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FOOD Possible grocery list-$200 for 1 person for one month...
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Purdy area, Western WA
    Posts
    22,898

    5 Possible grocery list-$200 for 1 person for one month...

    I made this list a little while ago, when Food Stamps for one person was $200 for one person for one month, as a sort of guide to make sure you don't go over that and still get enough for a month. Now it is $186 so it would require a little editing to stay within that limit.
    Some things are bit more some less in different areas and some you need to watch for sales to stretch the dollars...In re-examining, I probably would skip the graham crackers and get a can or two of cheap tuna. What kind of grocery list would you propose to help people select a variety of food that WILL/Should last one person for a month?

    I wrote it on NOTEPAD and apparently it isn't displaying, sorry I will try to convert it to some other format. (it is .txt)
    Okay, I copied and pasted it and that worked.
    FOOD FOR ONE PERSON FOR ONE MONTH
    MODEL GROCERY LIST
    October 29, 2013 (sale/cheap/generic/coupon prices)

    10lb potatoes $ 2.00
    3- 1LB PKS HOT DOGS 5.00
    5lb flour 2.00
    1lb iodized salt 1.00
    1 bottle catsup 1.50
    1 jar mustard 1.50
    4 Loaves Bread 6.00
    3 half gallon boxes ultra-milk 9.00
    2 18pk eggs 6.00
    _______
    34.00
    1 lb butter 2.50
    1 lb sliced bologna 1.50
    1 lb sliced salami 1.50
    1 jar peanut butter 18oz 3.00
    1 bag pancake mix 3.00
    1 jar syrup 3.00
    1 jar Miracle whip 3.00
    1/2 gal orange juice 2.50
    1 box 100 tea bags 3.00
    1 jar 12oz instant coffee 7.50
    1 5lb bag sugar/sweetner 3.00
    _______
    subtotal 63.50
    1 bag onions 2.00
    2 1lb bags frozen green beans/peas 3.00
    1 2lb bag fresh carrots 2.00
    3 heads iceberg lettuce 3.75
    1 lb pasta (spaghetti) 1.00
    1 can RAGU SAUCE 1.00
    5 lb pkg hamburger 13.00
    4 lb bananas 2.00
    1 costco roast chicken 5.00
    1 pk sliced cheese 1.75
    1 head garlic .50
    2 cans generic tomato soup 1.50
    _______
    total 100.00

    NEXT hundred dollars:
    1 bag frozen shrimp 6.00
    3 boxes rice-a-roni 3.00
    3 bags of Lipton noodles alfredo/etc 3.00
    3 cans spinach 2.50
    3 sweet potatoes 1.50
    apples 3.00
    oranges/mandarins 3.00
    Generic Cold Cereal 5.00
    Oatmeal 3.00
    Canned pork and beans 3.00
    5 lb white rice 4.00
    1 lb bacon 3.50
    1 bag frozen mixed veggies 2.00
    fresh strawberries(freeze in small pks) 2.50
    cooking oil 4.50
    vinegar 1.00
    pickles 3.00
    _______
    subtotal 56.50
    2 lb margarine 1.50
    1 jar grape JAM 2.00
    1 PK HOT DOG BUNS 1.50
    1 JAR HORSERADISH 1.50
    Asst PORK cuts 7.50
    1 lb brown sugar 1.50
    Generic Kool-Aid to make jello 2.00
    unflavored gelatin 2.50
    Vanilla ice cream 3.00
    10 pk hot cocoa mix 1.50
    sour cream 1.50
    cottage cheese 1.50
    tomatoes 2.50
    _______
    subtotal 86.50
    Cake mix 1.00
    2 jiffy cornmeal mix 2.50
    2 cans kidney beans(for chili) 1.50
    2 cans tomato paste 1.50
    1 green pepper (cut in quarter and freeze) 1.00
    1 piece of beef to cut up for stew 2.50
    1 bag of shredded cabbage for slaw 1.00
    1 bottle salad dressing (ranch) 1.50
    1 box saltine crackers 2.00
    1 box of graham crackers 2.00
    _______
    TOTAL 100.00
    Attached Files
    What are you going to pay for it? I can probably get it for you cheaper, ask me.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    East Tennessee
    Posts
    9,654
    Miracle Whip??????

    FREAK!!!!!


    "You don't change the way people think by changing what they say. You change the way people think with HEADLESS CHARRED BODIES FLYING THROUGH THE AIR. BLOOD! FLAMES! HELLFIRE AND DAMNATION!"
    ~~ Alastair J. R. Young

    "Bring me tools and beer!!!" ~~ Homer Simpson

    "If a dream is all that I got, then I wish you in a fairy tale where you are still in love with me." ~~ Cold

    "All weather is now manufactured. Period."
    ~~Scott Stevens

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Southwest Texas on the Gulf
    Posts
    555
    Okay, a head of cabbage would be cheaper than a bag of cabbage, Could get three meals out of it. And still cost a 1.00.
    Make your own cornbread with a five pound bag of cornmeal, cheaper than Jiffy corn mix.
    Make your own salad dressing by buying the ranch powder mix.
    Some of those box mixes are terrible, like rice a roni.
    What good are hot dog buns without wieners

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Purdy area, Western WA
    Posts
    22,898
    Quote Originally Posted by Old as dirt View Post
    Okay, a head of cabbage would be cheaper than a bag of cabbage, Could get three meals out of it. And still cost a 1.00.
    Make your own cornbread with a five pound bag of cornmeal, cheaper than Jiffy corn mix.
    Make your own salad dressing by buying the ranch powder mix.
    Some of those box mixes are terrible, like rice a roni.
    What good are hot dog buns without wieners
    Good ideas, Old as Dirt, ones that you and I would opt for but just getting most people, even poor people, to cook anything at all is pretty difficult nowadays. Some have little or no ability to "cook from scratch" like we are able to make our own noodles, brown sugar, mayonnaise, tartar sauce, cocktail sauce, biscuits, pie dough, cornbread etc.
    What are you going to pay for it? I can probably get it for you cheaper, ask me.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    HI
    Posts
    1,877
    There is way too much processed food for me.
    I would definitely be buying 5 lb boxes of frozen chicken instead of hot dogs, bologna,
    Cook chicken in crockpot and make stews, soups, chicken salad, the list is unending,....and then the fat and juices are great for making soups.
    then get can Spam, can be used as soup meat, fried in rice, breakfast meat.
    You need more beans and legumes,
    Split peas with spam, legume and spam, kidney beans for chili.
    Instead of buying a whole chicken at Cosco, buy ground Turkey to make chili, spaghetti, meatloaf, hamburgers, hamburger with Campbell's soup pasta casseroles.etc....
    Buy frozen concentrated fruit juices,
    freeze milk,
    buy more eggs,
    corn beef hash as a treat with fried eggs or bake
    Butter
    Lots of pasta, it's cheap and filling, Rice,can't get a cheaper better filler!
    A couple of cans of Campbell's soups make great casseroles....since it looks like you are not a gourmet cook yet.

    *You need to learn how to cook and improvise now, you will not have process foods if there are emergency situations.

    Get some dried herbs, salt & black, white & red pepper
    Been cooking on a budget my whole life and it's not that hard to stay on budget if you buy food on the outside 3 sides of a store, produce,meat & dairy. All the expensive food is on the inside shells, but you have to do a lot more cooking.

    PS: you can make your own mayo by putting an egg yolk in a cup of oil and whip, lasts three weeks in refrigerator.
    Last edited by Night Owl; 11-02-2013 at 07:30 PM.
    God Bless Us & God Bless America!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Sandhills North Carolina
    Posts
    24,091
    a hundred years ago, people did not sit down to soups, salads, main meals, snacks, deserts, and quarts of special fizzy drinks...... 50 years ago, average people only ate in a restaurant 2 or 3 times a year.

    they had soup six days a week, and a 2 pound chicken on Sundays that fed six or eight people.
    LEFT OVERS got eaten till they were gone.......even if it meant the same meal was served 3 days in a row.

    Large and lavish Variety is not consistent with poor or thrifty meals....

    and that was before any box mixes, or sliced bologna's.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Obama Creek, North Idaho
    Posts
    200
    $200 per person?

    This says Washington $126.69

    http://kff.org/other/state-indicator...tamp-benefits/

    Better sharpen your pencil, and remember, that amount is assuming you are entitled to the full allotment.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Northern Indiana
    Posts
    1,333
    This is a good idea; thanks for posting it.

    That's too much processed food for me, too. We can get 10 lbs of chicken quarters here for $7.50 or so. I'd add some oatmeal and cereal for breakfast and yogurt for snacks. I'd take that $1.50 for the mustard and buy a Hunt's snack pack of pudding for $1.00.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    WI - On the scene, like a sex machine.
    Posts
    24,944
    Good list AF, thanks for sharing!

    Ya, getting people to cook from scratch is going to be a real challenge.

    A lot of it is just plain laziness and a lot of it is the 24/7 commercial bombardment we are subjected to from a very young age and which continues into adulthood.

    Ultimately, cooking real food from scratch is always going to be healthier and cheaper than buying all of the high carb, high salt and high sugar concoctions being foisted upon us.

    My best advice for anbody is to get back to basics. My all time go to source, as a self taught cook, is the -fabulous- 1953 edition of the Better Homes & Gardens New Cook Book.



    Long story short, it has thousands of classic recipies and details everything you need to know about meal planning, preparation, cooking times, weights and measures, storage, expediants and much, much, much more. It is literally a kitchen home economics course crammed into one handy to use book.

    Happy Eating!
    "The most intriguing point for the historian is that where history and legend meet."

    "None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who think they are free."

    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

  10. #10
    I have been in times where I had this much to feed a family of 5 for a month, and I found my brain locked up in panic.
    I think your list is a great start! Of course people will adjust accordingly, but it's very helpful!

    I like that for the most part, this list assumes you have nothing already at home (mustard, etc...) so it would be less if they have those items.

    Prices are a bit different-- at aldi's here 10# bag of potatoes today was 3.50, but have seen them on specials as low as 99 cents once in a while.
    and today I bought salt-- big container-- for 47 cents. (most people have that at home anyway though)

    With flour, sugar, oil, eggs-- people can do pancakes, cakes, cookies, etc...much cheaper than store bought or kit.

    One thing I have noticed lately-- I used to be able to buy 1 box of the box-flavored noodle things and it would feed my family as a side dish. Now, I need 2-3 boxes to get the same amount of "food" as a side dish. I KNOW this for a fact, because I always use the same serving bowl. They keep decreasing the amount of food inside those boxes. As a result, I *MIGHT* recommend people start finding simple recipes to make that would be the pasta dish-- either main or as a side. A bag of noodles can be as low as 49 cents on sale, or 1.00 regular price. With that bag, you can make ALOT of pasta! And there's a huge variety of what you can make (cheaply) to go as a sauce.

    Just my thoughts. Good job!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,079
    Your whole list is a mix of "can they cook or not?" items. Example: Koolaid and unflavored gelatin--really?? If they are cooking types, fine. If they are Rice-a-roni/lipton noodle types there is no way! Generic Jello, dollar store here is often 2/$1 or even 3/$1, so that's cheaper or a wash.

    Same with the boxes of ultra-milk. Either they buy a couple gallons (cost here would be $3 a gallon, loss leader the last few weeks at Dillons/Kroger $1.99 gallon) or they can buy and freeze it if they get it all at once. The package eaters aren't going to look for shelf-stable milk.

    I feed a family of 4 on about $400 a month including paper goods and misc., sometimes it's 6 people if all the kids are home. I dip into prep type stuff regularly, rotating and replacing as needed/sales/extra funds. So it can be done. Of course it helps if you've been doing it as long as I have so that I work with sale cycles--last month was canned veggie stock-up at $.39 each. Limit 12 per visit, two day sale, so I made 7 "visits" (bring out groceries, go back in to different register, etc.). Another week was canned beans 5/$2. I knew October was canned goods month, so I was prepared and had $50 saved toward the yearly stock-up.

    My 20-something daughters can all get by on $200 a month for groceries, and they like to eat! But they also scratch cook and feed friends/roomies frequently with that. I help with "Christmas bags" of staple items including spices, bouillon, sauces, and items tailored to each girl like teas for one, coffee for another, cider mixes for the third. Plus they each get a bag of sugar, flour, box of cornmeal, a couple cake mixes, whatever I have a lot of or got a killer sale on. Last year it was a couple bottles each of Bacon pieces I got for $.25 each from clearance--the labels had fallen off, but it was pretty obvious what they were and exp. dates were printed on the bottle 2 years away.

    It can be tough getting into the rotation of sales and buying in an "unbalanced" fashion, and it can be even rougher if family or roommates are of the buy it-eat it-cupboard's empty-buy more type. Eldest daughter now keeps her extra food and pantry stock in her bedroom and in tubs underneath old clothes in her bedroom and the storage closet since her roommate threw such a fit about all that food in the pantry! (roommate from London) DD#2 keeps hers under the bed which has risers--AZ roomie accused her of hoarding. DD#3 managed to semi-convert her long-time friend and roomie enough that after they both moved home the other Mom has commented favorably to me on the change in grocery store behavior in her daughter. But all my girls have been raised such that a poorly stocked pantry nearly sends them into panic attacks.

    Since I live in what is considered a "high cost of living" midwest city, I'll see about making up a month list for the $200.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    AL
    Posts
    24,713
    Quote Originally Posted by NBCsurvivor View Post
    Miracle Whip??????

    FREAK!!!!!


    No kidding.

    Mayo only, no salad dressing and it has to be Hellman's/Best Foods or nothing.

    Oh, and add 50% to that price list and it might cover it here, but I doubt it.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Kaydee View Post
    Since I live in what is considered a "high cost of living" midwest city, I'll see about making up a month list for the $200.
    Yes, Please do!

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    SENM
    Posts
    1,837
    I think your list is entirely believable. Especially the Miracle Whip! I though you were going to leave it out and breathed a sigh of relief when I saw it. The ONLY sandwich spread for moi.

    Re cooking from scratch: If ya'll are anything like me, it's either crock pot till ya die or some kinds of "started" dinners, like the chili not-from-scratch with Jiffy cornbread, several varieties of sandwiches (and I definitely do NOT have time to bake my own bread!), a bit of comfort food like ice cream, pork and beans (again, don't have time to soak overnight, put in crockpot for 6 hours, seasoning after 4 hours....I work 9 hour days), pasta and sauce in 20 minutes or so, alfredo for some creamy goodness, and on and on and on.

    Compare this list to what ya'll see next time you're grocery shopping and see someone with SNAP or EBT in front of you. I'd bet there'll be some major differences!

    Kajun
    Stupid outta hurt immediately!

  15. #15
    OMG, $200! I remember fondly the days when I had a little extra money and could spend $200 a month on groceries. Now I spend half that, which includes pet food.

    Of course I do have all the fruits and vegetables that I can eat. Along with my own eggs. Once I get the cow butcherd this winter, I will be able to spend even less. (Or probably the same the way prices are going.)

    I've budgeted $10 for tomorrows shopping trip. With clearance and sale items, I'll leave with a bag full of food. It all depends on how well one shops. Basically, I'm going for the $3.99 - 2 pound block of cheese that is in the ad. And know that on Sundays they clearance certain items and hope to pick up a few things.

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by naturallysweet View Post
    I've budgeted $10 for tomorrows shopping trip. With clearance and sale items, I'll leave with a bag full of food. It all depends on how well one shops. Basically, I'm going for the $3.99 - 2 pound block of cheese that is in the ad. And know that on Sundays they clearance certain items and hope to pick up a few things.
    Impressive!

    And, I'm totally jealous about the 2 pound block of cheese. What store is that at? The way my boys go through cheese... lol

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by NC Susan View Post
    a hundred years ago, people did not sit down to soups, salads, main meals, snacks, deserts, and quarts of special fizzy drinks...... 50 years ago, average people only ate in a restaurant 2 or 3 times a year.

    they had soup six days a week, and a 2 pound chicken on Sundays that fed six or eight people.
    LEFT OVERS got eaten till they were gone.......even if it meant the same meal was served 3 days in a row.

    Large and lavish Variety is not consistent with poor or thrifty meals....

    and that was before any box mixes, or sliced bologna's.
    For sure. DH's grandmother only did a chicken on Sundays (very fresh, BTW, killed right before being fried). When I was growing up, we only had beef or other roast on Sunday-the rest of the week was soup, tuna casserole (excuse me, tuna hot dish), hamburger hot dish (not burgers), creamed tuna on toast, sandwiches (we ate lots of luncheon meat), hot cereal in winter, cold in summer, eggs were usually for supper.

    Food was a much higher percent of income than it's been for the last couple decades, but that is changing.

    Holidays were indeed special back then because we had food we almost never had otherwise.

    My parents rarely went to restaurants--usually for Mother's Day or a birthday. No fast food restaurants where we lived except a McD's sometime in the 60's.
    Last edited by kittyknits; 11-02-2013 at 09:44 PM.

  18. #18
    I bought 10 pie pumpkins and 8 butternut squash for 1.25 each today. A peck of beautiful onions for 6.50 and a peck of red yams for 8. I feel as though I really made a score. We're having pumpkin bread and pumpkin pie in our lunches and for desert this week. There'll be a whole lot more in the freezer next weekend. Oh, I also bought a big old kraut cabbage for 1.50.
    If you need something, ask God. If you don't, thank Him.

  19. #19
    That reminds me. I bake huge butternut squashes and lots of sweet potatoes in the fall (buy on sale).

    They freeze beautifully and we have them all winter. The pre-chopped ones in some stores are sprayed to continue to look fresh until they are purchased.

  20. #20
    ainitfunny,

    i priced out what your list was in my area, and the prices here wouldhave blown that list out of the water LOL. groceries are expensive here.

    i made up a list for people that are gluten free, assuming they have nothing in the house, but they can cook (at least on a basic level). i hope this helps. i was 4 cents over though (sorry) all items were generic when applicable




    1 whole chicken = 6.00
    6 lbs hamburger = 20.00
    3 lb beef roast = 15.00 (some sliced for sammiches)
    4 doz eggs = 8.00
    mccanns quick oatmeal = 10.00 (it is gluten free)
    4 lbs cheese = 20.00
    2 lbs dry lentils = 4.00
    2 lbs iodized salt = 1.00
    4 oz black pepper = 3.50
    3 lbs onions = 3.00
    ---------------------------
    90.50

    2 bundles of celery = 4.00
    2 gal milk = 8.00
    1 lb butter = 3.50
    1 lb garlic = 2.80
    10 lbs potatoes = 5.00
    1 bottle ketchup = 1.90
    1 bottle mustard = 1.80
    2 oz ceyenne pepper =2.50
    5 oz chili powder = 5.00
    5 lbs carrots = 4.00
    2 lb bag frozen mixed veggies = 3.70
    3 cans of beans = 3.00
    2 lbs rice = 2.00
    2 lbs brocolli = 4.00
    1 cabbage = 2.00
    3 cans tomatoes = 3.00
    2 green peppers = 2.00
    4 lb bag of sugar = 3.00
    ---------------------------------

    151.70

    5 lb bag of corn tortillas = 6.00
    1 jar peanut butter = 3.00
    2 oz cinnamon = 3.50
    48 oz jar applesauce = 3.00
    -----------------------------

    167.20

    4 lbs oranges = 6.00
    15 oz bottle lemon juice = 2.40
    2 lbs gluten free pasta = 4.00
    2 jars pasta sauce = 4.00
    2 lb bag of popcorn = 2.40
    1 can coffee = 8.00
    1 17 oz bottle olive oil = 6.04
    ----------------------------------------


    total = 200.04


    this is pretty heavy in meat, and it can easily be cut down to allow for more veggies or beans or other things
    float like a butterfly...

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Klamath County, Oregon
    Posts
    7,174
    I can't speak for how other people cook, my list has to be for how *I* cook! I'm going to town on Monday, and will be doing most of the grocery shopping for a month. I'll check prices while I'm there and see if I can generate a more accurate list. However, I do have a lot of staples on hand. I spent about $300 on beef last month, and will spend another hundred dollars on chicken this month. That is in addition to the goat I butchered and the chickens I'm going to butcher (a few culls from the laying flock), and is more than enough meat for DD and me for a year. Last month also, I spent about forty dollars on cabbage, carrots, onions, celery, parsley, and garlic, and made enough live-culture sauerkraut to last at least several months. So I don't shop for one month at a time. I buy a big bag (25 lbs.) of oatmeal, and it will last us a year. Ditto brown rice. 50 lbs. of lentils and another 25 lbs. of pinto beans, again, a year's worth. That's including frequently feeding friends and taking stuff to church potlucks. I've got salad and stir-fry greens growing in the living room, and am going to add another container -- should give the two of us fresh green stuff all winter, and that's including the grazing that my neighbor/friend's kids do when they visit. (They like veggies, and are well-behaved good kids; I'm blessed to have them living nearby. Plus the older ones know how to milk goats, and have already done chores for me a couple of times when I had to go somewhere!)

    Anyway, MY list for a month's worth of food for the two of us would include (some prices are from my last trip to the store a week ago, some are guestimates until my next trip; also I'm not including my homegrown eggs and milk because I'm buying animal feed, and you can't get that with food stamps. Also, I'm assuming starting with salt and pepper at home!):

    ten pound bag of frozen chicken quarters, $9.99
    flat of five dozen eggs X 2 (we eat a lot of eggs) $7.88 x 2 = $15.76
    four gallons whole milk X 2.99 = $11.96 (most of the milk would be turned into kefir)
    sixty apples, usually large Granny Smiths, which average $0.50 each, so $30 (might seem expensive, but we each eat an apple every day -- sometimes they are less than $0.99/lb., but not often)
    2 lbs. sugar (we use stevia, but too expensive for this list) est. $1.49
    large box of tea bags $4.39
    5 lbs. carrots $2.49
    8 large yellow onions @ $0.49/lb = approx. $2.40
    5 lbs. shredded cheddar cheese $10.98 (that was on sale, usually it's around $15)
    four heads romaine lettuce @ $1.29 each = $5.16

    16 oz. olive oil about $4
    apple cider vinegar 16 oz. (real, not fake) est. $2.50
    one head green cabbage est. $2.00
    celery $2.50
    25 lbs. potatoes $15.00 (might get 50 lbs. for this price at this time of year, as potatoes are grown here commercially)
    2 red sweet peppers $1.58
    16oz. parmesan cheese est. $6.00
    large bottle imitation vanilla $6.89
    Cocoa powder $2.98
    cornstarch (make your own pudding!) $1.49


    25 lbs. long-grain brown rice $27.00 (this price and the next two are off the bags I recently bought)
    25 lbs. lentils $26.00
    25 lbs. old-fashioned rolled oats $18.00
    2 lbs. brown rice flour (we both have celiac disease and have to eat gluten-free) about $6.00 (much cheaper to grind your own if you have a grain mill)
    4 lbs. raisins $8.98
    cinnamon est. $6.00
    pancake syrup est. $3.00
    baking powder est. $2.50
    BBQ sauce $1.89
    powdered chicken bouillon est. $4.00


    4 lbs. butter @ 2.59/lb. = 10.36
    4 bunches fresh kale $6.00
    bag of garlic $3.00 est.
    2 lbs. brown sugar est. $1.99
    4 cans pickled beets $3.20
    2 cans green beans $1.60
    2 packages of frozen spinach $3.00
    2 pkgs. gluten-free pasta $7.00
    1 lb. raw almonds (from bulk bins) $5.59
    lg. peanut butter $4.48


    1 lb. honey $6.00
    1 gf cake mix $4.00
    5 lbs. hamburger (repackage into ten bags) $15.00
    4 cans tomato sauce $3.20
    Italian seasoning est. $5.00
    1 sweet potato about $1.00

    Total: Est. $314.96 for two people.

    This is actually more than we usually spend. For instance, the large bags of staples would last several months, as would things like the spices, sugar, honey, and pancake syrup. Of course, with animals to feed (dogs and cats as well as dairy goats, chickens, and meat rabbits) I usually spend more on a shopping trip than this, but food stamps doesn't cover any of that stuff (just for the record, we aren't getting food stamps). They don't cover some things most people consider necessities, either, like TP, toothpaste, and shampoo, dish detergent, laundry soap, and so on.

    Kathleen

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Purdy area, Western WA
    Posts
    22,898
    Quote Originally Posted by hunybee View Post
    ainitfunny,

    i priced out what your list was in my area, and the prices here wouldhave blown that list out of the water LOL. groceries are expensive here.

    i made up a list for people that are gluten free, assuming they have nothing in the house, but they can cook (at least on a basic level). i hope this helps. i was 4 cents over though (sorry) all items were generic when applicable




    1 whole chicken = 6.00
    6 lbs hamburger = 20.00
    3 lb beef roast = 15.00 (some sliced for sammiches)
    4 doz eggs = 8.00
    mccanns quick oatmeal = 10.00 (it is gluten free)
    4 lbs cheese = 20.00
    2 lbs dry lentils = 4.00
    2 lbs iodized salt = 1.00
    4 oz black pepper = 3.50
    3 lbs onions = 3.00
    ---------------------------
    90.50

    2 bundles of celery = 4.00
    2 gal milk = 8.00
    1 lb butter = 3.50
    1 lb garlic = 2.80
    10 lbs potatoes = 5.00
    1 bottle ketchup = 1.90
    1 bottle mustard = 1.80
    2 oz ceyenne pepper =2.50
    5 oz chili powder = 5.00
    5 lbs carrots = 4.00
    2 lb bag frozen mixed veggies = 3.70
    3 cans of beans = 3.00
    2 lbs rice = 2.00
    2 lbs brocolli = 4.00
    1 cabbage = 2.00
    3 cans tomatoes = 3.00
    2 green peppers = 2.00
    4 lb bag of sugar = 3.00
    ---------------------------------

    151.70

    5 lb bag of corn tortillas = 6.00
    1 jar peanut butter = 3.00
    2 oz cinnamon = 3.50
    48 oz jar applesauce = 3.00
    -----------------------------

    167.20

    4 lbs oranges = 6.00
    15 oz bottle lemon juice = 2.40
    2 lbs gluten free pasta = 4.00
    2 jars pasta sauce = 4.00
    2 lb bag of popcorn = 2.40
    1 can coffee = 8.00
    1 17 oz bottle olive oil = 6.04
    ----------------------------------------


    total = 200.04


    this is pretty heavy in meat, and it can easily be cut down to allow for more veggies or beans or other things
    That does seem like a lot of meat for one person, I'd probably add a bag of potatoes, sweet potatoes, more rice, bread, flour and sacrifice somewhere else. Low carb is one thing but most people are not benefited by "gluten free" unless they are truly sensitive, like people with nut allergies.

    "Gluten free" is not a "healthier" way of eating IMO, it is just a way to sell the public on the less nutritious (lower protein than before) GM and hybridized grains and wheat grown nowadays to manufacture consumer approval, because gluten is the protein in grains. Grains USED to have more protein than they do today and people once lived on an almost exclusive grain diet with little supplemental protein, can't do that today.

    Where do you live/shop? The food prices you have to deal with ARE daunting. Have you checked other supermarkets? I do know prices HERE in some upscale yuppie supermarkets for some items can be DOUBLE what they are in my Fred Meyer grocery.

    I actually do THIS \l/, what KAYDEE does:
    KAYDEE SAID:
    I dip into prep type stuff regularly, rotating and replacing as needed/sales/extra funds. So it can be done. Of course it helps if you've been doing it as long as I have so that I work with sale cycles--last month was canned veggie stock-up at $.39 each. Limit 12 per visit, two day sale, so I made 7 "visits" (bring out groceries, go back in to different register, etc.). Another week was canned beans 5/$2. I knew October was canned goods month, so I was prepared and had $50 saved toward the yearly stock-up.
    I help with "Christmas bags" of staple items including spices, bouillon, sauces, and items tailored to each girl like teas for one, coffee for another, cider mixes for the third. Plus they each get a bag of sugar, flour, box of cornmeal, a couple cake mixes, whatever I have a lot of or got a killer sale on. Last year it was a couple bottles each of Bacon pieces I got for $.25 each from clearance--the labels had fallen off, but it was pretty obvious what they were and exp. dates were printed on the bottle 2 years away.

    It can be tough getting into the rotation of sales and buying in an "unbalanced" fashion, and it can be even rougher if family or roommates are of the buy it-eat it-cupboard's empty-buy more type.
    I can coast through "coffee, beef, cocoa, whatever shortage/high price" till the price goes down again cause I'm stocked up. I can wait till they have chicken, pork, bacon, cheese or other overpriced stuff go on sale since I have extra and just buy the sales.

    By the way NEVER LET STUFF "GO BAD" if you aren't eating that celery, parsley, or green pepper or red pepper fast enough CHOP IT (freeze bananas whole with peel) AND BAG IT AND FREEZE IT.
    What are you going to pay for it? I can probably get it for you cheaper, ask me.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Purdy area, Western WA
    Posts
    22,898

    3

    If you live alone, you are stuck buying a "personal watermelon" or you can do this:
    Freezing Watermelon (cantaloupe, muskmelon, honedew melons too)

    Watermelon can be frozen to use later as a treat or in recipes, such as beverages and desserts. There are several methods for freezing so you can continue to enjoy watermelon well after the season has ended.
    Prepare the watermelon for freezing

    First wash your hands, then wash the watermelon in running water, using a clean brush to remove any dirt. Pat dry with paper towels. Cut the watermelon in half, lengthwise, then cut the melon into slices, wedges, cubes or balls, removing the rind and any seeds.
    Unsweetened dry pack method

    The simplest and fastest method for freezing melons is to spread the pieces in a single layer on a cookie sheet and freeze until firm. Once firm, transfer the pieces to containers or plastic freezer bags. Seal, label and freeze leaving a 1/2 inch of headspace for expansion during freezing.
    Sweetened dry pack method

    Add 1 pound of granulated sugar to each 5 pounds of fruit; mix well. Pack in suitable containers. Seal, label and freeze, leaving a 1/2 inch of headspace for expansion during freezing.
    Syrup pack method

    The syrup pack method is useful if you plan to serve the watermelon in desserts or fruit cocktail. This method preserves the melon's flavor and texture the best. Use a light syrup (9 cups of water or fruit juice to 2 1/4 cups sugar). Combine the sugar and water in a saucepan and bring to a boil until the sugar is completely dissolved. Chill. Pour 1/2 cup of syrup into the freezer container and add melon. If necessary, add more syrup until melon is completely covered and place a small piece of water-resistant paper on top to keep them submerged. Leave a 1/2 inch of headspace for pints, 1 inch for quarts for expansion during freezing.
    Juice pack method

    Pack fruit in suitable packaging containers. Pour in pineapple juice, orange juice or ginger ale, completely covering the melon and place a small piece of water-resistant paper on top to keep the mellon submerged. Seal, label and freeze leaving a 1/2 inch of headspace for pints, 1 inch for quarts for expansion during freezing.
    Use suitable packaging containers

    Freezer containers should be moisture and vapor resistant and should not be prone to cracking or breaking at low temperatures. Containers should provide protection against absorbing flavors or odors and should be easy to label. The best packaging for freezing watermelons includes freezer-grade plastic bags, rigid plastic containers or glass containers or heavy-duty foil containers.
    Storage duration

    Watermelon can be frozen for 8 to 12 months at 0F (-18C).
    Thawing frozen watermelon, using and storing thawed watermelon

    Remove the watermelon from the freezer and thaw in the refrigerator. Add to dishes or consume with a few ice crystals still remaining. Use within four days.
    You can also PUREE FRESH FRUIT and freeze it for a frozen treat.
    GRAPES ALSO freeze well and make a great frozen snack or ice cube in drinks!!
    Last edited by ainitfunny; 11-02-2013 at 11:20 PM.
    What are you going to pay for it? I can probably get it for you cheaper, ask me.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,711
    I was thinking about beans and cheese. Cheese is reliably about $4/lb at Costco. Haven't bought beans in a long time; still working on my 50 lb sacks bought a while ago.

  25. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by ainitfunny View Post
    That does seem like a lot of meat for one person, I'd probably add a bag of potatoes, sweet potatoes, more rice, bread, flour and sacrifice somewhere else. Low carb is one thing but most people are not benefited by "gluten free" unless they are truly sensitive, like people with nut allergies.

    "Gluten free" is not a "healthier" way of eating IMO, it is just a way to sell the public on the less nutritious (lower protein than before) GM and hybridized grains and wheat grown nowadays to manufacture consumer approval, because gluten is the protein in grains. Grains USED to have more protein than they do today and people once lived on an almost exclusive grain diet with little supplemental protein, can't do that today.

    Where do you live/shop? The food prices you have to deal with ARE daunting. Have you checked other supermarkets? I do know prices HERE in some upscale yuppie supermarkets for some items can be DOUBLE what they are in my Fred Meyer grocery.

    I actually do THIS \l/, what KAYDEE does:

    I can coast through "coffee, beef, cocoa, whatever shortage/high price" till the price goes down again cause I'm stocked up. I can wait till they have chicken, pork, bacon, cheese or other overpriced stuff go on sale since I have extra and just buy the sales.

    By the way NEVER LET STUFF "GO BAD" if you aren't eating that celery, parsley, or green pepper or red pepper fast enough CHOP IT (freeze bananas whole with peel) AND BAG IT AND FREEZE IT.


    actually, we truly do have a problem with gluten and many other food allergies, so for people that must be gluten free, they can't add breads, flour, or regular pastas and gluten containing items that normally one would add in to make the food and money stretch. i made it meat heavy because that seems to be the biggest complaint from people all the time with budgeting for food, but i have done with les meat for 5 people. i would also have put in sweet potatoes (i did have potatoes in the list already), beans, and probably millet as that is high in protein, and a few other things, but most people don't know what to do with those things, and it would have gone past the basic cooking level at that point.

    i live in minnesota in a little tiny town. there are no upscale yuppie supermarkets here LOL. it is country people here. there is a walmart about 20 miles away, but the grocery store in town here is it. they actually have very decent prices compared to the big grocery stores an hour away, and the quality is better too. groceries are just expensive up here.
    float like a butterfly...

  26. #26
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Smack dab in the middle
    Posts
    4,233
    The two of us average just under $200/mo. for food, but we cook from scratch in almost all cases. We purchase specials and can/freeze/dehydrate when it makes $en$e to do so. It can be done.

    2nd Peter 1:19 - We have also a more sure word of prophecy; whereunto ye do well that ye take heed, as unto a light that shineth in a dark place, until the day dawn, and the day star arise in your hearts

  27. #27
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    AL
    Posts
    24,713
    No matter what the prices, I have to remember to allow for the 8-9% sales tax we have to pay on all food. (tax varies by county)

  28. #28
    ainitrunny I helped my kid make out a monthly food budget that included make ahead meals to cook on days off of work. This is what we came up with. (I updated the prices to reflect current prices available here). Some things like spices are long term purchases and other things like butter or ketchup would carry over. 1 person can eat well and without much fuss for a month on around $100.00. Now my kid isn't much of a breakfast eater and instead eats breakfast closer to lunch time so we only planned on 2 meals and a snack per day. The first month is the most expensive because you start with nothing.

    1 4 lb package of ground beef $11.00 each
    1 package of 5 chicken breasts or thighs $3.99
    1 1lb package elbow noodles $1.00
    1 can/jar red sauce $1,49
    1 dozen eggs $2.49
    1 jar peanut butter $2.50
    1 package shredded cheese $2.50
    1 jar salsa $2.99
    1 package 12 burrito shells $2.49
    4 1lb bags of frozen vegetables corn, green beans, cauliflower carrots $0.99 each
    1 3lb bag onions $2.99
    1 5lb bag potatoes $3.99
    1 container of oatmeal $2.49
    1 green pepper $0.99
    1 can of coffee $6.99
    1 box of tea bags $3.99
    1 can of mushrooms $0.49
    2 packages of loaf bread $3.99 each
    1 large container chicken broth $2.99
    1 box shells or small size pasta $1.00
    1 box kraft mac n cheese $1.49
    2 can diced tomatoes $0.79 each
    1 bulk bag apples/oranges $5.99
    1 bag of corn chips $3.49
    1 frozen pizza $5.99
    1 can red beans $0.79
    1 quart milk $0.99
    4 boxes jello 3 for $1.00
    1 1lb package italian sausage links $2.89
    1 package of ketchup $1.49
    1 1lb package of butter $1.99
    1 package of bread crumbs $2.99
    1 container of ground pepper $0.99
    1 container onion powder $0.99
    1 container garlic powder $0.99
    1 container cumin $0.99
    1 bag of popcorn $2.79
    1 bottle of vegetable oil $3.99
    1 4lb bag of sugar $2.49
    1 container chili powder $0.99
    1 box corn starch $1.99
    1 container salt $0.79
    Last edited by lassiesma; 11-03-2013 at 12:33 AM.

  29. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by ainitfunny View Post
    If you live alone, you are stuck buying a "personal watermelon" or you can do this:


    You can also PUREE FRESH FRUIT and freeze it for a frozen treat.
    GRAPES ALSO freeze well and make a great frozen snack or ice cube in drinks!!
    How do you freeze grapes? I would love to do this (especially with the news about Chile). So, just drop them in freezer bags? Do they break down and get mushy? I suppose that wouldn't matter for blending.

    Re: freezing bananas. Since they freeze really hard, I peel first and divide each one into quarters. That way I don't have to slice them when they are rock-hard.

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Purdy area, Western WA
    Posts
    22,898
    Quote Originally Posted by kittyknits View Post
    How do you freeze grapes? I would love to do this (especially with the news about Chile). So, just drop them in freezer bags? Do they break down and get mushy? I suppose that wouldn't matter for blending.

    Re: freezing bananas. Since they freeze really hard, I peel first and divide each one into quarters. That way I don't have to slice them when they are rock-hard.
    That sounds like a good idea about bananas, I have to try it!
    THIS WEB PAGE HAS SEVERAL PEOPLE giving their tips on freezing grapes:
    http://www.thriftyfun.com/tf62498768.tip.html

    BTW- It definitely appears to me that people on food stamps are not trying as hard as people NOT on food stamps to make the food stamp dollar last the month. I GUESS PAYING FOR YOUR OWN FOOD IS A GREAT INCENTIVE TO GETTING THE MOST FOR YOUR MONEY IF they have to run to the food bank the last week of the month while millions of others, NOT ON FOOD STAMPS, are still eating food that they paid for themselves with LESS MONEY THAN THE "free eats crowds" claims is "not enough".

    I always wondered WHY people who wanted "free food" free clothes, free housing, always seemed to have such HIGH STANDARDS about what they would "accept", while the rest of us "make do" with the best we can buy with what we pay for. I guess that is why, when my family said "I refuse to live in this slum housing, bad neighborhood, wear second hand clothes, and live in the inner city"...I told them, "we both lost our JOBS, had to move before we lost the nice house, WHO DO YOU THINK SHOULD live here?" If that is all you can afford, then swallow your pride and live there, wear the second hand clothes, eat the cheapest generic, day old, frozen expired/out of date food and work like hell to get out as fast as possible. They (we) did and got out relatively fast and back to lower middle class lifestyle.
    Last edited by ainitfunny; 11-03-2013 at 12:08 AM.
    What are you going to pay for it? I can probably get it for you cheaper, ask me.

  31. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by ainitfunny View Post
    That sounds like a good idea about bananas, I have to try it!
    THIS WEB PAGE HAS SEVERAL PEOPLE giving their tips on freezing grapes:
    http://www.thriftyfun.com/tf62498768.tip.html
    Thanks. The info on that site answered my questions. Now I need to make another trip to Costco to buy more grapes.

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Commiefornia
    Posts
    883
    Quote Originally Posted by NBCsurvivor View Post
    Miracle Whip??????

    FREAK!!!!!


    Hehe..I agree...Mayo is also cheaper..lol

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Purdy area, Western WA
    Posts
    22,898
    Quote Originally Posted by subnet View Post
    Hehe..I agree...Mayo is also cheaper..lol
    Actually, I use them interchangeably. Cant really notice the difference and usually buy the cheapest, generic anyway.
    What are you going to pay for it? I can probably get it for you cheaper, ask me.

  34. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by NBCsurvivor View Post
    Miracle Whip??????

    FREAK!!!!!


    Pfft. Mayo is nasty. In my house it is Miracle Whip or greek yoghurt.

  35. #35
    Yikes.........there's no way we could eat for $200 a month...........guess prices in NW of Denver must be kinda high compared with many of you.........$50 bucks a week might buy super basics but I have to buy everything...there's no farmers market or Aldi's near me...........and due to the horrible additives I'm trying to buy healthier foods.........prevention instead of cure.......

    I know this was meant to show how people can make it if they have to...............praise God we don't have to eat generic yet.........yes, I'm choosy......no offense meant to anyone..........
    Sapphire

    myopically challenged

  36. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Purdy area, Western WA
    Posts
    22,898
    Quote Originally Posted by SAPPHIRE View Post
    Yikes.........there's no way we could eat for $200 a month...........guess prices in NW of Denver must be kinda high compared with many of you.........$50 bucks a week might buy super basics but I have to buy everything...there's no farmers market or Aldi's near me...........and due to the horrible additives I'm trying to buy healthier foods.........prevention instead of cure.......

    I know this was meant to show how people can make it if they have to...............praise God we don't have to eat generic yet.........yes, I'm choosy......no offense meant to anyone..........
    HOW MANY ARE THE "WE" you spoke of?
    Those not working at all get more(maximum entitlement) than those working poor (which seems backwards) and $200(now $186) is what ONE person gets.
    If there are TWO of you it would be trying to "make do" on $367(NOW$347) a month, if you have no other income.
    If there are THREE of you it would be $526(now $497mo) free food per month to "make do".

    From what the working public is told, I expected these people to be forced by want and food stamps to eating oatmeal every morning, RAMEN soup or peanut butter sandwiches for lunch, and a $.50 frozen pot pie or $1 value meal fast food hamburger for supper. Turns out it is students and low income working or elderly people who are eating like that and the no income non-working are eating pretty high on the hog. That is from OBSERVED, first hand witnesses watching what food stamps are paying for in shopping carts.
    Household Size--------Oct. 1, 2013 --------Nov. 1, 2013---------Difference

    1-------------------------- $200 ------------------$189 ------------- -$11

    2---------------------------$367-------------------$347------------- -$20

    3---------------------------$526-------------------$497------------- -$29

    4---------------------------$668-------------------$632------------- -$36

    5---------------------------$793-------------------$750------------- -$43

    6---------------------------$952-------------------$900------------- -$52

    7 $1,052 $995 -$57

    8 $1,202 $1,137 -$65
    Last edited by ainitfunny; 11-03-2013 at 01:22 AM.
    What are you going to pay for it? I can probably get it for you cheaper, ask me.

  37. #37
    Most store brands are really the same as national brands. Grown, picked and processed in the same plant and then labeled for whichever store. Same with most generic items. My ds absolutely lives and breathes brand names. I know a lot of people who are that way. Its their money to blow as they choose.

    My grocery budget for 2 people (1 diabetic) is $200 a month and we manage quite nicely. Since I've built up a pantry I virtually never buy anything unless its on sale or at Aldis. My grocery list is usually meat, eggs, fresh fruit and veggies, milk, yogurt, butter or margarine and then replacement of pantry items used or store specials to be added to the pantry.

    For 2 people the Jiffy cornbread mix is a better economy as scratch recipies are too large for 2 people. Cornbread does not freeze well.

  38. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Southern Arizona
    Posts
    1,365
    Quote Originally Posted by Lilbitsnana View Post
    No matter what the prices, I have to remember to allow for the 8-9% sales tax we have to pay on all food. (tax varies by county)

    People who use SNAP don't pay tax on food.
    "Never let a dog watch your food or the government watch your money."
    Barry M. Goldwater, Jr

  39. #39
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    AL
    Posts
    24,713
    Quote Originally Posted by peekaboo View Post
    People who use SNAP don't pay tax on food.
    I know, but I have to, and that is the rate in the county I live in and surrounding counties.

  40. #40
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    HI
    Posts
    1,877
    I can live on $200/month and we have to have everything shipped by barge or air cargo plane, no large groceries, no Cosco here, prices are higher here for food than anywhere on the mainland, except maybe Alaska. I can be done, but you have to cook...create, try to add flavors you like to dishes.
    God Bless Us & God Bless America!

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