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EDUC Toxoplasma Gondii: Cat Poop Is Home To Life-Threatening Parasites
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  1. #1
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    Toxoplasma Gondii: Cat Poop Is Home To Life-Threatening Parasites

    Toxoplasma Gondii: Cat Poop Is Home To Life-Threatening Parasites


    Posted: 07/10/2013 11:04 am EDT


    link;http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/0...n_3573554.html

    Toxoplasma Gondii Cat Poop .


    Follow:

    Toxoplasma Gondii Cat Poop, Toxoplasma Gondii Cat Feces, Toxoplasma Gondii, Cat Feces, Cat Feces Parasites, Healthy Living News
    .








    2012-07-16-eh_logo.jpg

    By Brett Spiegel

    They may have been worshiped as gods in ancient Egypt, but in today's modern world, cats, and more specifically their poop, may just be another culprit of parasitic disease transmission, an issue that scientists now identify as an ever-growing public health concern, according to new research published today in Trends in Parasitology.

    Furry felines are responsible for more than one million tons of excrement released into the environment annually, and that's just in the U.S., say researchers at The Stanley Medical Research Institute at Johns Hopkins University Medical Center.


    Such feces is known to carry the highly infectious Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) -- a culpable parasite that breeds epidemics of toxoplasmosis that can cause schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, rheumatoid arthritis, and brain cancer among pregnant women, immune-deficent people, and even generally healthy individuals. It could also impact academic performance in children.

    "The accumulation of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts, found in cat feces, may be a much bigger problem than we realize because of their apparent long life and their association with some diseases," said lead researcher E. Fuller Torrey, MD, director of The Stanley Medical Research Institute, in a press release.




    Cats usually contract the parasite as a result of hunting and eating contaminated birds, mice, or other rodents, spreading the parasite further via soil, grass, and water with which they come in contact. Indoor cats have a reduced risk of contracting T. gondii, Dr. Torrey said, but owners should still take extra precaution when cleaning litter boxes. They should also cover sandboxes and wear gloves when gardening as the parasite can live under fingernails.

    Torrey also believes cat owners should heighten their awareness of where their cats are pooping, like backyards and community parks, since younger kids are most susceptible to parasitic infection. Additionally, increased control of strays and wild cats is a major necessity.

    "Cat Poop: Home to Life-Threatening Parasites" originally appeared on Everyday Health.
    JUST A FEW OF MY SIMPLE THOUGHTS


    LAY LOW WAIT LIKE A WOLF IN THE WILD UNTIL THE TIME IS RIGHT

  2. #2
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    Most of us who are cat owners know about this...is why the wives do NOT change the litter box...
    "I must not fear.
    Fear is the mind-killer.
    Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration.
    I will face my fear.
    I will permit it to pass over me and through me.
    And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path.
    Where the fear has gone there will be nothing....only I will remain"

    Frank Herbert "Dune" "Bene Gesserit Anti-Fear Litany"


    http://bluemudpatriot.wordpress.com/

  3. #3
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    I sneak DE in my cats food for these things. She also gets it in her ears for mites. She's an indoor cat though, mites are about the only thing we've had to worry about really.
    "Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable."
    --John F. Kennedy

  4. #4
    I wonder how many dogs get this from the tootsie rolls in the cat's litter box?

  5. #5
    Another hit piece on cats. *sigh*

    Brett Spiegel must have a quota to fill whilst working for Huffpo.

    This type of article has been reported in ad nauseam. V

  6. #6
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    It's not just cats and people that can suffer from Toxoplasma gondii.

    The world's most successful bug hits dolphins

    18:04 02 June 2008 by Catherine Brahic

    How does a parasite found in kitty litter get into whales and dolphins? By hitching a ride down the sewage pipe and into anchovy guts, say researchers.

    Gloeta Massie and Michael Black of California Polytechnic State University say this could explain why one of the most prevalent parasites in humans is now popping up in marine mammals. They presented their findings at the annual meeting of the American Microbiology Society on Monday.

    "Toxoplasma gondii is the most successful protozoan pathogen on the planet," says Michael Grigg of the US National Institutes of Health. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that nearly one in four people aged 12 or older in the US have been infected with the parasite.

    Fatal consequences

    The parasite often goes unnoticed but can kill fetuses if women become infected during pregnancy. It is the third leading cause of death by food poisoning, and can even cause encephalitis - an acute and potentially deadly inflammation of the brain.

    Cats are the primary reservoir: they catch the parasite from eating infected mice or birds. The parasite's eggs are dispersed in the cat's droppings and can infect food that is poorly washed or prepared.

    Over the past decade it has become clear that the problem is not limited to land animals. T. gondii has been found in marine mammals around the world, from seals and sea-otters to walruses and dolphins. Beluga whales have been found dead from encephalitis thought to be caused by the parasite.

    "We don't know whether the problem has always been there, but there is not a marine mammal that we have looked at that is not exposed to some degree," says Grigg. "How it is getting there is the million dollar question."

    Anchovy agents

    Some have suggested that the eggs get into the oceans through sewage, and lab studies have shown that they can accumulate in mussels and oysters. T. gondii has also been found in one mussel that was caught in the wild.

    But for Massie and Black, that does not explain the parasite's infection of marine mammals.

    "Although the research on bivalves is very promising, it does not fully explain the global infestation of T. gondii in marine mammals," says Massie. "Many marine mammals do not eat bivalves nor do they live near areas of freshwater runoff and sewage runoff."

    Based on the global distribution of the parasite, Massie and Black think that anchovies - a major source of food to many marine mammals - may be part of the problem. They point out the anchovies move from estuaries, where they come into contact with sewage efflux, to the open ocean. They also live anywhere from the top layer of the ocean down to the "twilight" boundary, which light from the surface only just manages to reach.

    What's more, anchovies normally eat tiny particles roughly the same size as the T. gondii eggs.

    Experimental infection

    Black and Massie are in the early stages of their study. To check the credibility of their hypothesis, they put northern anchovies (Engraulis mordax) in seawater containing parasite eggs. Later they dissected the fish and looked in the gut tissue for T. gondii DNA.

    The tests were positive, revealing that the fish do indeed filter and accumulate the eggs. When the anchovies were placed in parasite-free water for six to eight hours after infection, the eggs remained in their tissue. This suggests the fish could transport the parasite from infested estuaries to open water.

    "They're doing all the right experiments," says Grigg, but he adds that much remains to be done. For starters, eight hours is probably not enough time for an anchovy to pick up eggs, carry them out to sea and be eaten by a whale.

    It is also important to determine what parasite strain the anchovies can carry. Grigg has identified a new strain, which he has called "type X". Type X is responsible for killing large numbers of Californian sea otters. "We're wondering if it is an emerging line that is poised to sweep the world."

    Grigg's research suggests that the existence of different strains in part explains why T. gondii sometimes kills and other times goes unnoticed.

    "Once we know how it is being transmitted we can try to mitigate the threat," says Grigg. "If we find there are hotspots of transmission we can try to intervene there. If Black is correct and anchovies are being infected downstream of sewage plants, clearly what is being done to treat the waste is not adequate."
    http://www.newscientist.com/article/...l#.Ud3DKd335HM

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by vessie View Post
    Another hit piece on cats. *sigh*

    Brett Spiegel must have a quota to fill whilst working for Huffpo.

    This type of article has been reported in ad nauseam. V

    I know right? It's like they trot this crap out EVERY YEAR over and over again. Tell us something we DON'T know. Oh wait, that would be against the rules.
    The Operative: “The path to peace is paved with corpses. It’s always been so.”

    Malcolm Reynolds: “So me and mine got to lie down and die so you can live in your better world?”

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by FireDance View Post
    I know right? It's like they trot this crap out EVERY YEAR over and over again. Tell us something we DON'T know. Oh wait, that would be against the rules.
    Well in Brett Spiegel's defence, he probably has kids to feed and needs to get some type of article out there to bring in a paycheck. Can't blame him on that but how about an article on dog poop?

    I love dogs and cats equaly and hope he does a piece on dog poop on the shoes and the smell of dog poop drying on the sidewalks on a hot August afternoon on Alki Point. Hahahaha...

    That's one smell and sight I have embedded in my memory as a child at the beach in Seattle! That and Lutefisk 'eat off's' at the Sons of Norway in Ballard where my Norwegian grandma used to haul us kids off too. Aaaak!

    A big *blurf* and Uff-da to that! V

  9. #9
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    This is the first time I have ever heard of this , and I've had cats all my life.
    JUST A FEW OF MY SIMPLE THOUGHTS


    LAY LOW WAIT LIKE A WOLF IN THE WILD UNTIL THE TIME IS RIGHT

  10. #10
    If you are looking for an excuse to get rid or your cat...or convince other people that your hatred of cats is justified...then the first article is the one to promote. If, on the other hand, you want common sense information try this link.

    http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/cat-ca...plasmosis.aspx
    It will give you all the info you need to understand the disease and also provide information that shows toxo should not invoke hysteria in those who are just discovering it's existence. A simple search for "Toxoplasmosis in cats" will provide at least an hour of reading material.

    Willow

    Willow
    "A meow massages the heart." Stewart McMillan

  11. #11
    Did you know that in the US, the main source for Toxoplasmosis is raw meat and unwashed fruits and veggies? No most people don't know this and apparently Brett Spiegle didn't either.

    Also he didn't know that dogs carry it also but that cats are most likely to show clinical symptoms more than dogs? No he didn't know that either and is lazy in his research.

    It is one of the most common parasitic diseases and is known to effect nearly all warm blooded animals including us 'pink hairless monkeys' as my dad used to call us kids (he was going to be a vet but decided there was more money in treating us 'pink hairless monkeys'). V

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by dogmanan View Post
    This is the first time I have ever heard of this , and I've had cats all my life.
    When women receive education about pregnancy via classes, medical counseling, and written materials, they tell all the pregnant women not to change the kitty litter.

  13. #13
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    Where is hatred of cats in any of the preceding posts?

    Medical alerts to pregnant women have been routine for years. That cat litter boxes are potential sources of infection by T. gondii is common knowledge. Those of us that have cats should be taking precautions, not just for ourselves and family but giving some thought to dealing with cat waste generally.

  14. #14
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    People can ALSO get HEARTWORM FROM DOGS but NOT DIRECTLY, A MOSQUITO has to bite the dog then the human.
    It pops up when there is a large population of dogs with untreated heartworm AND a bad mosquito problem.(usually poorer areas.) SO- DON'T get bit by a mosquito while on the "wrong side of town".

    Heartworm Treatment for Humans
    By G.D. Palmer, eHow Contributor

    Heartworm in dogs may cause lethargy, but it produces few symptoms in humans.
    Human heartworm disease is extremely rare. You cannot contract heartworms directly from a dog or cat, even if it's suffering from the parasite. Human heartworms are usually spread via mosquito. Heartworms can't complete their life cycle inside the human body the way they can in dogs and cats, but they can become a real problem. In unusual cases, they may even cause amputation of a body part. Treatment of heartworm in humans depends on the individual case.
    Heartworm Treatment Recovery Heartworm Treatment Protocol

    Symptoms
    While heartworm symptoms in cats and dogs can include fatigue, coughing, blindness, weight loss, digestive trouble and even death, humans rarely present symptoms that indicate a problem. Instead of classic "disease" signs, humans tend to have an immune reaction. As the worms die off inside an organ, the organ forms nodules. These nodules cause pulmonary dirofilariasis, also known as a parasitic pneumonia. If symptoms are present, they include cough, fever and chest pain, but most people show no signs.

    Diagnosis
    Many humans with heartworm or associated problems only find out about their condition as the result of a CT scan or X-ray for another condition. The diagnosis isn't definitive until testing to rule out other problems has been done, though. Human heartworm may look much like cancer or other lesion-causing conditions. If nodules appear on an X-ray, the physician will usually perform a biopsy to determine whether they're cancerous or caused by heartworm.

    Likelihood
    [B]The incidence of heartworm in humans is going down as more dogs get preventative treatment[/B]. People who live in an area where there is a large population of dogs that don't get this treatment are much more likely to get heartworms than people who don't live near dogs or live near treated dogs. This is because heartworm larvae live in the bloodstream of infected dogs and cats. When a mosquito bites one of these animals, then bites a human, heartworms may be transmitted in the mosquito's saliva. Feral animals can contribute to this increase in risk, as well as untreated pets.

    Effects
    Despite the name, human infestations of heartworms do not usually live in the heart. Instead, they often migrate to the lungs, eventually dying and forming cysts. They may also find other areas in the body that have similar conditions. These include the eye and the testicles, though infestations in these areas are much rarer. In serious cases, heartworm may require the removal of the affected body part. The U.S. National Library of Medicine reports one case where orchiectomy -- removal of a testicle -- was required due to heartworm.

    Prognosis
    So far, there are no recorded cases of human death from heartworm infestation. Because humans aren't the preferred host for heartworms, they can't complete their life cycle. Once the worms die, doctors simply treat the secondary conditions caused by the parasite. Complete recovery from heartworm infection is possible and expected.



    Read more: http://www.ehow.com/about_6113060_he...#ixzz2YgQBdYZV
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    Last edited by ainitfunny; 07-10-2013 at 05:37 PM.
    Poison Ivy is still Poison Ivy even if you transplant it into a rose garden and call it a rose.

  15. #15
    As we educated T.B'ers well know, unwashed hands are the biggest spreader of disease in the world and it's amazing the number of people who just can't be bothered, it interrups their itinerary and disrupts their multi-tasking. In this day and age you would think that people would wake up and take that little bit of extra time and have a good scrub and maybe save the lives of themselves and others.

  16. #16
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    Dang! My dogs think that cat turds are "yummy for the tummy"!

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by nharrold View Post
    Dang! My dogs think that cat turds are "yummy for the tummy"!
    You've got some 'turd burglars'! Yummy doggy 'Almond Rocas'! V

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by naturallysweet View Post
    I wonder how many dogs get this from the tootsie rolls in the cat's litter box?
    MMmmm Almond Roca for my Rottweiler...lol

  19. #19
    This type almost killed my sister in the early 70's from a stray cat I brought home.
    Just saying. Had no idea......

  20. #20
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    Cats usually contract the parasite as a result of hunting and eating contaminated birds, mice, or other rodents, spreading the parasite further via soil, grass, and water with which they come in contact.

    Torrey also believes cat owners should heighten their awareness of where their cats are pooping, like backyards and community parks, since younger kids are most susceptible to parasitic infection. Additionally, increased control of strays and wild cats is a major necessity.
    Cats don't invent the parasite from nothing it would appear that birds and rodents are the carriers who are crapping everywhere cats can't begin to reach. Why isn't the piece on rodents and mice infecting cats and humans?

    I heard that you should always wear gloves when cleaning a car with bird poop on it, as the white part has this parasite in it and touching it can infect you. Not sure if it was true but I've always been careful when around that naaahstaay stuff.

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