the drug is taken by millions of people -- too many to get into a trial. In other words, they won't find out until the drug is already in distribution.
    So even if your particular prototype drug happened to be among the precious 20 percent that eventually hit the shelves, there's no telling what it will do in the long term. Maybe it turns out to be the next Viagra, or maybe it proves to be another thalidomide. It happens all the time -- hell, Valium was on the market for 20 years before someone figured out that it's addictive.
    Getty

    "A drug that lets people forget all of their problems? It'll never catch on."
    But let's face it, at the end of the day, you're doing this for the money. So, about that ...
    #1. The Money Sucks

    Look, risk or no risk, the point is that drug testing is a lot of money for not much time or effort. It's the risk that you're getting paid for, so if you don't wind up with neck dongs, then you've beaten the system. Right?

    Oh, quit whining. They can probably just lance it.
    Well, a $500 check for popping some pills for a couple of days sounds like good money ... that is, before you factor in exactly how much of your time the study is going to take. A good chunk of better-paying clinical trials involve staying in -- or at least visiting -- the lab for several days, for blood sampling and monitoring of the effects. So after you get that $500 check, more often than not you realize you're in minimum wage territory.
    Take this seemingly sweet-ass deal:
    Holy shit, $1,900 for a four-weekend thing! Who wouldn't want to take part in this, even knowing the risks? That's great money, even after you notice that the "four-weekend study" spreads those four weekends over nearly three months.
    Or is it? If you get out a pad of paper and add up all of the hours they've asked for up there, you'll get 220 hours across the three months. Factor in, say, five hours for return-visit commuting, and you'll get a grand total of $8.44 per hour. That's a McJob wage right there, and at least they don't require you to inject the secret sauce and see what happens.
    Getty

    And if something horrible happens, you might get workman's comp.
    One study found that the average hourly wage of guinea pigs was actually slightly more than that: some $9.50 per hour. Sure, it's more than minimum wage, but we can't help but feel that your health and safety are worth at least $10.
    Don't get us wrong; human guinea pigs are needed, and most of the tests are pretty routine fare. Just don't be so surprised when you find yourself scratching that suspicious itch as you fill in your hard-earned petty cash in its very own "human experiment subject" tax form.


    Read more: http://www.cracked.com/article_19809...#ixzz2rZXXjUC4
    "I never saw a wild thing sorry for itself. A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough without ever having felt sorry for itself." -DH Lawrence
    "We do not see things as they are, we see things as we are." - The Talmud

  20. #20
    Join Date
    May 2001
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    Atlanta, GA
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    $3000.

    Hmmm.

    Well, we DO need a new roof....

    If only I wasn't too old....
    The only "change" I CAN believe in: I Corinthians 15: 51-52!

  21. #21
    Gee if I did it here in The Land Of Oz I'd be lucky to get half of the money after Dear Government took its slice of the pie. If I had to run back and forth for an hourly rate of $10 I'd end up with nothing.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    May 2004
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    Why does the date 1918 keep popping up in my head???
    Ephesians 5:11 - " Take no part in the unfruitful works of darkness, but instead expose them. ”

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