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ALERT Cargill salt mine under LAKE ERIE Halted, lake floor sinking, would sinkhole drain lake?
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  1. #1
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    20 Cargill salt mine under LAKE ERIE Halted, lake floor sinking, would sinkhole drain lake?

    OR FLOOD ALL OF CLEVELAND and environs? This news, buried in another thread, deserves it's own thread! Cleveland is in danger.
    A massive salt mine under Lake Erie has halted operations because they discovered the roof of the mine( the lake floor) is sinking. If Lake Erie water penetrates that roof IT WOULD BE A DISASTER. IT WOULD FORM A GROWING, WHIRLING SINKHOLE DRAINING Lake Erie water so violently that in my opinion it could REFORM THE GEOGRAPHY (Terraform) of the whole region!
    Actually, I believe those tin foil Hat maps showing the USA split in half by water could actually happen! THEY ARE VASTLY UNDERSTATING THE DANGER.


    CLEVELAND, Ohio -- The Cargill salt mine below Lake Erie has stopped mining because of concerns that the roof 1,800 feet below ground could collapse.

    That's according to Cargill spokesman Mark Klein, who said the company stopped mining salt on Monday after its first shift, sending about 100 employees home for the week with pay.

    "We don't want anybody in that area in case part of the roof comes down," Klein said.

    The problem is called "convergence," Klein said. "Either the floor is coming up a little or the ceiling is coming down a little."

    Klein said Cargill monitors measurements of the shaft and the room at the bottom of the mine on a regular basis.

    "We're looking for movements of like one one-hundredths of an inch," he said.

    The mine has been operating for more than 50 years and has been owned by Cargill since 1997. The salt is extracted from the face of the mine using ammonium nitrate explosives.

    The company is still operating and shipping salt, it's just not mining any new salt, Klein said. About 75 people are still working above ground at the site.

    "Over the past few weeks we've seen some data points that we need to do more study on," Klein said.

    Asked if the company has had previous safety concerns with the mine, Klein said, "Nothing quite like this."

    Cargill notified the Ohio Department of Natural Resources about the closure this morning "and they said they didn't need our assistance at this time," ODNR spokesman Mark Bruce said.


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    ODNR inspectors will stay in contact with Cargill and its experts, he said, while Cargill will determine "what action they are going to take to remedy the situation."
    An ODNR inspector will monitor progress and the mine will not reopen until ODNR gives its approval, Bruce said.

    Bruce did not express any concerns about adverse effects on Lake Erie.

    A typical coal mine is 100 to 200 feet below ground, he said, while the Cargill salt mine is 1,700 feet below the bottom of the lake, which means it's highly unlikely a breach of the mine would contaminate the lake.

    The Cargill mine is a major supplier of salt to states and municipalities across the snow belt, many of which probably have leftover salt from milder winters the past two years, Klein said.

    Last year, Cargill supplied road salt to 48 Ohio counties, more than any other salt provider in the state, according to a spokesman with the Ohio Department of Transportation, but this year it's slated to supply only 33 counties.

    Should the Cargill mine be closed permanently, the market would adjust and production would increase elsewhere, Klein said.

    "We have two other mines in the U.S.," Klein said. "We also have competitors."

    Klein said Cargill has salt mines in southern Louisiana and under Cayuga Lake in Lansing, N.Y.

    Klein said many of the customers served by the Cargill mine have their prices for road salt this winter locked in under contract.

    Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine filed an antitrust lawsuit in 2012 against Cargill and Morton Salt, which has a mine at Fairport Harbor, claiming they conspired to keep road salt prices artificially high.

    A Tuscarawas County judge dismissed one of the counts, which claimed monopolization, in April, while another count claiming conspiracy still is proceeding, said Dan Tierney, spokesman with the Ohio Attorney General's Office.

    In 2010, Cargill Deicing Technology announced it was spending $13.8 million to expand the capacity of the mine operations based on Whiskey Island at the mouth of the Cuyahoga River.

    "It's all done," Klein said of the expansion. "A lot of it was for additional conveyor belts."

    Companies operating at the Cargill mine site were cited with violations or orders by the U.S. Department of Labor's Mine Safety and Health Administration 14 times in the past month, but none of the concerns appear to involve the structural integrity of the mine.

    Cargill Deicing Technology was issued six of those citations for violations, including two considered significant and substantial, according to the Mine Safety and Health Administration website. One of those had to do with keeping the workplace neat and clean and the other with ensuring safe passage on the site.

    A spokesman for the Mine Safety and Health Administration said inspectors and technical support personnel are on site and investigating.

    Mine workers are represented by Teamsters Local 436. Its president, Gary Tiboni, could not immediately be reached for comment.



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    Last edited by ainitfunny; 08-22-2013 at 02:12 PM.
    Poison Ivy is still Poison Ivy even if you transplant it into a rose garden and call it a rose.

  2. #2
    Lake Erie has a volume of 115 cubic miles. The salt mine has a volume of maybe .01 cubic miles, by my back-of-envelope calc. The salt mine can't take in enough water from the lake to affect the lake for more than a few minutes of local wave action.

  3. #3
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    This story fits is with yours quite well as far as I can see.


    video shows sinkhole swallowing trees in seconds
    by The Extinction Protocol




    August 22, 2013 – LOUISIANA - Assumption Parish officials on Wednesday released a video showing the sinkhole swallowing several trees in a matter of seconds. The video, posted on the city's blog, is described a “slough in” that happened around 7:15 p.m. Wednesday. The collapse comes a little more than a year after an area around Bayou Corne dissolved into liquefied muck. The sinkhole, discovered Aug. 3, 2012, has grown to 24 acres, and 350 residents in the tiny community have no end in sight to their evacuation order because the hole continues to widen. The state of Louisiana earlier this month said it is suing Texas Brine LLC for the environmental damage and massive sinkhole that officials say was caused by the collapse of a salt dome cavern operated by the company. The sinkhole is in a swampy area of Assumption Parish about 40 miles south of Baton Rouge. –NOLA
    .
    "The karma café has no menu......You get served what you deserve!"

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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by bw View Post
    Lake Erie has a volume of 115 cubic miles. The salt mine has a volume of maybe .01 cubic miles, by my back-of-envelope calc. The salt mine can't take in enough water from the lake to affect the lake for more than a few minutes of local wave action.
    You demonstrate a vast misunderstanding of what the force of water can do. The mine has entrances through which the water, under pressure would violently escape and make bigger. It would simply REMOVE even higher elevation obstacles by it's flow and force. The volume of Lake Erie is constantly being replenished by the Great Lakes constantly refilling it, as it drains over Niagra Falls to the Atlantic.
    Poison Ivy is still Poison Ivy even if you transplant it into a rose garden and call it a rose.

  5. #5
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    The level of Lake Erie changes more from changes in wind direction (east or west) on a daily basis than the effect of this mine some how opening a 1600 foot vertical channel to the lake bed and filling from the lake. Remember that this 1600 foot of rock is MANY different layers of several different kinds of metamorphic rock...


    IMO (and I live less than a straight line mile from the lake shore 50 feet above it) your concern is, while interesting, MUCH overblown...particularly after MANY late night discussions with hydrologists, and geologists hereabouts..
    "I must not fear.
    Fear is the mind-killer.
    Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration.
    I will face my fear.
    I will permit it to pass over me and through me.
    And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path.
    Where the fear has gone there will be nothing....only I will remain"

    Frank Herbert "Dune" "Bene Gesserit Anti-Fear Litany"


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  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by ainitfunny View Post
    You demonstrate a vast misunderstanding of what the force of water can do. The mine has entrances through which the water, under pressure would violently escape and make bigger. It would simply REMOVE even higher elevation obstacles by it's flow and force.
    I'm reasonably well-versed in what the force of water can do. I've felt some of it personally. But this mine isn't big enough to have a significant effect on the lake.

    The current collapsing salt dome in Ascension Parish is bigger than the pond it's under. That pond could entirely disappear (briefly) any time. The dome under Lake Peigneur was bigger than the lake, so it (briefly) went dry. Pretty exciting.

    The mine under Lake Erie is just too small. Lake Erie has a surface area of 10,000 square miles. Losing my guesstimated .01 cubic miles into this mine would temporarily lower Lake Erie by less than a tenth of an inch.

    Big local waves, lots of excitement, cool video, and then life goes on.

  7. #7
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    Also at this point it's extremely premature to jump to dire conclusions. They measure roof/floor changes to the hundredths of an inch. The detected changes could be very minor indeed. Something to watch but it would take much more info than we have to become alarmed over this.
    What is the lake of fire? What is it's purpose? Is the lake of fire eternal hell? Is there any hope of escape for those cast into this lake?
    http://bible-truths.com/lake1.html

  8. #8
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    Ainit, your wild-eyed opinion, while interesting, is impossible. The area of the mine is far too small to cause more than a little burp in the lake, should the collapse occur.

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    Intersting map

    http://www.saltinstitute.org/content...oad/4348/23631
    Attached Images

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Lilbitsnana View Post
    Intersting map
    Shows where seas dried up.

  11. #11
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    When I lived in Grand Rapids I would on occasion go to an old vast underground mine to check a water sensor. The tunnels go for miles under G.R. If memory serves it was an old gypsum mine and was being used for document storage. Vast majority of people are totally unaware of it.
    What is the lake of fire? What is it's purpose? Is the lake of fire eternal hell? Is there any hope of escape for those cast into this lake?
    http://bible-truths.com/lake1.html

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bw View Post
    Shows where seas dried up.
    I had no idea we had such large areas of salt deposit. I knew of about three areas, but not the rest.

    I thought it interesting.

  13. #13
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    Interesting in that it leaves out a LOT of surface production in Central NY...Solvay etc..
    "I must not fear.
    Fear is the mind-killer.
    Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration.
    I will face my fear.
    I will permit it to pass over me and through me.
    And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path.
    Where the fear has gone there will be nothing....only I will remain"

    Frank Herbert "Dune" "Bene Gesserit Anti-Fear Litany"


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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by night driver View Post
    Interesting in that it leaves out a LOT of surface production in Central NY...Solvay etc..
    If you enlarge their map, Solvay is included, although it is towards the very top of the included area.

    Compare it to google maps, it's in the covered area.

  15. #15
    The water coming over Niagara per day is more than is lost from Michigan/Huron via the St. Clair River IIRC, but not by a whole lot. Coupled with all the other losses, I doubt there's enough H2O in the whole system to create some kind of biblical catastrophe.

  16. #16
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    Lake Erie is 572 feet above sea level, the Ohio river is 455 feet aboce sea level.
    CANALS LINKING THE TWO bodies of water already exist...The Miami-erie canal, and the Ohio-Erie canal. The Ohio river empties into the Mississippi, which is 192 feet above sea level. The hydraulic head is there, it only needs the sudden washing out of the obstacles to flow.
    Poison Ivy is still Poison Ivy even if you transplant it into a rose garden and call it a rose.

  17. #17
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    Even if there were such a failure, Erie wouldn't empty.

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    Salt has been mined under Detroit for.........well centuries. Detroit is an old city.

    Now if that salt mine collapses, ain't no big deal is it?

  19. #19
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    A reasonably careless exam of topography and the maps thereof covering Cuyahoga, Lake, Sumit, Portage and Medina counties, as well as any other "lake shore" counties would put this concern to rest...

    I was helping someone researching some PAW Fx and they suggested the Great Lakes heading south. Fortunately I did NOT have a mouth full of Guinness so there was no waste, After I showed him the topos, he moved his whole dang story...
    "I must not fear.
    Fear is the mind-killer.
    Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration.
    I will face my fear.
    I will permit it to pass over me and through me.
    And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path.
    Where the fear has gone there will be nothing....only I will remain"

    Frank Herbert "Dune" "Bene Gesserit Anti-Fear Litany"


    http://bluemudpatriot.wordpress.com/

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    Even if there were such a failure, Erie wouldn't empty.
    Of course not. It is constantly being refilled by the Great Lakes. Don't attribute that stupid conjecture to ME. I never said that. What might happen, I theorize, is a sudden new outlet for Lake Erie water form, sending some of it to the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers.
    Poison Ivy is still Poison Ivy even if you transplant it into a rose garden and call it a rose.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    Ainit, your wild-eyed opinion, while interesting, is impossible. The area of the mine is far too small to cause more than a little burp in the lake, should the collapse occur.
    Ahh...the voice of reason...Thank You Dennis
    JOHN 3:16 / John 8:32 And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you FREE.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by timbo View Post
    Salt has been mined under Detroit for.........well centuries. Detroit is an old city.

    Now if that salt mine collapses, ain't no big deal is it?
    For Detroit? Probably not. For the salt mine beneath Detroit? Well yeah, it won't exist anymore! And this is why I simply mentioned this in the other thread instead of starting a thread on the topic. While germaine to the other story it's not really a crisis, nor will it probably be anytime in the near future... so long as no one is down there at the time of collapse.

    K-

  23. #23
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    When one considers water one needs to remember that water tends to run DOWN hill...

    the watershed divide for Lake Erie vs Ohio River is about 60 miles south of me, about 25 miles north of Mansfield. It's a fairly high point, too....ANY water north of that point runs NORTH into Lake Erie....

    AKA DOWN HILL....
    "I must not fear.
    Fear is the mind-killer.
    Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration.
    I will face my fear.
    I will permit it to pass over me and through me.
    And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path.
    Where the fear has gone there will be nothing....only I will remain"

    Frank Herbert "Dune" "Bene Gesserit Anti-Fear Litany"


    http://bluemudpatriot.wordpress.com/

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by ainitfunny View Post
    Of course not. It is constantly being refilled by the Great Lakes. Don't attribute that stupid conjecture to ME. I never said that. What might happen, I theorize, is a sudden new outlet for Lake Erie water form, sending some of it to the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers.
    Are you implying that the water flooding into the mine will shoot out the access shafts like a geyser, thus forming a new outlet? If the mine collapses and floods the water will only rise to the elevation of the lake surface.

    More remotely, with a mine collapse would be the formation of a seiche (think of a tidal wave in a lake). It would have to be very large and energetic enough to wash out adjacent land to a sufficient depth to form a new river channel. Doubt that the relatively small displacement would generate a big enough wave.

    Now, if a mine collapse were to trigger ancient faults into activity which causing elevation changes in the land adjacent to the lake, then its possible you might get one or more new outlets.
    Every welfare payment that is made, every piece of crap 'art' that is gov't funded, every 'environmental' , 'safety' and tax regulation made 'for the children' signifies,
    in the final sense, a theft from tax paying public so that they may suffer hunger and cold, so that the parasites, bureaucrats, morally unfit and other such trash may be cared and coddled.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by night driver View Post
    When one considers water one needs to remember that water tends to run DOWN hill.
    Ah, but did you know a lake exists in Yellowstone Park in which streams from different ends of the lake drain into two entirely different drainage basins? I just learned that this week, although I've already forgotten the name of the lake.

    "... would sinkhole drain lake?" (in the thread title) must be semantically different from "emptying Lake Erie," although I admit to not be able to grasp the distinction.

  26. #26
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    What's the EPA fine for dumping that much SH**water on hell?
    "I've always wondered what the 1920's and 1930's were like, but I never wanted to see it from the German perspective....."
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    Nothing. The EPA **IS ** hell.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by tanstaafl View Post
    Ah, but did you know a lake exists in Yellowstone Park in which streams from different ends of the lake drain into two entirely different drainage basins? I just learned that this week, although I've already forgotten the name of the lake.
    No problem with the concept if the lake is in a saddle between 2 mountains or in a saddle in a mountain range....
    "I must not fear.
    Fear is the mind-killer.
    Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration.
    I will face my fear.
    I will permit it to pass over me and through me.
    And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path.
    Where the fear has gone there will be nothing....only I will remain"

    Frank Herbert "Dune" "Bene Gesserit Anti-Fear Litany"


    http://bluemudpatriot.wordpress.com/

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnGaltfla View Post
    What's the EPA fine for dumping that much SH**water on hell?
    Hey...we done cleaned up our mess....why, with the zebra mussels doin THEIR part, you can see the bottom of the lake in -- oh ---WAY MORE than 6 inches of water now...
    "I must not fear.
    Fear is the mind-killer.
    Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration.
    I will face my fear.
    I will permit it to pass over me and through me.
    And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path.
    Where the fear has gone there will be nothing....only I will remain"

    Frank Herbert "Dune" "Bene Gesserit Anti-Fear Litany"


    http://bluemudpatriot.wordpress.com/

  30. #30
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    There ARE consequences beyond mere loss of the mine:

    Retsof Salt Mine[edit source | editbeta]

    In 1994, the Retsof Salt Mine was the largest salt mine in North America, and the second largest in the world. Three hundred people worked within the 6,000 acres (24 km2; 9.4 sq mi) of excavated space, 1,000 feet (300 m) below ground, extracting salt from a natural deposit for use as road salt, table salt, and in industry. In March 1994, however, the ceiling in one of the large underground chambers collapsed, the first of a series of effects caused by groundwater entering the salt deposit, which had been dry for all of the 110 previous years of mining at the site. Over the next 21 months, the mine cavities collapsed and filled with water. Mining operations scrambled to work the accessible areas before the spreading flood, until operations were suspended when the mine was fully filled with water, in 1995. The effect of filling all this space lowered the aquifer, leaving many drinking water wells dry, and led to surface subsidence, even sinkholes 200 feet (61 m) wide, damaging structures and highways. 8 feet (2.4 m) or 9 feet (2.7 m) of additional subsidence is expected to take place over the next century.[1]
    HERE IS MORE ABOUT THE CONSEQUENCES http://ny.water.usgs.gov/pubs/fs/fs01798/FS017-98.pdf
    Poison Ivy is still Poison Ivy even if you transplant it into a rose garden and call it a rose.

  31. #31
    It is constantly being refilled by the Great Lakes

    The lakes are barely being refilled. As above, Michigan/Huron loses almost as much as comes in via Niagara. Superior has lost over a foot in the past decade, and at one point in the recent past Ontario lost more than half a foot in a year. Marinas are having problems, as is shipping on the lakes. Echoing ND below, there's barely enough water to fill the lakes now, let alone force it uphill through the watershed. You mention the (long defunct, save for historic remnants) canals - remember, these were only possible through the use of locks. It's not a water level route.

  32. #32
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    Malaysia tin mine collapse (mine was near ocean and ocean suddenly decided to reclaim, showing water power)
    Last edited by ainitfunny; 08-23-2013 at 01:35 AM.
    Poison Ivy is still Poison Ivy even if you transplant it into a rose garden and call it a rose.

  33. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by ainitfunny View Post
    mine was near ocean and ocean suddenly decided to reclaim, showing water power
    The ocean didn't make any decisions. The mine wall was too near the beach, water seeped through and weakened the dike. The ocean is notably without intention of any kind.

  34. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by tanstaafl View Post
    Ah, but did you know a lake exists in Yellowstone Park in which streams from different ends of the lake drain into two entirely different drainage basins?
    If you've found a situation where water does NOT go downhill, please enlighten us.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by bw View Post
    If you've found a situation where water does NOT go downhill, please enlighten us.
    LOLOLOLOL
    JOHN 3:16 / John 8:32 And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you FREE.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lilbitsnana View Post
    oh, GOOD, another map for that map thread.......... thanx

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    Quote Originally Posted by ainitfunny View Post
    Of course not. It is constantly being refilled by the Great Lakes. Don't attribute that stupid conjecture to ME. I never said that. What might happen, I theorize, is a sudden new outlet for Lake Erie water form, sending some of it to the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers.
    Actually, you DID say it. Plainly. Your thread title:

    Cargill salt mine under LAKE ERIE Halted, lake floor sinking, would sinkhole drain lake?

  38. #38
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    Well, I admit I misspoke because what I had in mind was redirecting part of Great Lakes water into another outlet besides the St Lawrence Seaway, Not "draining it DRY". I worded it poorly I admit.

    Ps. The poster who thought the Great Lakes were FILLED by the St Lawrence Seaway has it backwards.
    Poison Ivy is still Poison Ivy even if you transplant it into a rose garden and call it a rose.

  39. #39
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    It has happened before



    http://www.damninteresting.com/lake-...ortex-of-doom/

    Early in the morning on November 21, 1980, twelve men decided to abandon their oil drilling rig on the suspicion that it was beginning to collapse beneath them. They had been probing for oil under the floor of Lake Peigneur when their drill suddenly seized up at about 1,230 feet below the muddy surface, and they were unable free it. In their attempts to work the drill loose, which is normally fairly easy at that shallow depth, the men heard a series of loud pops, just before the rig tilted precariously towards the water.

    At the time, Lake Peigneur was an unremarkable body of water near New Iberia, Louisiana. Though the freshwater lake covered 1,300 acres of land, it was only eleven feet deep. A small island there was home to a beautiful botanical park, oil wells dotted the landscape, and far beneath the lake were miles of tunnels for the Diamond Crystal salt mine.

    Concluding that something had gone terribly wrong, the men on the rig cut the attached barges loose, scrambled off the rig, and moved to the shore about 300 yards away. Shortly after they abandoned the $5 million Texaco drilling platform, the crew watched in amazement as the huge platform and derrick overturned, and disappeared into a lake that was supposed to be shallow. Soon the water around that position began to turn. It was slow at first, but it steadily accelerated until it became a fast-moving whirlpool a quarter of a mile in diameter, with its center directly over the drill site.

    As the whirlpool was forming on the surface, Junius Gaddison, an electrician working in the salt mines below, heard a loud, strange noise coming down the corridor. Soon he discovered the sound's source, which was rushing downhill towards him: fuel drums banging together as they were carried along the shaft by a knee-deep stream of muddy water. He quickly called in the alarm, and the mine's lights were flashed three times to signal its immediate evacuation. Many of the 50 miners working that morning, most as deep as 1,500 feet below the surface, saw the evacuation signal and began to run for the 1,300 foot level, where they could catch an elevator to the surface. However, when they reached the third level, they were blocked by deep water.

    Clearly, the salt dome which contained the mine had been penetrated by the drill crew on the lake. Texaco, who had ordered the oil probe, was aware of the salt mine's presence and had planned accordingly; but somewhere a miscalculation had been made, which placed the drill site directly above one of the salt mine's 80-foot-high, 50-foot-wide upper shafts. As the freshwater poured in through the original 14-inch-wide hole, it quickly dissolved the salt away, making the hole grow bigger by the second. The water pouring into the mine also dissolved the huge salt pillars which supported the ceilings, and the shafts began to collapse.

    As most of the miners headed for the surface, a maintenance foreman named Randy LaSalle drove around to the remote areas of the mine which hadn't seen the evacuation signal, and warned the miners there to evacuate. The miners whose escape was slowed by water on the third level used mine carts and diesel powered vehicles to make their way up to the 1,300 foot level, where they each waited their turn to ride the slow, 8-person elevator to the surface as the mine below them filled with water. Although it seemed to take forever to get out, all 50 miners managed to escape with their lives.




    Barges being sucked into the vortex.
    Meanwhile, up on the surface, the tremendous sucking power of the whirlpool was causing violent destruction. It swallowed another nearby drilling platform whole, as well as a barge loading dock, 70 acres of soil from Jefferson Island, trucks, trees, structures, and a parking lot. The sucking force was so strong that it reversed the flow of a 12-mile-long canal which led out to the Gulf of Mexico, and dragged 11 barges from that canal into the swirling vortex, where they disappeared into the flooded mines below. It also overtook a manned tug on the canal, which struggled against the current for as long as possible before the crew had to leap off onto the canal bank and watch as the lake consumed their boat.

    After three hours, the lake was drained of its 3.5 billion gallons of water. The water from the canal, now flowing in from the Gulf of Mexico, formed a 150-foot waterfall into the crater where the lake had been, filling it with salty ocean water. As the canal refilled the crater over the next two days, nine of the sunken barges popped back to the surface like corks, though the drilling rigs and tug were left entombed in the ruined salt mine.

    Despite the enormous destruction of property, no human life was lost in this disaster, nor were there any serious injuries. Within two days, what had previously been an eleven-foot-deep freshwater body was replaced with a 1,300-foot-deep saltwater lake. The lake's biology was changed drastically, and it became home to many species of plants and fish which had not been there previously.

    Of course numerous lawsuits were filed, and they were subsequently settled out-of-court for many millions of dollars. The owners of the Crystal Diamond salt mine received a combined $45 million in damages from Texaco and the oil drilling company, and got out of the salt mining business for good.

    No official blame for the miscalculation was ever decided, because all of the evidence was sucked down the drain, but the story described here is the generally accepted theory of what caused this massive disaster.








    I am aware that this lake is nowhere near the size of Lake Erie but there is still potential for a giant sucking action.
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

  40. #40
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    Wow!!

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