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HEALTH 10 Signs Death is Near
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  1. #1
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    10 Signs Death is Near

    http://www.caring.com/articles/signs...source=taboola

    10 Signs Death Is Near

    What to expect and how to respond to the natural dying process

    By Paula Spencer Scott
    Last updated: July 24, 2013



    No one can predict the moment of death. But physicians and nurses involved in end-of-life care know that certain symptoms are usually associated with the body's shutting down. These signs of approaching death are specific to the natural dying process (apart from the effects of particular illnesses the person may have).
    Not all dying symptoms show up in every person, but most people experience some combination of the following in the final days or hours:
    1. Loss of appetite
    Energy needs decline. The person may begin to resist or refuse meals and liquids, or accept only small amounts of bland foods (such as hot cereals). Meat, which is hard to digest, may be refused first. Even favorite foods hold little appeal.
    Near the very end of life, the dying person may be physically unable to swallow.
    How to respond: Don't force-feed; follow the person's cues even though you may be distressed by a loss of interest in eating. Periodically offer ice chips, a popsicle, or sips of water. Use a moistened warm cloth around the mouth and apply balm to the lips to keep them moist and comfortable.


    2. Excessive fatigue and sleep
    The person may begin to sleep the majority of the day and night as metabolism slows and the decline in food and water contribute to dehydration. He or she becomes difficult to rouse from sleep. The fatigue is so pronounced that awareness of immediate surroundings begins to drift.
    How to respond: Permit sleep. Avoid jostling the person awake. Assume that everything you say can be heard, as the sense of hearing is thought to persist, even when the person is unconscious, in a coma, or otherwise not responsive.


    3. Increased physical weakness
    A decline in food intake and lack of energy leads to less energy, even for activities like lifting one's head or shifting in bed. The person may even have difficulty sipping from a straw.
    How to respond: Focus on keeping the person comfortable.


    4. Mental confusion or disorientation
    Organs begin to fail, including the brain. Higher-order consciousness tends to change. "Few conditions leave people hyperaware when they're dying," says palliative-care physician Ira Byock, author of Dying Well.
    The person may not be aware of where he or she is or who else is in the room, may speak or reply less often, may respond to people who can't be seen in the room by others (see Passing Away: What to Expect When Witnessing a Loved One's Death), may seem to say nonsensical things, may be confused about time, or may act restless and pick at bed linens.
    How to respond: Remain calm and reassuring. Speak to the person softly, and identify yourself when you approach.


    5. Labored breathing
    Breath intakes and exhales become raggedy, irregular, and labored. A distinctive pattern called Cheyne-Stokes respiration might be heard: a loud, deep inhalation is followed by a pause of not breathing (apnea) for between five seconds to as long as a full minute, before a loud, deep breath resumes and again slowly peters out.
    Sometimes excessive secretions create loud, gurling inhalations and exhalations that some people call a "death rattle."
    How to respond: The stopped breathing or loud rattle can be alarming to listeners, but the dying person is unaware of this changed breathing; focus on overall comfort. Positions that may help: the head slightly elevated with a pillow, sitting up well-supported, or the head or lying body tilted to the side slightly. Moisten the mouth with a wet cloth and moisturize with lip balm or petroleum jelly.
    If there's a lot of phlegm, allow it to drain naturally from the mouth, since suctioning it out can increase its quantity. A vaporizer in the room might help. Some people are given oxygen for comfort. Be a calm, physical presence, stroking the arm or speaking softly.


    6. Social withdrawal
    As the body shuts down, the dying person may gradually lose interest in those nearby. He or she may stop talking or mutter unintelligibly, stop responding to questions, or simply turn away.
    A few days before receding socially for the last time, the dying person sometimes surprises loved ones with an unexpected burst of alert, attentive behavior. This can last less than an hour or up to a full day.
    How to respond: Be aware that this is a natural part of the dying process and not a reflection of your relationship. Maintain a physical presence by touching the dying person and continuing to talk, if it feels appropriate, without demanding anything back. Treasure an alert interlude if and when it occurs, because it's almost always fleeting.


    7. Changes in urination
    Little going in (as the person loses interest in food and drink) means little coming out. Dropping blood pressure, part of the dying process (and therefore not treated at this point, in tandem with other symptoms), also contributes to the kidneys shutting down. The concentrated urine is brownish, reddish, or tea-colored.
    Loss of bladder and bowel control may happen late in the dying process.
    How to respond: Hospice medical staff sometimes decides that a catheter is necessary, although not in the final hours of life. Kidney failure can increase blood toxins and contribute to a peaceful coma before death. Add a bed pad when placing fresh sheets.

    8. Swelling in the feet and ankles
    As the kidneys are less able to process bodily fluids, they can accumulate and get deposited in areas of the body away from the heart, in the feet and ankles especially. These places, and sometimes also the hands, face, or feet, take on a swollen, puffy appearance.
    How to respond: Usually no special treatment (such as diuretics) is given when the swelling seems directly related to the dying process. (The swelling is the result of the natural death process, not its cause.)


    9. Coolness in the tips of the fingers and toes
    In the hours or minutes before death, blood circulation draws back from the periphery of the body to help the vital organs. As this happens, the extremities (hands, feet, fingers, toes) become notably cooler. Nail beds may also look more pale, or bluish.
    How to respond: A warm blanket can keep the person comfortable, or he or she may be oblivious. The person may complain about the weight of coverings on the legs, so keep them loose.


    10. Mottled veins
    Skin that had been uniformly pale or ashen develops a distinctive pattern of purplish/reddish/bluish mottling as one of the later signs of death approaching. This is the result of reduced blood circulation. It may be seen first on the soles of the feet.

    How to respond: No special steps need to be taken.
    Note: These general signs of impending death can vary in sequence and combination from person to person. If a person is on life support (respirator, feeding tube), the process dying follows can be different. The signs of death listed here describe a natural dying process.

  2. #2
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    Five Stages of Dealing with Grief:

    Psychiatrist and author Elisabeth K√bler-Ross identified the five stages of grief that can be expected when a person is dying or knows someone who is dying.

    1. Anger

    People tend to get angry when they lack control of a situation. They may be angry and upset at their loved one, or the doctor, or even God. Because they are powerless and unable to change things, they blame others for their painful feelings.
    2. Denial

    Coping with the idea of dying or losing someone is a hard concept to grasp. People don’t want to believe it’s true and begin denying that anything is wrong. They convince themselves that they heard wrong, that the doctor is wrong or that it’s just not possible.
    3. Bargaining

    This is based on the theory that good things happen to good people. When someone is dealing with death, they sometimes experience guilt and dwell over the “if-onlys.” For example, if only I had been a better person, this never would have happened. They pray for a miracle or promise to be a better person if they (or their loved one) can overcome the illness.
    4. Depression

    Once people come to terms with the fact that they are dying and there is nothing they can do to change it, they become depressed. This stage involves despair, constant crying, fatigue, and feelings of sadness. They realize death is inevitable and begin focusing on feelings of great loss.
    5. Acceptance

    This is the final stage of mourning the loss of life. Basically, it’s accepting the fact that death will or has occurred. The person experiences closure and can now move on with their life.

    These stages are typical reactions to grief but everyone deals with loss in their own way. If you are dealing with death, take advantage of the hospice services that will help you grieve on your own terms, at your own pace.

  3. #3
    Thank you.

  4. #4
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    I just hope I get to die 'with my boots off.'
    "All the perplexities, confusion and distress in America arises not from deficits in the Constitution or Confederation , nor from want of honor and virtue, so much as downright ignorance of the nature of coin, credit, and circulation." -- John Adams
    "The issue which has swept down the centuries and which will have to be fought sooner or later is the people versus the banks." -- Lord Acton

  5. #5
    F%%% I feel that way everyday..........

  6. #6
    I'm 8 out of 10. I guess I'm only partially dead.
    "Fight the good fight of faith"

  7. #7
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    I am getting pretty close too but I want to go with my boots on and my home completely clean, freshly showered, hair and nails done legs shaved, lots of goodies for my hubby to eat. All the laundry up to date and no closets left to clean by my children. I pray every day that I will be a better person every day than I was the day before and I ask GOD'S forgiveness for my transgressions. I know there are some that I am not aware of. I want all of my children to take good care of my hubby and keep a close eye out but not to be overly codeling (sp?). GOD's has given me a long life and the ability to take care of all of the things that I needed to do and anytime now, I shall be ready. But, I do not want to linger or suffer anymore so that others have to take care of me. I'm a very soft hearted person but I can be as tough as nails when I need to be. So, GOD has put up with a lot from me. I sure do love HIM.

  8. #8
    Thank You

  9. #9
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    I know the nurse who sat with my mom while she was dying (over 20 years ago, now) said that -- before it became so common to drug dying patients into unconsciousness--- that she would often hear dying patients testify to seeing "supernatural" things---things that could not be explained away by dementia, drugs, illness, pain, or approaching death.

    One night about a week before my mother's death, she woke up during the night, and after the nurse and I together had given her a drink of water and tended to her needs, and she was settling back to sleep, she suddenly gestured across the room to a folding chair and said, "Who is that?" Thinking she was confused, I said, "You know her, mama, that's your nurse. She's been here every night," to which my mama replied with an impatient toss of her head in the nurse's direction at the side of her bed, "I don't mean her; I mean HER" and she again pointed to the empty folding chair at the FOOT of her bed.

    I felt the small hairs rise on my neck, but I kept my voice low and calm, and instead of saying, "There's no one there, mom"--which I was afraid would frighten her, I just murmured, "I don't see her, mama; can you tell me what she looks like?"

    Mama answered, "She's a real pretty dark-haired lady, sitting there in a real pretty white dress. She's smiling at me."

    I looked at the nurse, and she looked at me, and both our eyes were big as saucers.

    I finally just said, "Well, I don't know who she is, mama."

    And my mama just sat calmly---after having previously been VERY agitated (she'd woken up because of a nightmare that she had the clothes out on the clothesline and it was raining; I'd had to raise the blinds and show her it was night to convince her it had just been a dream)---now she was very, VERY calm, just serenely staring at that (to us) empty chair.

    She soon drifted off to a sound sleep and had no more nightmares that night.

    I still to this day wonder "who" it was she saw---for that she truly saw someone, I have no doubt...
    The only "change" I CAN believe in: I Corinthians 15: 51-52!

  10. #10
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    I would have just thought of one. You see 2 FA-18's come over your head and then you see 4 CBU's pop open. Your really screwed then!
    It is not enough to learn from books and from schools. Learn from the trees, and the water, and the animals. Listen and see. To learn from books is to learn only what man knows. To listen and see the world, is to learn from what man forgot.

  11. #11
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    "Yer fooked now, laddie!"

  12. #12
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    Having had the priviledge of being with loved ones as they passed I learned that the "signs" can very with the individual.

    The same is true with the stages of grief, they do not happen in order all the time and may loop back as one contends with going on living without their loved one.

    That was very true for us in the case of our son's passing away.

    For two days before he died it sounded like he was chewing rocks. A very odd sounding grinding of his teeth.

    The freaky part was that once he passed away, for up to an hour later it appear that he was letting out a big sigh. The hospice nurse said that it was his body gases and air in his lungs releasing.

    We were blessed that he was able to pass on at home instead of in the hospital.

    My foster dad had conversations with his long departed gramma and a few hours before he passed on he asked for peaches. He had not eaten anything substantial for the two weeks prior to this. I fed him a large bowl of peaches that the night shift nurse got for him and he had a look of pure joy. After I left for the night he ended up getting all of his I.V.'s lines out, his O2 line off his face and he walked down the hospital hallway calling out for his gramma. The thing is, is that he had not been ambulatory for many months and the fact that he got himself out of bed and down the hall was really not possible.

    I got the call to come quickly to the hospital which was a long drive from our home. As I drove in the middle of the night I ended up listening to a radio show featuring Elvis Presley gospel songs and that is about the time he did pass on.

    Death is like birth, it is a hard, and sometimes a troublesome time yet filled with joy and new beginnings.

  13. #13
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    When I go my kids are going to inherit a lot of strange but sometimes valuable stuff.
    Some people are only alive because there are laws against killing them.

  14. #14
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    Thank you Susan; I sent the link to my DB and DS. Our dad is very close now-he has almost all of the conditions mentioned in that list. This is not unexpected for us. Dad will be 88 next week-he's happy. We're happy for him.
    I'd rather be paranoid, prepped and wrong than be irrationally happy, frivolous and screwed.

  15. #15
    My dad has most of those symptoms as well. The thing is, the doctors have him on so many drugs it's hard to tell what the situation really is.
    If you need something, ask God. If you don't, thank Him.

  16. #16
    I've had the privilege of being there with two loved oned in their final hours and days...with my stepdad, and mother in law....they were both at home for their entire illness. It is an honor and a blessing to be a part of that process no matter how hard at the time, and I'll always remember those last 24 hours and last minutes like it was yesterday. I don't speak of it often, if at all, just because it IS so intensely personal and meaningful. I knew the signs in advance which helped immensely and helped me to be more alert, helpful and ready.

    Thank you for posting

  17. #17
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    My grandfather passed a few months before he turned a 100 years old. He had not been sick, just old. He was living in a nursing home of his choosing and had been there for a little under 10 years. When it was his time he excitedly called all the nurses who had taken care of him into his room to tell them goodbye and to thank them!! Then he passed peacefully. He never suffered or had any of those signs. We were all so happy he left that way.

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Squidpup View Post
    I'm 8 out of 10. I guess I'm only partially dead.

    Me too (sigh)

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Countrymouse View Post
    I know the nurse who sat with my mom while she was dying (over 20 years ago, now) said that -- before it became so common to drug dying patients into unconsciousness--- that she would often hear dying patients testify to seeing "supernatural" things---things that could not be explained away by dementia, drugs, illness, pain, or approaching death.

    One night about a week before my mother's death, she woke up during the night, and after the nurse and I together had given her a drink of water and tended to her needs, and she was settling back to sleep, she suddenly gestured across the room to a folding chair and said, "Who is that?" Thinking she was confused, I said, "You know her, mama, that's your nurse. She's been here every night," to which my mama replied with an impatient toss of her head in the nurse's direction at the side of her bed, "I don't mean her; I mean HER" and she again pointed to the empty folding chair at the FOOT of her bed.

    I felt the small hairs rise on my neck, but I kept my voice low and calm, and instead of saying, "There's no one there, mom"--which I was afraid would frighten her, I just murmured, "I don't see her, mama; can you tell me what she looks like?"

    Mama answered, "She's a real pretty dark-haired lady, sitting there in a real pretty white dress. She's smiling at me."

    I looked at the nurse, and she looked at me, and both our eyes were big as saucers.

    I finally just said, "Well, I don't know who she is, mama."

    And my mama just sat calmly---after having previously been VERY agitated (she'd woken up because of a nightmare that she had the clothes out on the clothesline and it was raining; I'd had to raise the blinds and show her it was night to convince her it had just been a dream)---now she was very, VERY calm, just serenely staring at that (to us) empty chair.

    She soon drifted off to a sound sleep and had no more nightmares that night.

    I still to this day wonder "who" it was she saw
    ---for that she truly saw someone, I have no doubt...
    Many years ago I was 6 months pregnant and was hemorrhaging badly. I was taken to the hospital and put on a gurney then onto a bed in a hospital room. I bled all over the gurney and hospital bed.

    They forgot about me in that room and later, when they walked in, they found
    that I had miscarried in the bed and pretty much bled out. They put large diameter needles in both arms and rapidly pumped me full of blood again.

    I remember regaining consciousness and looking at the end of my bed to see a
    doctor on the left and a doctor on the right, both in white coats. But the guy in the middle in street clothes....I could not figure out who HE was. The only thing I said out loud was "Who is that man!" Then I fell back unconscious. I still wonder who he was.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobby.knight View Post
    F%%% I feel that way everyday..........



  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Countrymouse View Post
    I know the nurse who sat with my mom while she was dying (over 20 years ago, now) said that -- before it became so common to drug dying patients into unconsciousness--- that she would often hear dying patients testify to seeing "supernatural" things---things that could not be explained away by dementia, drugs, illness, pain, or approaching death.

    One night about a week before my mother's death, she woke up during the night, and after the nurse and I together had given her a drink of water and tended to her needs, and she was settling back to sleep, she suddenly gestured across the room to a folding chair and said, "Who is that?" Thinking she was confused, I said, "You know her, mama, that's your nurse. She's been here every night," to which my mama replied with an impatient toss of her head in the nurse's direction at the side of her bed, "I don't mean her; I mean HER" and she again pointed to the empty folding chair at the FOOT of her bed.

    I felt the small hairs rise on my neck, but I kept my voice low and calm, and instead of saying, "There's no one there, mom"--which I was afraid would frighten her, I just murmured, "I don't see her, mama; can you tell me what she looks like?"

    Mama answered, "She's a real pretty dark-haired lady, sitting there in a real pretty white dress. She's smiling at me."

    I looked at the nurse, and she looked at me, and both our eyes were big as saucers.

    I finally just said, "Well, I don't know who she is, mama."

    And my mama just sat calmly---after having previously been VERY agitated (she'd woken up because of a nightmare that she had the clothes out on the clothesline and it was raining; I'd had to raise the blinds and show her it was night to convince her it had just been a dream)---now she was very, VERY calm, just serenely staring at that (to us) empty chair.

    She soon drifted off to a sound sleep and had no more nightmares that night.

    I still to this day wonder "who" it was she saw---for that she truly saw someone, I have no doubt...
    You described almost word for word what happened to me while my father was in the process of dying. He already had moments where he said he saw his deceased father and brother but this time it was at 2:00 am when I went in to see about him and as I came to the door he looked toward me and asked, "Who are you?" I gently said, "It's me Dad." Shaking his head he said "I know you but next to you. "Who are you?" No one was there and he fell asleep before I could ask him to describe the "person."

  22. #22
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    Before he died my grandfather saw childhood friends and called them by name.
    "The budget should be balanced, the Treasury should be refilled, public debt should be reduced, the arrogance of officialdom should be tempered and controlled, and the assistance to foreign lands should be curtailed lest Rome become bankrupt. People must again learn to work, instead of living on public assistance." - Marcus Tullius Cicero (106 BC - 43 BC)

  23. #23
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    DM passed on July 5th after arriving @ her new home with DS on June 21st of this year. She was hospitalized the 26th of June with numerous complaints, spent four days in ICU and lived the final five days in hospice care on hospital grounds. DS is the youngest of six siblings [53] and had no previous experience with caregiving or the onset of death. My DW and I practically lived on the phone for those last nine days, texting & emailing back & forth; using the ten steps provided in OP and preparing DS for what would come next, complete with the clinical terms associated with the dying process.

    DW is an RN and DS was a quick study. She read the IV bags and kept track of changing dosages. By sharing with us the unannounced and subtle changes to Mom's care routine, we were able to prepare her for what would come next. It was a rough time but DS really took the bull by the horns and instead of sitting in helplessness, waiting... she was involved in the process and assisting in the comfort care being provided [we told her to ask for sherbet to place on Mom's tongue when she would no longer eat or drink]. She enjoyed the taste and sensation in a nonverbal way.

    Information is always good but it takes a teachable person, especially one who truly loves the patient and wants only a soft landing for them, to successfully complete the cycle of life in a clinical setting. Both the hospital & hospice care were spot on. They were both surprised and delighted to see the change in DS from the day of admittance to the early morning when Mom yielded her spirit to her Lord and Savior. And yes, she did call for Dad, gone nearly twelve years now. It was a comfort to DS that DM seemed to be reaching out though the veil of fog and confusion to someone and something she knew for a fact was prepared to receive her spirit.
    Last edited by shinerbock; 07-28-2013 at 03:35 PM.

  24. #24
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    What a hard thread to read. Up close and personal these signs are.

    I came into this world with my twin brother. When he passed a few years ago, I felt I should have too. I did in a way I guess.
    "One Shot, Twelve Kills - U.S. Naval Gun Fire Support "

  25. #25
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    Gone From My Sight
    by Henry Van Dyke

    I am standing upon the seashore. A ship, at my side,
    spreads her white sails to the moving breeze and starts
    for the blue ocean. She is an object of beauty and strength.
    I stand and watch her until, at length, she hangs like a speck
    of white cloud just where the sea and sky come to mingle with each other.

    Then, someone at my side says, "There, she is gone"

    Gone where?

    Gone from my sight. That is all. She is just as large in mast,
    hull and spar as she was when she left my side.
    And, she is just as able to bear her load of living freight to her destined port.

    Her diminished size is in me -- not in her.
    And, just at the moment when someone says, "There, she is gone,"
    there are other eyes watching her coming, and other voices
    ready to take up the glad shout, "Here she comes!"

    And that is dying...
    John 3:16
    16 For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.

  26. #26
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    Dear Emily....so happy to see you here! Have a wonderful Sunday. Perhaps the rain will stop? Let us hope so.

  27. #27
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    Hello TB2K,

    Thank you for posting this, NC Susan. I witnessed some of those dying symptoms when a friend passed away 3 weeks ago. She was 92.5 years old; she died within a week of moving over to full time nursing care from assisted living.

    I too would like to share 'dying experiences' (of several of my relatives):

    The first involves my mother's grandmother, who adopted her as a young child. As my mother's 'mom' was dying, she repeated over and over, "can't you hear them singing?"; my mother would respond, "No, I can't. Don't go." My mother said she could hear 'the death rattle'; several hours passed before her mother died. This lady was not on any meds and died at home in my mother's arms.

    My FIL died of lung cancer; he was in a drug induced coma the last 2 weeks of his life; they had removed all IVs so he was basically dying of dehydration. He was on large doses of morphine also. For those two weeks, he just laid there, unconscious...then right before he died, he opened his eyes and said 'look at all of the pretty angels'. My neice (in her thirties) was sleeping in the hospital room that night and witnessed this.

    Before my father died (he was almost 89 - he suffered with congestive heart failure), he would cock his head and look up at the corner of the ceiling and then look back at me with a questioning look on his face...he did this several times. I was too afraid to ask him what he saw. For the two years or so before he died he also saw family/friends that had died and I remember him saying he saw a little girl that he didn't know. He didn't have dementia and wasn't on any new drugs (same drugs for the last few years).

    My father's brother died a couple of years before my father died; his daughter told me about what was happening to her father the week before he died: her father told her that several times he would find himself visiting with some very nice people in a very nice place, and then suddenly there would be a flash of light and he'd be back in the nursing home - he told her he wished this would quit happening as he wanted to stay with the nice people/nice place. Upon examination, his heart doctor told the daughter that her father's pacemake (w/a defibrillator) had shocked him several times in the last week and was burning him and they should disconnect it and let him go. He died the next day, so I assume he went one last time to that very nice place with the very nice people.

    Blessings,

    Chance

  28. #28
    Thanks for the info. I am at this moment experiencing those symptoms mentioned above with a sibling

  29. #29
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    That's pretty much everyday if you're diabetic!
    Everyone has a photographic memory, some just don't have film...

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grammytomany View Post
    Dear Emily....so happy to see you here! Have a wonderful Sunday. Perhaps the rain will stop? Let us hope so.
    Thank you for the kind words. It was a wonderful day. Took the dog for a long walk, cut the lawn, then did some writing. Hope you had a blessed day too.
    John 3:16
    16 For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.

  31. #31
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    I've been with several people when they died. The best ones are the ones that go to sleep and not wake up.

    Stages of Grief/Death. I was a peer counselor for our dept. and helped several cops right after they had shot and killed a suspect or had some similar event that was traumatic.
    The stages on several officers just kept jumping back and forth but they did follow the pattern.

    One officer who struck a drunk pedestrian (it seemed he just stepped into the path of the cruiser at 60 MPH)
    really struck me hard.
    He would start the stages and at the end would start sobbing. It was just him and me walking around and around behind the police station. All I could do was hold him until the sobbing stopped.

    In an hour or two, he had to have gone through those stages easily a half dozen times.
    Finally he became so emotionally spent he was able to just go into that '1000 yard stare'.

    In a way that was good. He was able to at least quit reliving this death.

  32. #32
    My mil who has Alzheimers seems to meet a lot of these symptoms, but I believe many can be attributed to her meds...However, it's nice to have these in a post here.

  33. #33
    It would be in your best interest to divorce yourself from the idea that you live in a free country.

  34. #34
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Sandhills North Carolina
    Posts
    23,954
    Quote Originally Posted by Emily View Post
    Gone From My Sight
    by Henry Van Dyke

    I am standing upon the seashore. A ship, at my side,
    spreads her white sails to the moving breeze and starts
    for the blue ocean. She is an object of beauty and strength.
    I stand and watch her until, at length, she hangs like a speck
    of white cloud just where the sea and sky come to mingle with each other.

    Then, someone at my side says, "There, she is gone"

    Gone where?

    Gone from my sight. That is all. She is just as large in mast,
    hull and spar as she was when she left my side.
    And, she is just as able to bear her load of living freight to her destined port.

    Her diminished size is in me -- not in her.
    And, just at the moment when someone says, "There, she is gone,"
    there are other eyes watching her coming, and other voices
    ready to take up the glad shout, "Here she comes!"

    And that is dying...
    I LOVE THIS........Thank YOU for posting it........

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    not sure
    Posts
    301
    i knew a woman who was dying of cancer-you could smell death around her-it was unsettling.

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