Check out the TB2K CHATROOM, open 24/7               Configuring Your Preferences for OPTIMAL Viewing
  To access our Email server, CLICK HERE

  If you are unfamiliar with the Guidelines for Posting on TB2K please read them.      ** LINKS PAGE **



*** Help Support TB2K ***
via mail, at TB2K Fund, P.O. Box 71, Coupland, TX, 78615
or


GOV/MIL 51 Sailors from USS Ronald Reagan Suffering Thyroid Cancer.....
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 40 of 48
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Somewhere in the Sierra's, Ca.
    Posts
    1,692

    51 Sailors from USS Ronald Reagan Suffering Thyroid Cancer.....

    From veteran friend who served on a Carrier during Vietnam....



    51 Sailors from USS Ronald Reagan Suffering Thyroid Cancer, Leukemia, Brain Tumors After Participating in Fukushima Nuclear Rescue Efforts




    December 12, 2013 -- (TRN http://www.TurnerRadioNetwork.com ) -- Crew members in their mid-20's from the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan are coming down with all sorts of radiation-related illnesses after being deployed less than 3 years ago to assist with earthquake rescue operations off the coast of Japan in 2011. It looks as though the onboard desalinization systems that take salt out of seawater to make it drinkable, were taking-in radioactive water from the ocean for the crew to drink, cook with and bath-in, before anyone realized there was a massive radiation spill into the ocean.

    Charles Bonner, attorney representing sailors from the USS Ronald Reagan said "the crew members were not only going to the rescue by jumping into the water and rescuing people out of the water, but they were drinking desalinated sea water, bathing in it, until finally the captain of the USS Ronald Reagan alarmed people that they were encountering high levels of radiation."

    Bonner says that as a result of this exposure, the 51 sailors have come down with a host of medical problems, "They have testicular cancer, they have thyroid cancers, they have leukemias, they have rectal and gynecological bleeding, a host of problems that they did not have before ... people are going blind, pilots who had perfect eyesight but now have tumors on the brain. And it’s only been 3 years since they went in." Bonner pointed out that these service men and women are young people, ages 21, 22, 23 years old and no one in their family had ever suffered any of these kinds of illnesses before.


    At present, 51 sailors from the USS Ronald Reagan are named as Plaintiffs in a lawsuit against the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) and Bonner says he anticipates adding twenty additional Sailors soon, bringing the total to 70 to 75 because "The Japanese government is in a major conspiracy with TEPCO to hide and conceal the true facts."

    UPDATE: DECEMBER 14, 2013 2:18 PM EST -- In an utterly shocking admission at a meeting of the Japan Press Club on December 12, 2013, the former Prime Minister of Japan, Naoto Kan, who was in-office when the Fukushima disaster took place, told assembled journalists "[People think it was March 12th but] the first meltdown occurred 5 hours after the earthquake." This means that the government of Japan KNEW there was horrific radiation being released, but did not tell the U.S. Navy which had deployed the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan to assist with rescue efforts. Our story covering this new aspect of the Fukushima incident is available HERE
    Lies, lies and more lies, the truth is so hard to find...!!!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Bugville
    Posts
    5,393
    I just saw this and was getting ready to post it. Glad you did.
    The thing about common sense is, it is not so common any more
    Sic Semper Tyrannis

    "SO......What's going on in the Land of WTF Just Happened?" ~ Mr. BurtonLake

  3. #3
    It appears they were literally 'marinated' in radioactivity. V

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    2,172
    Wow...

  5. #5
    Same thing happened in Viet Nam with agent orange. I really couldn't believe they would have not sampled the intakes for radiation since they know beyond a doubt this happens. The bigger problem is all the water is then stored in the ships fresh water tanks and used as needed. The radiation can contaminate the tanks and be passed on to a new crew that was not even near Fuk. The dioxin in agent orange never left the fresh water tanks and accumulated and was passed on to new crews. Vessie you are right on when you say they where marinated in radioactivity. The amount increases with the desalination process and storage. In our situation in Viet Nam we where exposed to five times the amount of agent orange than if we were just directly sprayed. Commanding officer of the Ronald Reagan needs his or her nuts tacked to the bulkhead.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    955
    Cannon fodder. A different type, mind you, but fodder for sure.

    Sad
    The country has been conquered and is under occupation. That's a fact. Before you dispute it, gather your facts. Got any?
    "No one in this world, so far as I know, and I have searched the record for years, and employed agents to help me - has ever lost money by underestimating the intelligence of the great masses of the plain people." H.L. Mencken

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Smallville
    Posts
    8,658
    Is this the same Hal Turner that says the Holocaust never happened and was an informant for the FBI?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Purdy area, Western WA
    Posts
    22,258
    The crew NOW may be much fewer, but the crew THEN WAS ALMOST 6,000 men and women, ALL EXPOSED TO RADIATION by DRINKING IT! The "casualty numbers" ARE JUST BEGINNING TO COME IN. They may ALL eventually be found to be cancer victims.

    http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/76.htm

    USS RONALD REAGAN (CVN-76)

    Specifications
    Class: NIMITZ

    As built: Displacement: 77,600+ tons (98,235+ fl) — Dimensions: 1,040' wl (1,092' oa) x 134' (252' fd) x 37' / 317 wl (332.8 oa) x 40.8 (76.8 fd) x 11.3 meters — Armor: unknown — Power plant: 2 A4W nuclear reactors, 4 steam turbines, 4 screws; 260,000+ shp (*) — Speed: 30+ knots — Endurance: 1.5 million nm @ 20 knots (*) — Armament: Two Mk.29 8-cell NATO Sea Sparrow launchers; two 21-cell RAM launchers — Radar: SPS-48E 3D air search; SPS-49A(V)1 2D air search; SPS-67(V) surface search; Mk.23 target acquisition; SPN-43B and 2 SPN-46 air traffic control; SPN-44A landing aid — Fire control: 3 Mk.91 NSSM systems with Mk.95 radars — EW: SLQ-32(V)4 active jamming/deception; WLR-1H ESM; Mk.36 SRBOC decoy; SLQ-25A Nixie decoy — Aircraft: 80+ — Aviation facilities: 4 elevators; 4 steam catapults — Crew: 5,700-5,900

    (*): Unofficial figures (propulsion information for nuclear powered ships is not released by the US Navy)

    Operational and Building Data
    Poison Ivy is still Poison Ivy even if you transplant it into a rose garden and call it a rose.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Maine... 100 miles inland in mountains
    Posts
    2,802
    if report is true, this is unusual in that the onset of cancer is really so soon after exposure. what would be the incidence more years out?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Purdy area, Western WA
    Posts
    22,258
    What is the "BACK UP PLAN FOR POTABLE WATER" on those carriers if the water your carrier is fighting, sailing, or passing through IS RADIOACTIVE?
    You CANNOT just rely on desalinization if the water is radioactive. How is this or any other ship capable of fighting a nuclear war?
    Poison Ivy is still Poison Ivy even if you transplant it into a rose garden and call it a rose.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    East Tennessee
    Posts
    9,511
    Quote Originally Posted by ainitfunny View Post
    What is the "BACK UP PLAN FOR POTABLE WATER" on those carriers if the water your carrier is fighting, sailing, or passing through IS RADIOACTIVE?
    You CANNOT just rely on desalinization if the water is radioactive. How is this or any other ship capable of fighting a nuclear war?
    EXACTLY!!!!!

    WTF Is going on here???!!!! How was this NOT detected?
    "You don't change the way people think by changing what they say. You change the way people think with HEADLESS CHARRED BODIES FLYING THROUGH THE AIR. BLOOD! FLAMES! HELLFIRE AND DAMNATION!"
    ~~ Alastair J. R. Young

    "Bring me tools and beer!!!" ~~ Homer Simpson

    "If a dream is all that I got, then I wish you in a fairy tale where you are still in love with me." ~~ Cold

    "All weather is now manufactured. Period."
    ~~Scott Stevens

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Western NC
    Posts
    1,358
    But will the VA allow them to be treated at the hospitals. Or do like they did with agent orange, deny it for 20+ years

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by ainitfunny View Post
    What is the "BACK UP PLAN FOR POTABLE WATER" on those carriers if the water your carrier is fighting, sailing, or passing through IS RADIOACTIVE?
    You CANNOT just rely on desalinization if the water is radioactive. How is this or any other ship capable of fighting a nuclear war?
    I am not familiar with todays Navy but there was no back up plan for us when the Evaps went down. That is what they are called. You ration fresh water for only cooking and drinking. It gets a little rank below decks in 120 degree heat. Showers are salt water which in this case and ours was contaminated. The only other course of action would be to pull a tanker of fresh water along side and pump a load aboard. Sometimes we had made extra while in a bay or river mouth and would pull into the PBR or Swift boat docks and down load our extra water for the special ops there. Nice of us to share the experience.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeep View Post
    But will the VA allow them to be treated at the hospitals. Or do like they did with agent orange, deny it for 20+ years
    Good question Jeep.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    U.P. Michigan
    Posts
    16,870
    Quote Originally Posted by colonel holman View Post
    if report is true, this is unusual in that the onset of cancer is really so soon after exposure. what would be the incidence more years out?
    I highly doubt the veracity of the story. This one entity reporting it is suspect and the others reporting it reference this story. It is simply much to early post exposure to develop thyroid cancer. 10 years from now I could buy but not a few years post exposure. This needs to be verified by other sources. If accurate, it couldn't be suppressed.
    What is the lake of fire? What is it's purpose? Is the lake of fire eternal hell? Is there any hope of escape for those cast into this lake?
    http://bible-truths.com/lake1.html

  16. #16
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    15,133
    " If accurate, it couldn't be suppressed. "

    Famous last words---on any NUMBER of government (our's OR Japan's or any other's) cover-ups.....
    The only "change" I CAN believe in: I Corinthians 15: 51-52!

  17. #17
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Cow Hampshire
    Posts
    11,253
    http://www.stripes.com/in-growing-la...esses-1.230512

    By Matthew M. Burke Stars and Stripes

    Published: July 15, 2013
    Lawsuit expands over radiation exposure during Fukushima disaster

    US sailors sue Japanese utility over radiation exposure

    Mike Sebourn — seen here in a Tyvek suit during operation Tomodachi — is one of 50 sick sailors and Marines who are suing the Japanese utility TEPCO for allegedly lying to the U.S. military about the dangers they faced, thus lulling them into complacency as radiation spewed from the damaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant shortly after the earthquake and tsunami in 2011.

    SASEBO NAVAL BASE, Japan — Five months after participating in humanitarian operations for the March 11, 2011, earthquake and tsunami that led to nuclear disaster in Japan, Petty Officer 3rd Class Daniel Hair’s body began to betray him.

    He had sharp hip pains, constant scabbing in his nose, back pain, memory loss, severe anxiety and a constant high-pitch ringing in his ears as his immune system began to attack his body. The diagnosis, he said, was a genetic immune system disease, which on X-rays looked to have made his hip joint jagged and his spine arthritic. He was put on a host of medications and eventually separated from the Navy job he loved.

    Hair believes radiation is the cause. He is among 50 sailors and Marines in a growing lawsuit against Tokyo Electric Power Co., alleging that Japan’s nationalized utility mishandled the meltdown at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant that spewed radiation into the air and water.

    Other servicemembers have been diagnosed with leukemia, testicular cancer and thyroid problems or experienced rectal and gynecological bleeding, the lawsuit says. Hair said one of his friends, a fellow USS Ronald Reagan shipmate, was diagnosed with a brain tumor.

    “I live in pain every day,” Hair said. “I went from this guy in top physical condition to a deteriorating body and a whacked-out mindset.”

    Hair said there is no history of the genetic disease in his family and that doctors have told him radiation exposure could have triggered it.

    The Defense Department and other organizations have said the radiation levels that troops were exposed to during Operation Tomodachi were safe, implying that any cancers or physical ailments since then are coincidental. Nearly half of all men and one-third of all women in the U.S. will develop cancer during their lifetimes, according to the American Cancer Society.

    “The U.S. Navy took proactive measures throughout and following the disaster relief efforts to control, reduce and mitigate the levels of Fukushima-related contamination on U.S. Navy ships and aircraft,” Pacific Fleet spokesman Lt. Anthony Falvo wrote in a statement to Stars and Stripes.

    “To provide a radiological dose perspective, when USS Ronald Reagan sailed through a plume of radioactivity from the Fukushima nuclear power plant during disaster relief operations, the maximum potential radiation dose received by any ship’s force personnel ... was less than the radiation exposure received from about one month of exposure to natural background radiation from sources such as rocks, soil, and the sun.”

    Independent reports back up the Defense Department’s statement, but the suit continues to grow. An additional 150 servicemembers are being screened to join, plaintiffs’ lawyer Paul Garner said last month. Each servicemember participating will have to prove in court that his or her conditions are related to the exposure, something Garner says he is confident they can do.

    The plaintiffs allege that TEPCO lied about the risk of exposure, luring American forces closer to the affected areas and lulling others at bases across Japan to disregard safety measures. They are seeking at least $40 million each in compensatory and punitive damages and more than $1 billion for a fund to cover health monitoring and medical expenses.

    They will be in federal court in San Diego on Oct. 3 to fight a TEPCO motion for a change of venue to Tokyo and a motion to dismiss, Garner said.

    Most of the plaintiffs contacted by Stars and Stripes did not return messages. Several said they were being threatened and harassed through anonymous phone calls and social media for bringing the suit and declined to comment. The plaintiffs have been accused of being fortune-seekers by their peers and for allegedly sullying the operation’s goodwill.

    The sailors who spoke out see it differently. Hair, who lost his Navy career as a result of his medical status, said he wanted to see some humility and compassion from TEPCO, which declined to comment on the suit.

    “Yeah, there is money involved, but how else is that company going to pay for what they’ve done to people?” Hair said. “Who knows what health problems we’ll have down the road?”

    Into the fray

    When the earthquake struck, Hair and his Reagan shipmates were en route to Korea. They immediately turned around and steamed to the affected area.

    “There were people in distress,” he said. “This is what we signed up for.”

    The Reagan passed through debris as far as the eye could see: wood, refrigerators, car tires, roofs of houses with people riding on them. Hair was told they were five to 10 miles off the coast from Fukushima, which had been damaged by a massive tsunami spawned by the quake.

    Sailors were drinking desalinated seawater and bathing in it until the ship’s leadership came over the public address system and told them to stop because it was contaminated, Hair said. They were told the ventilation system was contaminated, and he claims he was pressured into signing a form that said he had been given an iodine pill even though none had been provided. As a low-ranking sailor, he believed he had no choice.

    The Navy has acknowledged that the Reagan passed through a plume of radiation but declined to comment on the details in Hair’s story.

    And while many of the plaintiffs came from the Reagan, some of the sailors and Marines involved in the suit were much farther away — adding to skepticism about the motives behind the suit and reigniting a decades-long debate over the effects of low-level radiation.

    Shortly after the disaster, Senior Chief Mike Sebourn was sent from his home base, Naval Air Facility Atsugi, to Misawa Air Base, 200 miles from the faltering power plant. As a designated radiation decontamination officer, he dealt with aircraft and personnel that had flown into the area.

    Sebourn, with only two days of training, was tasked with testing seven points on an aircraft’s skin for radiation. He and others crawled all over the crafts for months, he said, with only gloves for protection. At one point, he said, they took the radiator out of one aircraft and tested it. The radiation was four times greater than what should have required them to wear a suit and respirator, he said.

    The level of radiation “was incredibly dangerous,” Sebourn said. “Navy aviation had never dealt with radiation before. Nobody knew what to do. Nobody knew what was safe. It was a nightmare.”

    Sebourn said he suffered nose bleeds, headaches and nausea in the immediate aftermath — symptoms consistent with radiation poisoning. Months later, he felt weak in his right arm; excruciating pain followed. He said the command fitness leader in charge of physical training at Atsugi watched as his arm atrophied to about half its size.

    “I have issues that can’t be explained,” Sebourn said. “It just seems like I am deteriorating.”

    Sebourn said he went to doctors more than a dozen times, but no one knew what had caused the former personal trainer to lose 70 percent of the strength in the right side of his body. He retired after 17 years in Japan.

    Sebourn is alarmed that the word “radiation” doesn’t appear anywhere in his service record, even though that was his job and he was exposed to it. He believed troops exposed would be red-flagged in their service records and be tracked for medical problems.

    The Defense Department created the Operation Tomodachi Registry to show radiation dose estimates based on shore locations — and to list more than 70,000 DOD-affiliated people in the area March 12-May 11, 2011 and their individual exposure levels. More than two years after the disaster, the registry remains incomplete.

    They hope to release the data for ship-based personnel this month, Craig Postlewaite, director for Defense Department Force Readiness and Health Assurance, wrote in a statement to Stars and Stripes.

    Limited information

    The scientific community is divided on the effects of low-level radiation.

    A World Health Organization report released earlier this year said those located outside the most affected areas have little increased risk for cancers or thyroid problems and those within the areas have only a slight increase of risk. However, the report states that the assessment could change over time, because not enough is known about low-level radiation.

    “Because scientific understanding of radiation effects, particularly at low doses, may increase in the future, it is possible that further investigation may change our understanding of the risks of this radiation accident,” the report said.

    Shinzo Kimura, a professor at Dokkyo Medical University in Japan, had been collecting radiation contamination data and studying the radiation exposure risks from Chernobyl. He was the first scientist on the ground in Fukushima after the disaster, and he said he was compelled to take readings because he didn’t trust Japan’s government.

    “My heart breaks greatly that those servicemembers, who worked for Japan during Operation Tomodachi, suffered radiation exposure,” he said.

    Even though some say low-level radiation exposure is harmless, Kimura said some studies have suggested that low-dosage radiation exposure could increase the risk of cancers. However, the risk depends on the amount of radiation that person was exposed to, and with little accurate data, he believes the servicemembers’ case may be hard to prove.

    Kimura said the levels were so high around the plant that his dosimeter was unable to measure the radiation — the level was off his device’s scale.

    He said the winds were blowing out toward ships off the coast in the days after the disaster.

    In addition to Kimura’s claims, a Japanese government study released in February found that more than 25 times as many people in the area have developed thyroid cancer compared with data from before the disaster.

    Kimura said the effects of ingesting radiation-contaminated water aren’t known.

    “There are many things that are unknown about how internal exposure effects human body,” Kimura said. “So, the effects [it could have] can’t be completely denied.”

    The U.S. military has refused requests from Stars and Stripes for detailed information about the types of toxins and the levels that personnel were exposed to during Operation Tomodachi. U.S. Forces Japan has said samples collected from areas where troops deployed near Sendai were analyzed for hundreds of environmental contaminants, but they have not released information about how many samples were taken in the disaster zone or how many sites were surveyed.

    Toxic chemicals, such as asbestos, were cited as a concern by health organizations during the clean-up effort. In April 2011, The Associated Press reported that activists found asbestos — a cancer-causing, fibrous material — in the air and in debris from the devastated northeastern coast. At that time, Japan’s Health Ministry said it was issuing pamphlets outlining safety guidelines and distributing 90,000 masks in the hardest-hit prefectures in an effort to reduce the risks, the AP reported.

    Other cases set precedent

    There is precedent in Japan for making TEPCO pay damages. In May, the Nuclear Damage Claim Dispute Resolution Center, a government-run alternative dispute resolution entity, presented an initial compromise offer — siding with about 180 residents of Ilidate village, in Fukushima prefecture’s Nagadoro district — that TEPCO pay about $5,000 to each person and $10,000 for each pregnant woman and child for mental distress from radiation exposure, said the residents’ lawyer, Yosuke Yamamoto. They have also demanded compensation for household goods and utilities.

    The center suggested anyone in the area for at least two days after March 15 should be compensated, Yamamoto said. There is no timeline for a final ruling. The center will hear individual cases on both sides and make a final proposal.

    The servicemember plaintiffs say they don’t blame the U.S. military for what has happened to them. They believe it acted in good faith and did the best it could with the information it was given at the time. However, they are happy to take on TEPCO — and to face the ire that has come to so many.

    “I wish they could see what they’ve cost me by not making us aware of what we were getting into,” Hair said. “I could be dying at 40 years old.”

    Stars and Stripes reporters Hana Kusumoto and Seth Robson contributed to this report.
    Like others, one might question the short time since exposure. Also with 5000 seamen (seapeople?) a certain percentage will develop cancers through natural attrition - but 50? (1-100 incidence)

    It is possible we have here shyster lawyers attempting to garner victims. After every major public incident there is a hue and cry of victimization - and the lawyers are quick to assist where possible to sort it out (think $ not empathy here.)

    And I will not rule out true exposure. Lets face it, nuclear carriers protect the crew from exposure from within - not from without. The armed forces contained within are considered expendible to external forces of all kinds, including radiological.

    And not an apologist for the nuclear industry. Fuke IS a disaster, no matter how you look at it. And disaster, natural or otherwise, hurts humans.

    Dobbin
    I hinnire propter hoc ecce ego

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Smallville
    Posts
    8,658
    Quote Originally Posted by ainitfunny View Post
    What is the "BACK UP PLAN FOR POTABLE WATER" on those carriers if the water your carrier is fighting, sailing, or passing through IS RADIOACTIVE?
    You CANNOT just rely on desalinization if the water is radioactive. How is this or any other ship capable of fighting a nuclear war?
    Are you sure the water was radioactive, or particles IN the water were radioactive? Desalinization by evaporation, also known as distilling, should produce water free of radioactive particles.

  19. #19
    If this is true and Stars and Stripes is hardly an "alternative" paper - then every single one of those 6,000 brave sailors should not be in a law suit, congress should pass an emergency (probably private members bills with a hundred co-sponsers) called something like the Hero's Medical Care and Pensions Act (or something like that) that would absolutely assure life time medical coverage (in full) for any medical condition linked by (x number) of doctors to radiation or earthquake rescue related conditions along with a life time pension for all personnel involved either when they are medically forced to retire or at normal retirement age if they are lucky enough to reach it - this should be tax-free (all of it) in recognition of the bravely shown and in thanks for their self less service when rescuing people from contaminated water and continuing to serve in such horrific conditions.

    I realize that all serving military know they can face this sort of thing and most don't get anything "extra" but this situation is so far beyond the usual, especially considering that it is very likely that a simple radiation test would have shown how bad the situation was within hours - I remember at the time there were calls to move all US military personnel out of Japan ASAP and yet while some removals were planned, very few actually took place.

    The military is responsible for making that decision (who knows, in terms of saving civilian lives it might have seen like the best choice at the time) but now the military has to live with that decision and that should include supporting service members who come down with radiation related conditions with few questions asked, as opposed to putting each individual through heck and then forcing a law suit to get anything sorted.

    Agent Orange was bad enough, so was the exposure of troops to nuclear tests in the 1950s although at least back then it can be argued that science didn't know as much about exposure as it does now but these days there is no such excuse.

    I am all in favor of saving tax payer money but this is so not the way to do it - again, especially with an all volunteer military - treat people like this and even fewer will serve; to have young people so badly injured and ill is terrible to force them to go to court to get their government to accept the tab for decisions they made is even worse.

    If this turns out to be real, I hope it is settled very soon, if I ever saw something that should get a bipartisan response in congress, this would be it.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Maine... 100 miles inland in mountains
    Posts
    2,802
    it takes at least several yrs for a cancer to develop, then grow to a symptomatic level, then some time for a cluster pattern to become noticed.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    955
    Quote Originally Posted by DHR43 View Post
    Cannon fodder. A different type, mind you, but fodder for sure.

    Sad
    It really shouldn't be too hard to understand why this tragedy happened.

    The brass don't care. Neither do their bosses. Neither do the people, either.
    The country has been conquered and is under occupation. That's a fact. Before you dispute it, gather your facts. Got any?
    "No one in this world, so far as I know, and I have searched the record for years, and employed agents to help me - has ever lost money by underestimating the intelligence of the great masses of the plain people." H.L. Mencken

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    12,436
    Yes there was some contamination of the ship's surface and some of the crewmembers doing helo and small boat rescue and survey received some doses of radiation.
    Most of which fell within the acceptable dose limits for rad workers. All nuclear ships have extensive and continuous radiation monitoring. Also all crew members working around the reactor continuously wear radiation monitors which are read frequently. It is almost a sure thing that all those involved in rescue and survey operations also wore radiation monitors.
    When I was a rad worker in the Navy we wore TLDs on our belts and additional monitoring equipment when working on or near the reactor. Don't know what they wear now.
    Bottom line is that I think it is very unlikely that all those onboard were contaminated without anyone knowing about it fairly quickly.
    Not saying it couldn't happen, I've seen a lot of very unlikely things happen aboard ship, but it is very unlikely. This may have a lot to do with the class action lawsuit that is in progress. Time will tell.

    If something does come out of this legally, I think the Navy would be obligated to provide at least the same medical care injured vets from Iraq and Afghanistan receive. It's not enough, but it's better than nothing. After all we have many warzone vets that can make the same argument for exposure to all kinds of things in the sandbox.
    "I never saw a wild thing sorry for itself. A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough without ever having felt sorry for itself." -DH Lawrence
    "We do not see things as they are, we see things as we are." - The Talmud

  23. #23
    Yes at least give them the care from a warzone - as for time - people in Japan are already staring to present with cancers and other side effects, that was true a year after the Russian accident as well - I am not saying this is the case here because we don't have enough links yet but it is also totally possible that it could be.

    As for actual exposure, well there are two issues here, one the Japanese government LIED to their own people and the US about what had actually happened, and sadly it doesn't take very long for serious amounts of radiation to a lot of damage. Two, as Europe discovered after the Russian disaster, sometimes levels of radiation thought to be "safe" are not really; at least not all the time and not for everyone.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Purdy area, Western WA
    Posts
    22,258

    6

    Quote Originally Posted by TerryK View Post
    Yes there was some contamination of the ship's surface and some of the crewmembers doing helo and small boat rescue and survey received some doses of radiation.
    Most of which fell within the acceptable dose limits for rad workers. All nuclear ships have extensive and continuous radiation monitoring. Also all crew members working around the reactor continuously wear radiation monitors which are read frequently. It is almost a sure thing that all those involved in rescue and survey operations also wore radiation monitors.
    When I was a rad worker in the Navy we wore TLDs on our belts and additional monitoring equipment when working on or near the reactor. Don't know what they wear now.
    Bottom line is that I think it is very unlikely that all those onboard were contaminated without anyone knowing about it fairly quickly.
    Not saying it couldn't happen, I've seen a lot of very unlikely things happen aboard ship, but it is very unlikely. This may have a lot to do with the class action lawsuit that is in progress. Time will tell.

    If something does come out of this legally,
    I think the Navy would be obligated to provide at least the same medical care injured vets from Iraq and Afghanistan receive. It's not enough, but it's better than nothing. After all we have many warzone vets that can make the same argument for exposure to all kinds of things in the sandbox.
    BOY, does THAT sound like it comes STRAIGHT FROM A GOVERNMENT SHILL MOUTHPIECE.
    You are Trying to confuse and obfuscate the radiation exposure OF THE FUKISHIMA INCIDENT with normal radiation protocal and procedures aboard a nuclear powered ship!
    T
    ALL THE SAILORS DRANK, ATE FOOD PREPARED WITH, BATHED IN,highly radioactive water and cleaned radioactive contaminants from the ship deck, water system, showers, kitchen, laundry, toilets etc EVERYWHERE WATER WAS USED IN THE SHIP TO WASH FLOORS ETC. HIGHLY RADIOACTIVE WATER! It was not confined to a few crew members!
    Poison Ivy is still Poison Ivy even if you transplant it into a rose garden and call it a rose.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    WI - On the scene, like a sex machine.
    Posts
    24,124
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    (Redirected from Turner Radio Network)

    Hal Turner
    Born Harold Charles Turner
    March 15, 1962 (age 51)
    Jersey City, New Jersey

    Occupation Radio host


    Harold Charles "Hal" Turner (born March 15, 1962) is an American white nationalist, Holocaust denier[1] and blogger from North Bergen, New Jersey. In August 2010, he was convicted for making threats against three federal judges with the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Prior to Turner's arrest, his radio program, The Hal Turner Show, was a webcast from his home once a week.

    more,

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turner_Radio_Network
    "The most intriguing point for the historian is that where history and legend meet."

    "None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who think they are free."

    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Purdy area, Western WA
    Posts
    22,258
    Quote Originally Posted by Hfcomms View Post
    I highly doubt the veracity of the story. This one entity reporting it is suspect and the others reporting it reference this story. It is simply much to early post exposure to develop thyroid cancer. 10 years from now I could buy but not a few years post exposure. This needs to be verified by other sources. If accurate, it couldn't be suppressed.
    I AGREE WITH COUNTRY MOUSE! You are foolish to say that after knowing how much outrageous, yet pervasive violations of rights have been revealed to have been going on for YEARS secretly by our own government! Those ARE "famous last words!"
    Poison Ivy is still Poison Ivy even if you transplant it into a rose garden and call it a rose.

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Purdy area, Western WA
    Posts
    22,258
    Quote Originally Posted by Hfcomms View Post
    I highly doubt the veracity of the story. This one entity reporting it is suspect and the others reporting it reference this story. It is simply much to early post exposure to develop thyroid cancer. 10 years from now I could buy but not a few years post exposure. This needs to be verified by other sources. If accurate, it couldn't be suppressed.
    THE YOUNGER YOU ARE, THE FASTER YOU GET THYROID CANCER FROM RADIATION. Didn't you know that?
    This article demonstrates Japanese stonewalling and denial http://rt.com/news/fukushima-childre...id-cancer-783/
    It also says 90% of the people exposed DO NOT MEET THE "criteria set" to get screened for radiation and radiation caused cancers and disease! The government does not WANT to know the real numbers.
    THESE kids are swimming in the ocean, on a beach just 39 miles south of the FUKISHIMA nuke plant:
    Attached Images
    Last edited by ainitfunny; 12-14-2013 at 07:59 PM.
    Poison Ivy is still Poison Ivy even if you transplant it into a rose garden and call it a rose.

  28. #28
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Cow Hampshire
    Posts
    11,253
    I AGREE WITH COUNTRY MOUSE! You are foolish to say that after knowing how much outrageous, yet pervasive violations of rights have been revealed to have been going on for YEARS secretly by our own government! Those ARE "famous last words!"
    Um. We're not talking to a co-conspirer here. I am willing to give TerryK some breathing room to express an outlook based on experience.

    If you want to know air conditioners, you talk to someone who has fixed an air conditioner. You might not agree it's cold enough for your comfort, but your disagreement can come when you negotiate the bill. In this case, the bill is non-existent. TerryK offers his comment freely and without cost.

    As have you. As have I.

    I might add that capitals and red lettering are usually assumed to be someone YELLING. Kind of shrill and humans who yell SCARE me. Not the least of which for reason humans are the ones who are supposed to be in control. Yelling may indicate loss of control - not conducive to rational discussion.

    And I'm not sure at this point whether a scream is warranted.

    The latest revelation from Turner is nearly 6 months late. I have not doubt the lawyers are expecting to be paid well.

    And we will see.

    Dobbin
    I hinnire propter hoc ecce ego

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Purdy area, Western WA
    Posts
    22,258
    If you "don't like" THAT MESSENGER then GO HERE and stop sticking your head in the sand! http://www.ksl.com/?sid=26440227&nid=148
    CLICK HERE to print this page

    Sailor believes illness due to radiation from service in Japan
    August 14, 2013


    WASHINGTON — A Utah sailor who served on board the USS Ronald Reagan, the first ship to respond to the 2011 earthquake and tsunami at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Japan, is sick.

    Now Lt. j.g. Steve Simmons, with the U.S. Navy, wants answers, accountability and a treatment plan. But the Department of Defense says its expert testing does not substantiate the radiation sickness.

    A tsunami set off by the magnitude-9.0 earthquake on March 11, 2011, killed nearly 19,000 people and damaged the nuclear reactors at a plant in Fukushima, causing meltdowns and radiation leaks.

    Simmons served on the USS Reagan, off the shore of Japan, as it supported recovery efforts for more than a month.

    "We knew that something was going on,” he said. “They didn't hide the fact that there was a radiation leak from the power plant that was melting down."

    But he's not sure the Navy or any of the 5,500 on board knew of the severity.

    Over the last 21 months, Simmons said his health has melted down, too, and he's not alone.

    “I just don’t think they really knew the full scale of how bad it truly was,” he said.

    Simmons and his wife, Summer, from Stansbury Park, have spent many days at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Washington, D.C., seeing doctors and getting treatment.

    "We've never had any kind of health issues until he was exposed to radiation from Fukushima,” she said.

    He believes he's suffering from radioactive contamination, but his doctors won't say that. "There's really nothing else that I know of that could have caused it,” he said.

    After November 2011, Simmons said he went from being a fitness buff always up for a challenging hike to a shaking and withering patient who cannot walk on his own. He’s lost 25 pounds, down to 128 pounds, and lost 25 percent to 30 percent of his muscle mass.

    "The muscle weakness has progressed to the point where he needs 24-hour care,” his wife said.

    He’s been in and out of the hospital getting treated for his symptoms, but doctors won’t provide a diagnosis, he said. He and his wife are currently living in Maryland to be near the hospital.


    Lt. j.g. Steve Simmons with the U.S. Navy served on board the USS Ronald Reagan, the first ship to respond to the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear disaster in Japan on March 11, 2011. Since November of that year, he has been sick. He believes he is suffering from radioactive contamination, but doctors won't give him a diagnosis. (Photo: Simmons Family)
    "Our biggest frustration is the lack of accountability,” she said. “The fact that nobody is willing to say this was a mistake, and it needs to be acknowledged."

    The maximum potential radiation dose for personnel on the ship was less than one month's exposure to natural background radiation from rocks, soil and sun, the Department of Defense said in a prepared statement.

    "The very low levels of residual radioactivity that did deposit on the ship were mitigated and controlled," it said.

    Attorney Paul C. Garner, representing 150 former sailors and Marines, has sued the Japanese power company and is seeking $3 billion to be set up in a fund to help victims.

    Simmons is not part of the lawsuit.

    “We’re not asking for much,” she said. We’re asking for the Navy to do for us what we’ve done for them. We’re asking them to step up and take care of those they put in harm’s way.”

    He's especially concerned about the younger sailors and Marines. “Their lives are at stake as well,” he said.

    He has served in the Navy for 16 years and had expected to stay well past 20 years.

    “Those were the hopes and dreams that I had,” he said.

    Without a diagnosis of his illness, Simmons finds himself ineligible for assistance from most of the nonprofits that help wounded soldiers with accessible housing. The family is using the fundraising site crowdtilt to raise $300,000 to build a home in Utah.*

    "There are lots of people out there who want to do something, and they don't know how to help,” she said. “This is an opportunity for those people to actually help."

    *ksl.com has not verified the accuracy of the information provided with respect to the account nor does ksl.com assure that the monies deposited to the account will be applied for the benefit of the persons named as beneficiaries. If you are considering a deposit to the account you should consult your own advisors and otherwise proceed at your own risk.
    Poison Ivy is still Poison Ivy even if you transplant it into a rose garden and call it a rose.

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    12,436
    Quote Originally Posted by ainitfunny View Post
    BOY, does THAT sound like it comes STRAIGHT FROM A GOVERNMENT SHILL MOUTHPIECE.
    You are Trying to confuse and obfuscate the radiation exposure OF THE FUKISHIMA INCIDENT with normal radiation protocal and procedures aboard a nuclear powered ship!
    T
    ALL THE SAILORS DRANK, ATE FOOD PREPARED WITH, BATHED IN,highly radioactive water and cleaned radioactive contaminants from the ship deck, water system, showers, kitchen, laundry, toilets etc EVERYWHERE WATER WAS USED IN THE SHIP TO WASH FLOORS ETC. HIGHLY RADIOACTIVE WATER! It was not confined to a few crew members!
    No Aint, I am not trying to confuse the two or obfuscate anything. All I am saying, based on being a Navy rad worker and 20 years in the Navy, is that on a nuclear ship, there is extensive and continuous radiation monitoring. People on the ship are not going to receive any great amount of radiation without it being detected.

    Don't believe everything in the article. Remember the crew on a modern aircraft carrier is over 5000. The water inside the ship was not highly radioactive.
    Fresh water on a Navy ship is produced by distilling sea water in a multistage distillation process. Input to the desalinization plants are shut down when the ship is in extremely dirty or contaminated water.
    Could some members of the crew been contaminated? Sure, especially those who were involved in rescue and survey ops, or even those involved in deconning the flight deck and aircraft, but active radiation monitoring was happening on site during these operations. Those people involved in those operations had their radiation dose monitored and a few did receive significant radiation.

    Could the entire crew have received large doses of radiation due to simply using the fresh water system? Nope because of several reasons. First the nuclear plant personnel would have shown the contamination when they were regularly monitored, second the fresh water plants were shut down when in possibly contaminated water, third radiation sensors are located in many locations on nuclear ships and I would be willing to bet that many many more were in operation during their time off of Fuki.

    As I said before. All the info is not out. The original article is a sensational one sided panic piece with no substantiated data. Give it some time and the true facts will surface.
    If the sailor's cancers are found to be the result of radiation exposure, they should receive the same care that other vets receive.
    The military is not a civilian job. It has hundreds or risks and dangers that the average civilian is never exposed to.
    Last edited by TerryK; 12-14-2013 at 08:43 PM.
    "I never saw a wild thing sorry for itself. A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough without ever having felt sorry for itself." -DH Lawrence
    "We do not see things as they are, we see things as we are." - The Talmud

  31. #31
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Cow Hampshire
    Posts
    11,253
    Thank you Aintit. Now find new information. Or other slants on older info.

    And sources other than my nuclear buddy Arnie. Everyone KNOWS what he is going to say ahead of time.

    Collecting and showing information - and informing others is what we do around here. Something other than the mainstream - which we all know is controlled by basically one entity.

    Need I wonder why MSNBC seems to have not made this front line?

    Dobbin
    I hinnire propter hoc ecce ego

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Purdy area, Western WA
    Posts
    22,258
    Quote Originally Posted by Dobbin View Post
    Thank you Aintit. Now find new information. Or other slants on older info.

    And sources other than my nuclear buddy Arnie. Everyone KNOWS what he is going to say ahead of time.

    Collecting and showing information - and informing others is what we do around here. Something other than the mainstream - which we all know is controlled by basically one entity.

    Need I wonder why MSNBC seems to have not made this front line?

    Dobbin
    I'm on it.
    Poison Ivy is still Poison Ivy even if you transplant it into a rose garden and call it a rose.

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Purdy area, Western WA
    Posts
    22,258

    19

    How do you like THIS!?
    Fukushima And The Navy: Sailors Sue Japan Nuclear Plant Owner, Saying Disaster Made Them Sick
    Posted: 03/11/2013 8:53 pm EDT | Updated: 03/12/2013 8:37 am EDT

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/0...n_2855529.html
    Within weeks of setting off a geiger counter and scrubbing three layers of skin off his hands and arms, former Navy quartermaster Maurice Enis recalled being pressured to sign away U.S. government liability for any future health problems.

    Enis and about 5,000 fellow sailors aboard the USS Ronald Reagan aircraft carrier had finally left Japan, after 80-some days aiding victims of the March 11, 2011, Fukushima earthquake and tsunami, and were about to take a long-awaited port call in Thailand.

    But first, they were told they needed to fill out some paperwork.

    "They had us sign off that we were medically fine, had no sickness, and that we couldn't sue the U.S. government," Enis told The Huffington Post, recalling widespread anger among the sailors who saw it as "B.S." but who also felt they had little choice.


    On Monday, the two-year anniversary of the Fukushima disaster, Enis joined a lawsuit with more than 100 other service members who participated in the rescue mission and who have since developed medical issues they contend are related to radioactive fallout from the disabled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. Rather than targeting the U.S. government, the federal lawsuit names plant owner Tokyo Electric Power Co. the defendant.

    TEPCO, as the company is known, provided false information to U.S. officials about the extent of spreading radiation from its stricken reactors, according to Roger Witherspoon on his blog Energy Matters.

    Among the lawsuit plaintiffs is Enis' girlfriend, Jaime Plym, who also served as a quartermaster on the aircraft carrier, a position that involves guiding the ship and spending significant time on deck. The couple had been looking forward to leaving the military and starting a family. Now, Enis said, they don't know if children will be an option due to health problems they've both developed since signing away government liability. They've both been honorably discharged from the military and don't know how they will pay for medical treatment.


    Plym has a new diagnosis of asthma and her menstrual cycle is severely out of whack. Enis has lumps on his jaw, between his eyes and on his thigh. He's also developed stomach ulcers and lung problems, and is losing weight and hair.

    There's a tradition of growing out your hair and beard after leaving the Navy, explained Enis, to make up for all the time spent with a buzzed head. He said at a press conference in New York on Monday that he's hesitant to comb or wash his head of black curls lest he speed up the loss.


    Former Navy quartermaster Maurice Enis described the health problems, including hair loss, that he's suffered since working in radioactive plumes after the Fukushima disaster. (Lynne Peeples)
    It was more than a month after arriving off the coast of Japan -- and circling at distances of one to 10 miles from the crippled reactors -- when sailors aboard the carrier got word that a nuclear plant had been affected, according to Plym. "Even then, it was rumors," she said. And it wasn't until the USS Ronald Reagan had left Japan and sailors were scrubbing down the ship that they were offered radiation protection. Enis said the enlisted sailors were never offered any iodine. He said he later learned the "higher ups" -- officers and pilots -- had received the tablets to protect their thyroids from radiation damage.

    Enis said no one collected samples of sailors' blood or urine for tests. Neither Enis nor Plym have been fully evaluated by a doctor.

    In his series detailing the sailors' situation, Witherspoon highlighted questionable U.S. government decisions that followed Fukushima, such as the halt of a federal medical registry planned for nearly 70,000 American service members, civilian workers and their families who may have been exposed. The Department of Defense "concluded that their estimates of the maximum possible whole body and thyroid doses of contaminants were not severe enough to warrant further examination," Witherspoon reported.

    Without the registry, Witherspoon added, there will be "no way to determine if patterns of health problems emerge" as a result of radiation exposure among military personnel stationed in Japan, or among those just offshore with the USS Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group 7.

    Enis recalled one day that convinced him of a connection.

    He described at the press conference retrieving the American flag that had flown atop the carrier to give to the people of Japan as a ceremonial gesture. The wind, he recalled, caused the flag to flap around his body as he brought it down by rope. Only later did he realize the flag and the rope were probably highly contaminated with radiation.

    After folding the flag, he went out to eat with his buddy. The two joked about growing extra fingers and toes, Enis said. Talk of a radiation leak had begun spreading onboard, despite being downplayed by officials. On a whim, the friends decided to get checked for radiation. His friend tested clean, but the geiger went crazy on Enis' hands.
    "Instantly, we went from smiling to just being nervous and scared," Enis recalled. "No one told me at the time what was going on."
    Poison Ivy is still Poison Ivy even if you transplant it into a rose garden and call it a rose.

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Smallville
    Posts
    8,658
    TerryK, your first hand, real world experience, knowledge, and logic can not begin to compete with a conned-spiracy theorist's conspiracy theory and doom fest.

    Then to, the environmental attorney leading this lawsuit posted on his website that he truly cares about the environment. How can you beat that?

  35. #35
    I'd be interested in seeing the ships' logs-I'd look to see what levels of radiation were received by the ship and crew when they were on ops off the Japanese coast. Rad Levels would have been recorded somewhere in the course of operations , with any luck an FOIA request may make them available.
    I have no doubt as to the validity of the sailors' claims-After Chernobyl cancer levels spiked within 2 years of the accident there. And, responders at the World Trade center after 9/11 are suffering health issues from all the airborne junk they breathed in. These sailors did the same thing.
    It's doubly sad to hear of this-our soldiers get hurt helping others in a humanitarian mission and the fact that they're all so young.

  36. #36
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    667
    I'll chime in on this as well. I worked on a carrier for a while. Couldn't happen. Pure and simple. There are so many radiation and other sensors on those ships it boggles the mind. I'd wager anyone that went topside during that had a rad badge on. Three years is waaaaaaaaay to short to show symptoms and all convenient at the same time.

  37. #37
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Purdy area, Western WA
    Posts
    22,258
    You want other sources? Different stories from other Sailors?
    Here ya go.
    San Diego Union Tribune:
    http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2013/...?#article-copy
    Did Japan's radiation sicken U.S. sailors?
    USS Ronald Reagan crew members describe illness; medical experts are skeptical

    By Jeanette Steele NOON JAN. 12, 2013
    For more than three weeks following the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, U.S. Navy sailor Lindsay Cooper set off a contamination warning when she left the flight deck of the aircraft carrier Ronald Reagan.

    A hand-held Geiger counter beeped when it passed over her, and she had to surrender a glove and boots more than once.


    Lindsay Cooper, a former Navy sailor who served on the aircraft carrier Ronald Reagan's flight deck during the rescue mission Operation Tomodachi in March 2011. — Courtesy of Lindsay Cooper
    So perhaps it’s no wonder that Cooper, 23, and seven other Reagan sailors think that physical ailments since then are due to exposure to radioactive material from the meltdown at Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant.

    Eight sailors have filed a lawsuit against the Japanese power company, alleging that officials lied about the amount of leakage. It says the Navy used the company’s reports in its own calculations about the safety of U.S. sailors in the relief effort, called Operation Tomodachi.

    The sailors describe rectal bleeding and other gastrointestinal trouble, unremitting headaches, hair loss and fatigue. Their lawyer says some already have thyroid and gallbladder cancer. All are in their 20s. One sailor, who was ordered to clean the Reagan’s air ducts, vomited soon after and felt sick enough to ask to leave the ship, the attorney said.

    A ninth plaintiff in the suit is the 1-year-old daughter of a female sailor who didn’t know she was pregnant at the time. Pregnant mothers and children are more vulnerable to radiation.

    But, contrary to what these sailors are experiencing, studies have found largely nondangerous radiation levels since the 2011 spill. Only workers at the nuclear facility have exhibited radiation amounts high enough to make them even slightly sick, scientists consulted for this story said.

    One UC San Diego toxicology expert said that acute illness usually comes on quickly — in days or weeks — after massive exposure. Signs include nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.

    Unless there are fatalities, people feel better within a few months. So, with typical radiation sickness, these Reagan sailors wouldn’t still have symptoms today.

    Long-term illnesses, such as cancer, may result from a smaller amount of radiation exposure, but the amount required to cause them is unclear. And that type of ailment wouldn’t come on this soon, less than two years after the incident, said Dr. Richard Clark, director of UCSD’s medical toxicology program.

    “What I imagined happened in this case is these people developed a few symptoms and they started to get worried about it because they were told there was some higher radiation,” Clark said. “They scrubbed off the (Reagan’s) deck — that is normal procedure if there is fallout. But that fallout doesn’t mean you were exposed to levels of radiation that were dangerous.”

    At a Health Physics Society conference last year at the National Press Club, a panel of radiation scientists predicted that illness from Fukushima will be far less than from the 1986 Chernobyl reactor disaster.

    That’s because researchers knew enough in 2011 to advise people to stay indoors to avoid the passing radiation plume from the plant and to not consume food or milk or water from the region that might be contaminated.

    Less than 150 of 17,000 workers at the Fukushima plant showed slightly elevated levels of radiation, according to figures from cancer specialist Dr. John Boice, a member of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. The doses detected might increase their lifetime risk of cancer by 2 percent, he said at the Press Club conference.

    On the Reagan, the crew was ordered to close hatches and vents to prevent outside air from entering. They were also told not to drink the ship’s potable water.

    The environmental lawyer representing the Reagan sailors said their radiation exposure exceeded the acceptable level, but he declined to place a figure on how much he suspects they received.

    Attorney Paul Garner said he is awaiting disclosure from the Pentagon, the Navy and Japan about what their instruments showed. The Japanese Fukushima Daiichi power plant, on the coast 150 miles northeast of Tokyo, is owned by Tokyo Electric Power Co., or Tepco.

    “We know it was higher levels than have been initially reported by the Tepco people as being low dose,” Garner said. “It’s much worse than those who got radiation poisoning in Chernobyl and survived for a few years.”

    The U.S. Defense Department has created a registry for the 70,000 Pentagon-affiliated people who were in Japan or off the coast during the first three months of the disaster. A website for this registry said that it would provide radiation exposure estimates for all 70,000 by the end of 2012.

    However, figures for U.S. Navy ships serving off the coast of Japan — including the Reagan, and the San Diego-based warships Preble and Chancellorsville, plus the carrier George Washington and amphibious ship Essex, among several other American military vessels — are not yet available on the website.

    The Navy’s largest ship base in Japan — in Yokosuka, about 185 miles southwest of the nuclear plant — measured levels that are minimal and well below dangerous, according to Pentagon figures.

    Helicopters from the Reagan flew search and rescue missions over Japan in the days following the 9.0 earthquake and subsequent tsunami. In April 2011, Camp Pendleton Marines from the Essex went ashore to help clear debris on Oshima, an island 45 miles from earthquake’s epicenter.

    Garner said he plans to file additional lawsuits on behalf of other Navy and Marine Corps personnel who are now sick after Operation Tomodachi. The first lawsuit was filed Dec. 21 in San Diego federal court, and he expects to lodge a second there. Others may come in other jurisdictions.

    The lawyer said he and his partners have launched a medical study of American personnel involved in the rescue mission. Calling it Operation Tomodachi Revisited, he said it is open to more participants at no cost to the service member. Blood tests will be taken.

    Asked to comment on the lawsuit, Pentagon officials released a statement saying that the Navy took “proactive measures” to safeguard sailors.

    With more than 5,000 people aboard, the Reagan was operating at sea about 100 miles northeast of the power plant following the earthquake.


    Despite the ship passing through a plume of radioactivity, officials peg the maximum exposure to the crew at less than the radiation received from a month’s exposure to natural background radiation from sources such as rocks, soil and the sun.

    The Navy’s statement said that “most of this radioactivity did not deposit on the ship as the ship sailed through the plume and the very low levels of residual radioactivity that did deposit on the ship were mitigated and controlled.”

    Cooper said she participated in one flight deck wash down that occurred after the Reagan’s radiation alarms went off a few days into Operation Tomodachi. A Navy photo shows sailors, some with scarves worn across their faces and mouths, pushing brooms to scrub the deck with soap and water.

    Garner said that the Navy used seawater for that cleanup.

    Meanwhile, the tsunami’s waves breached the power plant, then washed back into the sea. A paper published by Stanford University in July estimated that most of the Fukushima radioactivity went into the Pacific and only 19 percent of the released material was deposited over land.

    Two days after the disaster, the Navy said it had repositioned the Reagan after detecting low levels of contamination in the air and on 17 aircrew members who flew relief missions. Previously, the carrier had been downwind from the nuclear site.

    Some aircrews were given iodine pills to combat the potential of radioactive iodide particles released by the plant. Garner said clients — seven boatswain’s mates who worked on the flight deck and an air decontamination specialist — weren’t offered iodine, he said.

    At the time, the Reagan’s skipper, Capt. Thom Burke released a statement reassuring crew families that “as a nuclear-power aircraft carrier, we have extensive technical expertise onboard to properly monitor such types of risks.”

    Garner said he believes the skipper as far as the carrier’s own nuclear reactors are monitored constantly for leaks.

    “However, I would love to see his data of readings on the crewmen,” the lawyer said.

    If he wins for his initial nine plaintiffs, Garner is seeking $10 million per client plus a $30 million punitive judgment against Tepco. The lawsuit also demands that the power company establish a $100 million fund to cover the sailors’ medical expenses.

    Cooper left the Navy in August 2011 after four years of service. She said she wants to find out what she was exposed to and what it means for her long-term health. A single mom to a daughter, she now attends college toward a criminal justice degree.

    “There’s so much that didn’t make sense from that period out in Japan. I want to know the truth and why it happened,” she said last week from her Spring Valley home.

    “I saw the symptoms for radiation overexposure — almost identical to what I had. And everybody else had the same symptoms. That was a huge red flag.”

    Her health problems really bloomed in July 2011 and still trouble her. She also believes she has post-traumatic stress from seeing bodies floating in the water during the rescue mission.

    Additionally, her mother died of breast cancer and Cooper is concerned that her exposure to the Fukushima plume has increased her chance of developing the same disease.

    “About a year ago we all talked to each other. I asked if any of them were having medical issues. Some said yes. Some said no,” Cooper said. “I offered (Garner’s) number to 100 people I’d worked with, and only eight were OK with (going forward). The rest were intimidated. The boat told us it was OK, and so it was OK (to them).”
    Last edited by ainitfunny; 12-15-2013 at 12:42 AM.
    Poison Ivy is still Poison Ivy even if you transplant it into a rose garden and call it a rose.

  38. #38
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Purdy area, Western WA
    Posts
    22,258
    Quote Originally Posted by Sid Vicious View Post
    I'll chime in on this as well. I worked on a carrier for a while. Couldn't happen. Pure and simple. There are so many radiation and other sensors on those ships it boggles the mind. I'd wager anyone that went topside during that had a rad badge on. Three years is waaaaaaaaay to short to show symptoms and all convenient at the same time.
    Here YOU go: http://enenews.com/nsfw-footage-alar...era-away-video
    NSFW: Footage of alarms going off during radiation scans on USS Ronald Reagan — “This is crazy… We’re dying and we’re taking videos of it” — “Hey put the camera away” (VIDEO)
    DIRECT YOU TUBE LINK TO VIDEO: http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Xk6Sy1c...%3DXk6Sy1cNgXo

    This guy is an educated IDIOT, or a shill for the government!
    http://www.komonews.com/news/nationa....html?mobile=y
    "I don't think that you can actually prove that," says San Diego State University professor and nuclear expert Murray Jennex.

    Jennex says that determining radiation levels in a person, and the direct effects on that person can easily be argued.

    "There is no science I know of that their lives are shortened," said Jennex. "But this is something that is way down the road. If it was an immediate exposure risk, they would have known that."
    Last edited by ainitfunny; 12-15-2013 at 12:06 AM.
    Poison Ivy is still Poison Ivy even if you transplant it into a rose garden and call it a rose.

  39. #39
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Cow Hampshire
    Posts
    11,253
    San Diego Union Tribune:

    That was actually a pretty good article. Balanced, describing symptoms, weighing possibilities. And some claim of cover-up which may be possible.

    Keep this up and you'll be as good a scanner as Ms. Kitty.

    Dobbin
    I hinnire propter hoc ecce ego

  40. #40
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Purdy area, Western WA
    Posts
    22,258
    http://spoonsenergymatters.wordpress...rican-sailors/
    Posted by: roger6t6 | January 31, 2013
    A Lasting Legacy of the Fukushima Rescue Mission: Part 1 Radioactive Contamination of American Sailors


    By Roger Witherspoon



    The Department of Defense has decided to walk away from an unprecedented medical registry of nearly 70,000 American service members, civilian workers, and their families caught in the radioactive clouds blowing from the destroyed nuclear power plants at Fukushima Daiichi in Japan.

    The decision to cease updating the registry means there will be no way to determine if patterns of health problems emerge among the members of the Marines, Army, Air Force, Corps of Engineers, and Navy stationed at 63 installations in Japan with their families. In addition, it leaves thousands of sailors and Marines in the USS Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group 7 on their own when it comes to determining if any of them are developing problems caused by radiation exposure.

    The strike group was detoured from its South Pacific duties and brought to Fukushima for Operation Tomodachi,which was named using the Japanese word for “friend.” It was an 80-day humanitarian aid and rescue mission in the wake of the earthquake and massive tsunami that decimated the northern coastline and killed more than 20,000 people. The rescue operation was requested by the Japanese Government and coordinated by the US State Department, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the Departments of Defense and Energy. In addition to the USS Ronald Reagan with its crew of 5,500, the Strike Group includetd four destroyers – The Preble, McCampbell, Curtis Wilbur, and McCain – the cruiser USS Chancellorsville, and several support ships ( http://bit.ly/11bfTqS ).



    It was the participants in Operation Tomodachi – land based truck drivers and helicopter crews, and carrier based aircraft and landing craft – who were repeatedly trying to guess where the radioactive clouds were blowing and steer paths out of the way. It was unsuccessful on more than one occasion, according to Defense Department records and participants, resulting in efforts to decontaminate ships travelling through contaminated waters and cleansing helicopters only to send them right back into radioactive clouds.

    So far, more than 150 service men and women who participated in the rescue mission and have since developed a variety of medical issues – including tumors, tremors, internal bleeding, and hair loss – which they feel were triggered by their exposure to radiation. They do not blame the Navy for their predicament, but are joined in an expanding law suit against the Tokyo Electric Power Company, TEPCO, for providing false information to the US officials about the extent of spreading radiation from its stricken reactors at Fukushima. And the decision by the Defense Department to abandon the registry leaves them on their own. ( http://bit.ly/XpfJW5 )

    Jobs are compartmentalized at sea explained Navy Quartermasters Maurice Enis and Jaime Plym, two of the navigators on the carrier Reagan. Few of those on board knew there were dangerous radioactive plumes blowing in the wind and none knew what ocean currents might be contaminated. They did know there were problems when alarms went off.

    We make our own water through desalinization plants on board,” said Plym, a 28-year-old from St. Augustine, Florida. “But it comes from the ocean and the ocean was contaminated. So we had to get rid of all the water on the ship and keep scouring it and testing it till it was clean.

    “You have a nuclear power plant inside the ship that uses water for cooling, and they didn’t want to contaminate our reactor with their reactors’ radiation.”

    But avoiding it was not easy. It meant going far enough out to sea where there were no contaminated currents, washing down the ship and its pipes, and then going back towards shore.

    “We could actually see the certain parts of the navigation chart where radiation was at, and to navigate through that was nerve wracking,” said Enis. “The general public, like the ship, didn’t really know where it was or what it was and relied on word-of-mouth and rumors. We have more information, but there was no absolute way for us to know how much radiation was out there because we were still being told by the (Japanese) power company that we shouldn’t worry.



    We stayed about 80 days, and we would stay as close as two miles offshore and then sail away. It was a cat and mouse game depending on which way the wind was blowing. We kept coming back because it was a matter of helping the people of Japan who needed help. But it would put us in a different dangerous area. After the first scare and we found there was radiation when they (the power company) told us there was none, we went on lockdown and had to carry around the gas masks.”

    When it came to getting timely information on radiation, the Americans on land were just as much at sea. Gregory Jaczko, then Chairman of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, urged the evacuation of all Americans within 50 miles of the stricken reactors. And the Defense Department evacuated women and children from the Yokosuka Naval Base, located about 185 miles south of Fukushima, after sensors picked up increases in background radiation.

    Information was hard to come by, exacerbated by the rigidity of the Japanese bureaucracy. Two nuclear experts at the Union of Concerned Scientists, David Lochbaum, who has worked as a consultant for the NRC and industry, and Ed Lyman, a nuclear physicist, have examined thousands of government emails and cable traffic during a confusing period where the data base shifted by the hour and concrete information was hard to come by.

    “After the explosion in Fukushima Daiichi Unit #4 the Japanese were not able to get enough water into the building to keep the spent fuel pool cool,” Lochbaum said. “So the US airlifted a concrete pumper truck all the way from Australia to an American naval base in the northern part of the island. And the Japanese would not let it leave the base because it wasn’t licensed to travel on Japanese roads. Given the magnitude of their problems, that seemed to be the wrong priority.


    “But the Japanese culture is more like a symphony, where everyone follows the conductor’s lead. Whereas American society is more like a jazz ensemble where everyone is playing together, but improvisation is prized.”

    The inability to get cohesive, trustworthy information from the Japanese hampered the American rescue effort.



    Michael Sebourn, senior chief mechanic for the helicopter squadron based at Atsugi, about 60 miles from Fukushima, recalled that “after the earthquake and tsunami we were given one day notice to pack up the command and go to Misawa, Japan Air Base to provide relief efforts to the Sendai and Fukushima areas. All of the other squadrons were evacuating to Guam. There was a big possibility that the base at Atsugi would be shut down and we would never be returning. We were told to put our names and phone numbers on the dashboards of the cars because we would probably not get them back.

    “We were in Misawa 3 ½ weeks, working every day, flying mission after mission after mission to pick people up, rescue people, ferry supplies and things like that. There were a few nuclear technicians scanning individuals coming back from missions. Many times they would cut off their uniforms.”

    Sebourn was sent to Guam for three days of intensive training and became the designated radiation officer. It wasn’t easy.

    “This was a completely unprecedented event,” he said. “We had never dealt with radiation before. We were completely brand new to everything and everyone was clueless. We had had drills dealing with chemical and biological warfare. But we never had any drills dealing with radiation. That was nuclear stuff and we didn’t do nuclear stuff. The aviation guys had never dealt with radiation before. We had never had aircraft that was radiated. So we were completely flying blind.”

    There were rules for Sebourn’s group of mechanics. They scanned the returning helicopters for radiation, and then removed any contaminated parts and put them in special containers filled with water and stored on an isolated tarmac. It began snowing in Misawa so the group moved back to their base at Atsugi, closer to Fukushima. Sebourn tracked varying radiation levels in units called Corrected Counts Per Minute on their electronic detectors.

    “Normal outside radiation exposure is between five and 10 CCPM,” he said. “And that’s from the sun. At Atsugi, the background readings were between 200 and 300 CCPM in the air. It was all over. The water was radiated. The ground was radiated. The air was radiated.

    “The rule was if there was anything over a count of 500 you needed special gloves. Over 1,000 CCPM and you needed a Tyvek radiation suit. And if it was over 5,000 you needed an entire outfit – suit, respirator, goggles, and two sets of gloves. You couldn’t put a contaminated radiator back into the helicopters – they had to be replaced. I remember pulling out a radiator and it read 60,000 CCPM.”

    But in the end, the safety equipment may not have been enough.

    The Tomodachi Medical Registry, developed over a two year period and completed at the end of 2012, was a collective effort of the Departments of Defense, Energy, and Veterans Affairs launched at the insistence of Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, chairman of the Senate Veterans Affairs Committee. ( http://bit.ly/14ABPuj )

    It was an exhaustive registry essential to develop a medical baseline from which to determine if there were any long lasting repercussions from exposure to radioactivity – particularly iodine and cesium – spewing for months from the Fukushima Daiichi reactor units 1 through 4 into both the air and the sea.

    The Registry was unparalleled in its depth. The Defense Department’s 252-page assessment of radiation doses the 70,000 Americans may have been exposed to is broken down by a host of factors, including proximity to Fukushima, the type of work being done and its impact on breathing rates, changing weather patterns, sex, size, and age. In the latter category children were divided into six different age groups, reflecting their varying susceptibility to radiation. ( http://bit.ly/U42a1X ).

    In addition, the report states “over 8,000 individuals were monitored for internal radioactive materials and the results of those tests were compared with the calculated doses.”

    In the end, however, the Department concluded that their estimates of the maximum possible whole body and thyroid doses of contaminants were not severe enough to warrant further examination.

    Navy spokesman Lt. Matthew Allen, in a written statement, said “The DoD has very high confidence in the accuracy of the dose estimates, which were arrived at using highly conservative exposure assumptions (i.e., assuming individuals were outside 24 hours a day for the 60 days in which for environmental radiation levels were elevated and while breathing at higher than normal rates).

    “The estimated doses were closely reviewed by the Veterans’ Advisory Board on Dose Reconstruction and by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements who both agreed that the methods used to calculate the estimates were appropriate and the results accurate. In addition the dose estimates were consistent with the estimates made by the Japanese government and by the World Health Organization.”

    Defense Department spokeswoman Cynthia Smith added that as a result of the agency’s decision that there was no serious contamination, “There are no health surveillance measures required for any member of the DoD-affiliated population who was on or near the mainland of Japan following the accident and subsequent radiological release from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station beginning on or about March 11, 2011.”

    But there are skeptics of the Defense Department’s blanket conclusion that there was not enough radiation poured into the environment to warrant continuous monitoring of the men, women, and children living and working there.

    “Radiation does not spread in a homogeneous mix,” said Lochbaum. “There are hot spots and low spots and nobody knows who is in a high zone or in a low zone. Who knows what the actual radiation dose to an individual is? There are no measurements of what they consumed in water and food.

    “This is the Navy’s best attempt to take a few data points they have and extrapolate over the entire group. They took a lot of measurements, but those represent just a point in time. It’s like taking a strobe light outside to take a picture of a nighttime scene. Every time the strobe flashes you will get shots in spots of the area. But do you really capture all of the darkness?”

    –Winifred Bird contributed reporting from Japan


    RelatedA Lasting Legacy of the Fukushima Rescue Mission: Part 3: Cat and Mouse with a Nuclear Ghost
    In "Carrier Strike Group"A Lasting Legacy of the Fukushima Rescue Mission: Part 4 Living with the Aftermath
    In "Carrier Strike Group"A Lasting Legacy of the Fukushima Rescue Mission: Part 2: The Navy Life – Into the Abyss
    In "Carrier Strike Group"
    Posted in Army, Carrier Strike Group, Department of Defense, Fukushima Daiichi, Fukushima Daini, Fukushima nuclear power, Japanese Reactors, Marines, nuclear accidents, nuclear catastrophe, Nuclear Energy, nuclear fuel fire, nuclear power, nuclear reactor meltdowns, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Operation Tomodachi, spent fuel fire, spent fuel rods, TEPCO, US Air Force, US Navy, USS Ronald Reagan | Tags: David Lochbaum, Department of Defense, Department of Energy, Fukushima Daiichi, health registry, Japan nuclear, Japanese reactors, NRC, nuclear accidents, nuclear power, nuclear power plant meltdowns, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Operation Tomodachi, radioactive contamination, radioactive releases, science, TEPCO, tsunami, Tyvek, Union of Concerned Scientists, uss chancellorsville, USS Ronald Reagan
    Last edited by ainitfunny; 12-15-2013 at 12:38 AM.
    Poison Ivy is still Poison Ivy even if you transplant it into a rose garden and call it a rose.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts


NOTICE: Timebomb2000 is an Internet forum for discussion of world events and personal disaster preparation. Membership is by request only. The opinions posted do not necessarily represent those of TB2K Incorporated (the owner of this website), the staff or site host. Responsibility for the content of all posts rests solely with the Member making them. Neither TB2K Inc, the Staff nor the site host shall be liable for any content.

All original member content posted on this forum becomes the property of TB2K Inc. for archival and display purposes on the Timebomb2000 website venue. Said content may be removed or edited at staff discretion. The original authors retain all rights to their material outside of the Timebomb2000.com website venue. Publication of any original material from Timebomb2000.com on other websites or venues without permission from TB2K Inc. or the original author is expressly forbidden.



"Timebomb2000", "TB2K" and "Watching the World Tick Away" are Service Mark℠ TB2K, Inc. All Rights Reserved.