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CRIME CDC Director Arrested for Child Molestation and Bestiality
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  1. #1
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    CDC Director Arrested for Child Molestation and Bestiality

    http://mynaturesmedicine.com/2013/09...nd-bestiality/

    September 19, 2013 by admin2


    Dr. Kimberly Quinlan Lindsey, a top official with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been arrested and charged with two counts of child molestation and one count of bestiality.

    Dr. Lindsey, who joined the CDC in 1999, is currently the deputy director for the Laboratory Science Policy and Practice Program Office. She’s second in command of the program office.

    Prior to that role, she was the senior health scientist in the Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, an office that oversees the allocation process for $1.5 billion in terrorism preparedness.

    According to CNN:

    Dr. Kimberly Quinlan Lindsey has been with the Centers for Disease Control for 12 years.



    Atlanta (CNN) – An official with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has been arrested and charged with two counts of child molestation and one count of bestiality, police said.

    Police arrested Dr. Kimberly Quinlan Lindsey, 44, in DeKalb County, Georgia, on Sunday.

    Authorities also charged Lindsey’s live-in boyfriend, Thomas Joseph Westerman, 42, with two counts of child molestation.

    The two are accused of “immoral and indecent” sexual acts involving a 6-year-old, according to information from DeKalb County Magistrate Court and an arrest warrant.

    The bestiality charge says Lindsey “did unlawfully perform or submit to any sexual act with an animal.”

    The alleged incidents took place between January 1, 2010, and August 22, 2011.

    Westerman is out of jail on bail; Lindsey remains in jail with bail set at $20,000, said Lt. Pam Kunz of the DeKalb County

    Neither has made a public statement. Westerman did not immediately return a call from CNN.

    Both went to court on Sunday for an initial appearance and have a preliminary hearing scheduled for December 1, said Reggie Silverman, deputy clerk with DeKalb Magistrate Court.

    Lindsey is the deputy director for the Laboratory Science Policy and Practice Program Office at the CDC, according to her biography on the agency’s website.

    Prior to her current role, Lindsey was the senior health scientist in the Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response. That office oversees the allocation process for $1.5 billion in terrorism preparedness.

    In her 12 years at the CDC, Lindsey has received 12 awards for outstanding performance on projects and programs, according to her bio on Emory University’s Biological and Biomedical Sciences website. Lindsey earned her doctorate in immunology and molecular pathogenesis from the university in 1998, a year before she began work at the CDC.

    A LinkedIn Web page for a Thomas Westerman lists him as having been a watch officer at the CDC from November 2009 to November 2010 and a resource management specialist since August 2011.

    CDC spokesman Tom Skinner said the agency is aware of the case but cannot comment on personnel issues.



    Dr. Lindsey Played Primary Role in Bogus Swine Flu Propaganda Campaign

    As you may recall, the 2009 H1N1 swine flu pandemic turned out to be a complete sham, with a fast-tracked and particularly dangerous vaccine being pushed as the sole remedy. Children and pregnant women were the primary targets of this dangerous vaccine. The H1N1 flu was a perfect example of how the CDC can brazenly distort reality, and often ignore and deny the dangerous and life-threatening side effects of their solution. As a result of this bogus propaganda campaign, thousands of people were harmed (and many died) worldwide.

    In August, it was revealed that the 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine increased the risk for narcolepsy—a very rare and devastating sleeping disorder—in Swedish children and adolescents by 660 percent.

    Finland also noticed a dramatic increase in narcolepsy following vaccination with Pandemrix. There, an interim report issued in January of this year found that the H1N1 vaccine increased the risk of narcolepsy by 900 percent in children and adolescents below the age of 19. In the US, the H1N1 flu vaccine was statistically linked with abnormally high rates of miscarriage and stillbirths. As reported by Steven Rubin on the NVIC’s blog, the US H1N1 flu vaccine was SIXTY timesmore likely to be reported to VAERS to be associated with miscarriage than previous seasonal flu vaccines.

    The only “winners” in this game were the pharmaceutical companies that received millions of dollars for this never-proven-effective and highly reactive vaccine, while being sheltered by our government from liability for any harm it caused.

    Dr. Lindsey played an important role in that campaign, which ended in tragedy for countless many—not from a killer flu (statistically, the 2009 H1N1 flu was MILDER than usual) but from the dangerous and expensive “remedy” to this oversold non-threat.

    All of that said, I do want to stress that Dr. Lindsey has not yet been found guilty, and there are still many unanswered questions relating to this case. But this is not the only shocking story raising questions about the ethics of those involved in creating the CDC’s health recommendations.


    The CDC’s Stance on Water Fluoridation—Another Misleading Recommendation

    Take water fluoridation for example.

    Documents released under the Freedom of Information Act show that since the 1970′s, the dental health professionals in the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) have had sole control over the agency’s stance supporting water fluoridation.

    The CDC is part of a larger administrative structure that provides intra-agency support and resource sharing for health issues that require the input from more than one area of expertise. Other offices that share information and expertise with the CDC include the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office of Minority Health and Health Equity, and the Agency for Toxic Substances. The general assumption has been that the agency used a broad range of expert input to evaluate fluoride before reaching the decision to support water fluoridation.

    After all, since fluoride is swallowed, it stands to reason it may have an impact on your whole body, not just your teeth.

    Yet the documents show that no CDC toxicologists, minority health professionals, experts in diabetes, or others outside the Oral Health Division had any input into the agency’s position.

    This flies in the face of what the agency claims, and what water-, health- and political leaders have believed about the way the CDC operates. Without these additional experts from other fields, can we reasonably believe that the agency has properly assessed the research on whole-body harm from fluoridation? The documents have drawn attention once again to the CDC’s and EPA’s fluoride safety statements, which appear completely at odds with current scientific knowledge, and the fact that no outside experts from related fields were ever included may very well explain this discrepancy.

    CDC Doctor who “Debunked” Vaccine-Autism Link Indicted on Fraud

    Another shocking case involving the CDC is that of Dr. Poul Thorsen, who, after being found to have falsified documents, was indicted on fraud, money laundering and tax evasion after stealing somewhere between $1-2 million in research grant money from the CDC.

    Here you might wonder why I’m faulting the CDC, as the organization was the victim of fraud. The reason I fault them is because they hired Dr. Thorsen to debunk the link between thimerosal in vaccines and autism—which he did to their satisfaction. However, CDC officials may have played a significant role in “guiding” this research to their desired end, and now that Thorsen has been exposed as a fraud, the agency still upholds his research as being of high caliber.

    As explained in a 2010 article by Robert F. Kennedy Jr.:

    “Thorsen was a leading member of a Danish research group that wrote several key studies supporting CDC’s claims that the MMR vaccine and mercury-laden vaccines were safe for children. Thorsen’s 2003 Danish study reported a 20-fold increase in autism in Denmark after that country banned mercury based preservatives in its vaccines. His study concluded that mercury could therefore not be the culprit behind the autism epidemic.

    His study has long been criticized as fraudulent since it failed to disclose that the increase was an artifact of new mandates requiring, for the first time, that autism cases be reported on the national registry. This new law and the opening of a clinic dedicated to autism treatment in Copenhagen accounted for the sudden rise in reported cases rather than, as Thorsen seemed to suggest, the removal of mercury from vaccines.

    Despite this obvious chicanery, CDC has long touted the study as the principal proof that mercury-laced vaccines are safe for infants and young children. Mainstream media, particularly the New York Times, has relied on this study as the basis for its public assurances that it is safe to inject young children with mercury — a potent neurotoxin — at concentrations hundreds of times over the U.S. safety limits.”

    Were CDC Officials in on the Fraud?

    Emails released in response to FOIA filings by parents also show that Kreesten Madsen, one of Dr. Thorsen’s research partners, had acquiesced to the wishes of CDC officials who wanted to cherry pick facts in order to prove vaccine safety. Furthermore, according to an April 28 report by Natural News:

    “From February 2004 through June 2008, says the DOJ indictment, Thorsen allegedly submitted over a dozen fraudulent invoices requesting reimbursement for expenses that were fabricated. Interestingly, these allegedly fraudulent invoices were signed by a laboratory section chief at the CDC, indicating that someone inside the CDC was either duped by Thorsen or potentially involved in the alleged fraud.

    … This is the great untold story of an alleged criminal ring operating inside the CDC, with the purpose of falsifying research that would “disprove” any links between vaccines and toxic side effects.”
    [B]
    Why Does the CDC Not Invalidate Dr. Thorsen’s Research?[B]

    Dr. Thorsen’s studies are frequently quoted in rebuttals to the claim that vaccines may play a role in the disorder. The studies in question were riddled with flaws, yet despite the fact that Thorsen’s studies may actually be a complete sham, the CDC has not officially declared them invalid. In fact, they’re still listed on the CDC website as part of the scientific backing of their stance on autism and vaccine safety.

    Nor has the media jumped on this story and exposed how vaccine-safety claims have been based on junk science by a scam artist. They’ve also failed to question why none of the journals have denounced Dr. Thorsen’s studies, which support the claim that vaccines are safe, while Dr. Wakefield’s research was denounced after the mere insinuation of wrong-doing.

    Furthermore, according to research by Dan Olmsted and Mark Blaxill writing for AgeOfAutism.com, Dr. Thorsen has also been working with the American Psychiatric Association (APA) on an updated definition of “autism” for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), which is slated for release in May 2013. I believe it would be prudent to take a deeper look at his input, to make sure his connections to the CDC and his role in protecting vaccine safety has not tainted the new definition of autism.

    The sad fact is that conflicts of interest color most of the ties between our government and the pharmaceutical industry, and conventional media repeatedly fails to report the truth on these matters.

    So, who can you trust?

    I would recommend trusting yourself. Do your own research, and make your own decisions accordingly. The National Vaccine Information Center (NVIC) is an excellent resource on all things relating to the controversial topic of vaccines. They have been compiling objective evidence showing both sides of the issue and have been one of the strongest voices for vaccine safety and true informed consent.

  2. #2
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    Isn't this old news?


    A highly regarded scientist with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta has been arrested over allegations of bestiality and child molestation. The woman's night watchman boyfriend is also facing charges, police said.

    Dr. Kimberly Quinlan Lindsey, 44, of Decatur, was arrested in DeKalb County Sunday after a six-week investigation into allegations she molested a young boy. Lindsey has been arrested and charged with two counts of child molestation and one count of bestiality, according to a DeKalb County criminal complaint.

    "The bestiality charge is a result of evidence recovered during the investigation," DeKalb County police Lt. Pamela Kunz told The Huffington Post.

    Investigators allegedly found photographs of Lindsey performing lewd acts on two pets. The offenses did not involve the child, police said. Kunz declined to elaborate. "The investigation is still active and we are not releasing further details [on that charge]," she said.

    Lindsey's live-in boyfriend, Thomas Westerman, 42, also faces charges of two counts of child molestation. He was not charged with bestiality, police said.

    The alleged sex acts involving the child took place between January 2010 and August 2011. The child would allegedly spank Lindsey and use an electric sex toy on her.

    The couple's relationship to the alleged victim remains unclear.

    "Detectives were notified by a medical professional in late August of an allegation of the child molestation of a 6-year-old boy," Kunz said.

    "Evidence recovered during the investigation led to the issuance of criminal warrants against the defendants," Kunz added.

    What makes the allegations especially outstanding is that the accused doctor is a woman well-known in her field and highly regarded.

    According to her professional biography on the CDC website, Lindsey holds a doctoral degree in immunology and molecular pathogenesis from Emory University and a bachelor's degree in molecular biology from the University of Central Florida. Lindsey serves as the deputy director for the Laboratory Science Policy and Practice Program Office at the CDC.

    During her long and distinguished career as a health scientist, Lindsey served as deputy division director in the Training Services Division of the Office of Workforce and Career Development and as deputy branch chief in the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention.

    Lindsey has also worked as a senior scientist with the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Program and served as a senior health scientist in the Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response. Her primary role as the senior scientist was to provide "oversight of the $1.5 billion fiscal allocation process for Terrorism Preparedness and Emergency Response funding agency wide," according to the CDC website.

    Since joining the CDC in 1999, Lindsey has received a dozen awards for outstanding performance.

    Westerman began working for the CDC in January as a night watchman. His employee profile at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services lists him as a resource management specialist, Atlanta's WXIA-TV reported.

    A spokesman for the CDC declined to comment on either employee.

    Westerman was released on bail Sunday. Lindsey remains behind bars in lieu of $20,000 bond. Both suspects are scheduled to appear in court for a preliminary hearing on December 1.

    From 2011:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/1...n_1004881.html

    ------------------

    Hmmm........... from May of this year, apparently there is more to the story than originally posted:

    Posted: 4:05 p.m. Thursday, May 9, 2013

    Lawyer for CDC official accused of molestation seeks to use polygraph evidence


    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

    A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention official charged with molesting a 6-year-old boy wants a favorable polygraph test entered into evidence — unprecedented in Georgia criminal cases, her lawyer says.

    Bob Rubin filed the motion last week in DeKalb County Superior Court on behalf of his client, Kimberly Quinlan Lindsey, indicted in January along with her husband, Thomas J. Westerman, on two counts of child molestation each. He says changes to the state’s evidence code, revised effective Jan. 1, 2013 to more closely mirror federal evidence guidelines, allows for the admission of lie detector exams.

    “(We) ask the court to permit the introduction of polygraph evidence only in cases, such as the present case, in which the evidentiary proponent presents ‘clear and convincing proof’ that the polygraph evidence at issue is reliable,” Lindsey’s defense team wrote.

    The test was administered by former FBI polygrapher Marc Foster, who asked Lindsey, 45, whether she had sexual contact with the 6-year-old or participated in illicit acts in his presence, as alleged in the indictment. Her denials “are not indicative of deception,” Foster wrote.

    University of Georgia law professor Ron Carlson said Lindsey’s defense team faces an uphill battle.

    “But this is not a frivolous request by any means,” Carlson said. “A former FBI examiner — you can’t get any better than that.”

    Concerns about accuracy and the “overly influential nature” of the tests have led most judges to block their admission, Carlson said.

    However, “there are some judges that have been sympathetic,” he said, adding, “It may not work on the trial level but could be used in an appeal. They’re definitely seeking to break new ground.”

    The defense also moved to introduce the findings of behavioral scientist Gene Abel, who met with Lindsey before her indictment and concluded she was not a pedophile.

    The allegations against her are “inconsistent with the results of her testing,” said Abel, according to court documents.

    The DeKalb County District Attorney’s Office doesn’t comment on pending cases, spokesman Erik Burton said when asked about the motions Thursday.

    Lindsey faces the possibility of life in prison if found guilty of the charges. Her husband, Westerman, faced similar accusations in 2008 but was cleared of any wrongdoing.

    Those allegations coincided with a divorce suit brought by his first wife. Attorneys for Westerman and Lindsey have suggested that lingering acrimony from that case led to the current charges.

    DeKalb police were notified of the accusations against the couple in August 2011 by a pediatrician who learned of the alleged abuse from the boy’s grandmother.

    Lindsey, an Emory University graduate, returned to work soon after her arrest in October 2011. She’s been with the CDC since 1999 and at one point was responsible for overseeing a $1.5 billion fiscal allocation process for terrorism preparedness.

    http://www.ajc.com/news/news/local/l...ion-see/nXmpp/
    So when's the Revolution? God or Money? Choose.

  3. #3
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  4. #4
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    I don't know, and I can't find much that's current at the moment, but read the above again. She may have been framed, and her husband too.


    Updated: 3:42 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013 | Posted: 3:26 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013
    CDC official denies molestation charges

    Attorneys representing a top official with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday their client “vociferously” denies allegations she molested a 6-year-old boy.

    Kimberly Quinlan Lindsey, deputy director for the Laboratory Science Policy and Practice Program Office at the CDC, was indicted, along with her husband, Thomas Joseph Westerman, Thursday in DeKalb County Superior Court on two counts of child molestation each.

    “We’re extremely disappointed the DA chose to indict this case,” said Bob Rubin, a member of Lindsey’s defense team. “We felt we had shown enough information to the state that they’d understand Dr. Lindsey is not guilty of these charges.”

    Lindsey and Westerman were arrested in October 2011 after a medical professional alerted police about a child molestation allegation. The indictment cites two incidents involving a 6-year-old boy, the first of which allegedly occurred in January 2011 and the second in August of that year.

    “The timeline is going to be critical in this case,” said defense co-counsel Jason Sheffield, noting the lapse in time between the first allegation and the second. “It’s beyond curious.”

    Lindsey’s case has attracted national attention, largely due to her position within the CDC, which she still holds. The Emory University graduate joined the CDC in 1999 and at one point was responsible for overseeing a $1.5 billion fiscal allocation process for terrorism preparedness.

    “These allegations outlined in this indictment are both disturbing and troubling,” DeKalb County District Attorney Robert James said Monday. “We will prosecute both of these individuals to the fullest extent of the law.”

    Lindsey, 45, is alleged to have engaged in sexual activity with the boy in the presence of Westerman, a resource management specialist with the CDC at the time of his arrest. Westerman, 43, allegedly instructed the child to touch Lindsey while she was partially undressed, the indictment filed in DeKalb Superior Court states.

    The couple shared a home in Decatur at the time. They’ve since married, according to Lindsey’s lawyers.

    “This has caused significant trauma in her life,” said Rubin, adding his client fears the negative publicity generated by media coverage of the allegations may result in the loss of her job.

    When asked about Lindsey’s future with the CDC, agency spokesman Tom Skinner said Monday, “Due process will play itself out,” declining further comment.

    Lindsey’s husband, a resource management specialist at the time of his arrest, no longer works for the CDC, Skinner said.

    Westerman’s attorney, Reid Thompson, said he would withhold comment until reviewing the indictment.

    Meanwhile, Lindsey, the mother of a college freshman, is “ready to fight,” Rubin said.

    “There’s far more to this case than what has been laid out in the indictment,” he said. “These charges are totally out of character with who we know Dr. Lindsey to be.”

    http://www.ajc.com/news/news/local/c...charges/nWGZM/
    So when's the Revolution? God or Money? Choose.

  5. #5
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    I think she may have pissed someone off ?
    Be Safe

    To kill the vampires you must lead them into the light.

    They will come for you next !

  6. #6
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    Isn't this old news?

    It looks to me like this story is from October 2011

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Murt View Post
    Isn't this old news?

    It looks to me like this story is from October 2011
    Yes,it's old news.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by smokin View Post
    I think she may have pissed someone off ?
    That's usually the way it goes. Put something on your PC then charge you for it.

  9. #9
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    They could have been set up. Not beyond the realm of possibility.

    I was not aware of the datedness of the OP. But there is more in the article than just the allegations. Which the following quote sums it up, imo.

    All of that said, I do want to stress that Dr. Lindsey has not yet been found guilty, and there are still many unanswered questions relating to this case. But this is not the only shocking story raising questions about the ethics of those involved in creating the CDC’s health recommendations.


    No matter what the outcome is, this criminal organization is not be trusted, afaiak.

    eta. If she is being framed, then by whom and why? Speculating - Could be that she was about to turn whistle blower against the medical mafia (aka. the CDC).
    Last edited by Buckster; 09-19-2013 at 10:19 PM.

  10. #10
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    Its posable she is not going along with a plain and seeing how out of control our government is I would not put it pass them to pull something like that.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by mzkitty View Post
    Dr. Kimberly Quinlan Lindsey, 44, of Decatur, was arrested in DeKalb County Sunday after a six-week investigation into allegations she molested a young boy. Lindsey has been arrested and charged with two counts of child molestation and one count of bestiality, according to a DeKalb County criminal complaint.

    "The bestiality charge is a result of evidence recovered during the investigation," DeKalb County police Lt. Pamela Kunz told The Huffington Post.

    Investigators allegedly found photographs of Lindsey performing lewd acts on two pets. The offenses did not involve the child, police said.

    ....

    A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention official charged with molesting a 6-year-old boy wants a favorable polygraph test entered into evidence — unprecedented in Georgia criminal cases, her lawyer says.

    ...

    The test was administered by former FBI polygrapher Marc Foster, who asked Lindsey, 45, whether she had sexual contact with the 6-year-old or participated in illicit acts in his presence, as alleged in the indictment. Her denials “are not indicative of deception,” Foster wrote.

    The defense also moved to introduce the findings of behavioral scientist Gene Abel, who met with Lindsey before her indictment and concluded she was not a pedophile.
    Sounds to me like she possibly didn't do anything with the minor child, but it is odd they aren't denying the animal sex stuff. I don't think they can. There is photographic evidence, so the only thing I can think of if they fight those charges are some sort of "conspiracy" charge and claim the images are fakes planted by someone who wants to get back at her.

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