Check out the TB2K CHATROOM, open 24/7               Configuring Your Preferences for OPTIMAL Viewing
  To access our Email server, CLICK HERE

  If you are unfamiliar with the Guidelines for Posting on TB2K please read them.      ** LINKS PAGE **



*** Help Support TB2K ***
via mail, at TB2K Fund, P.O. Box 71, Coupland, TX, 78615
or


TRANS Cargo Ship Spilting Apart - Photo (UPDATE POST #18 - Carrrying Arms for Syrian Rebels???)
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    The Last Frontier
    Posts
    11,528

    Cargo Ship Spilting Apart - Photo (UPDATE POST #18 - Carrrying Arms for Syrian Rebels???)

    Fair use
    http://www.vesselfinder.com/news/122...RT-June-21-UPD



    MOL COMFORT - June 21, UPDATE
    Posted on Friday 21st of June 2013

    Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, Ltd, the company owner of the MOL Comfort container ship, which broke on 2 parts updates the status of MOL Comfort as of 23:00 JST (18:00 Dubai time) on 20th of June, 2013. The container ship still couldn't continue floating under its own power from 17th of June, 2013 because the hull split off 2 parts while under way on the Indian Ocean.

    MOL COMFORT accident - the aft and fore parts of the container ship MOL Comfort are drifting near 14’10”N 63’27”E and 13’13”N 62’05”E respectively in an east-northeast direction. The weather condition at the site is still rough. The patrol vessel that has departed Port of Jebel Ali, U.A.E. on 19th of June is being expected to arrive at the ocean site on around 24th of June.

    Containers on the MOL Comfort - some of the containers on the damaged container ship MOL Comfort may be lost or damaged during the accident, but majority of the cargo are confirmed to be aboard the fore and aft part.

    There isn't any changes on below items 3 and 4 from the Update released on 20th of June.

    Rescue of the cargo and hulls of MOL Comfort - We have contracted with a salvage company and are proceeding to rescue the cargo and hulls.

    Oil leakage of MOL Comfort - we confirmed no large volume of oil leakage.

    by VesselFinder
    Last edited by Fisher; 06-22-2013 at 11:50 PM.
    ___

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Purdy area, Western WA
    Posts
    22,258
    Does anyone ELSE notice a complete absence of concern or reporting of the condition of the CREW???
    What kind of soul-less money grubbers run that line AND the reporting staff TOO?
    UNFRIGGING BELIEVABLE!!
    Poison Ivy is still Poison Ivy even if you transplant it into a rose garden and call it a rose.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Blair Atholl
    Posts
    5,157
    Quote Originally Posted by ainitfunny View Post
    Does anyone ELSE notice a complete absence of concern or reporting of the condition of the CREW???
    What kind of soul-less money grubbers run that line AND the reporting staff TOO?
    UNFRIGGING BELIEVABLE!!
    The ship is mostly "together", so it's likely that the hull degraded over a period of time. There was probably plenty of opportunity to be sure that all the crew were together on the aft part of the ship. I can see that the "lifeboat" is still in place on the port side of the superstructure, so they haven't had to abandon the ship yet. It's going to suck being the salvage guys that have to shift all those containers off to something else (probably barges) in rough seas though.
    Strike me down, and I shall become more powerful than you can possibly imagine


    Oderint dum metuant

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    955
    I've read two times in the past several years that, on average, two ocean-going container ships are lost every week.
    The country has been conquered and is under occupation. That's a fact. Before you dispute it, gather your facts. Got any?
    "No one in this world, so far as I know, and I have searched the record for years, and employed agents to help me - has ever lost money by underestimating the intelligence of the great masses of the plain people." H.L. Mencken

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    955
    And on a similar note, here's an article that claims that 10,000 shipping containers (not ships) are lost overboard every year.

    http://singularityhub.com/2011/04/05...look-at-one-2/

    That's about one each hour, every day.
    The country has been conquered and is under occupation. That's a fact. Before you dispute it, gather your facts. Got any?
    "No one in this world, so far as I know, and I have searched the record for years, and employed agents to help me - has ever lost money by underestimating the intelligence of the great masses of the plain people." H.L. Mencken

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    955
    Found it!

    "HOW MANY SHIPS ARE LOST AT SEA EVERY YEAR?

    According to statistics published by the Institute of London Underwriters, the number of commercial ships over 500 tons lost due to collision, running aground, sinking, or serious accident (fires) is about 100 per year."

    http://blog.mailasail.com/beezneez/95

    There's the 'two per week' statistic I mentioned above.
    The country has been conquered and is under occupation. That's a fact. Before you dispute it, gather your facts. Got any?
    "No one in this world, so far as I know, and I have searched the record for years, and employed agents to help me - has ever lost money by underestimating the intelligence of the great masses of the plain people." H.L. Mencken

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    OK
    Posts
    4,526
    A fairly comprehensive list of shipping and marine loss for June 2013.




    VESSEL LOSS & NEWS DISPATCHES FOR JUNE 2013


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------




    7,041-TEU container vessel MOL Comfort, with crew of 26, suffered crack / severe structural failure amidships and water ingress off Yemen, while under way from Singapore to Jeddah on the Indian Ocean (12'30"N 60'E) during inclement whether at about noon JST (07:00 local time) on June 17. [17-06-2013] UPDATE>> Vessel is broken into two, both sections still separately afloat and foundering as of sundown June 17. Some containers reported overboard, oil spill reported. [18-06-2013]



    7,085-dwt general cargo vessel Asian Express (IMO 7627728, built 1977), experienced engine trouble en route from Port Bin Qasim, Pakistan, to Maldives, with cargo of sand and cement on June 12. Indian Coast Guard ship Varuna came to assist, but abandoned all attempts to fix the engine because of deteriorating weather conditions. The sea became too rough, when it was decided to evacuate all 22 crew, including 18 Maldivians and 4 Indians, after a crack opened up in the hull. Crew is safe, vessel reportedly, was afloat and drifting with a list. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 17-06-2013]



    3,506-dwt general cargo vessel Maykop (IMO 8230065, built 1973) ran aground in Onezhskoye Lake on June 11. The vessel was loaded with 2,934 tons of gravel. No damages reported, partial off-loading was required to refloat the vessel. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 17-06-2013]



    2,528-gt Norwegian ferry Sogn (IMO 8110980) ran into the ferry dock at Brimnes whilst coming from Bruravik on June 13. There were 43 passengers and a crew of nine aboard. No one was injured. However, the ferry suffered hull damage and sailed to Ulvik. Also the ferry pier was damaged, and Fjord1 was working to survey the damage on both the ferry and the pier. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 17-06-2013]



    15-m Norwegian tug North Tug (CS LG7141; MMSI 25750470) capsized and sank in Kirkenes at a water depth of 60-70-m while assisting the cruise ship Ocean Princess on June 10. The Østfinnmark police was notified of the accident by the Rescue Coordination Centre and all emergency services were dispatched to the location. The crew of two was picked up quickly from the water by some boats in the area and was questioned by Police in Kirkenes. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 17-06-2013]



    26,911-gt Brazilian bulkcarrier Norsul Camocim (IMO 9056387), which had come from Porto de Tubarao carrying a cargo of coal, was in collision with the 63,993-gt Hongkong flagged bulkcarrier Hanjin Odessa (IMO 9539729) on June 7. The latter vessel was moored with a cargo of soybeans at warehouse 39 in the Port of Santos. The Norsul Camocim hit the other vessel and caused a gash of 25 meters in the hull of the ship. Next, the cargo ship also allided with a shiploader, which was damaged too, and part of the equipment fell into the water at warehouse 38. The Norsul Camocim which suffered damage at the port side foreship was berthed at the Usimins terminal at warehouse 32 on order of the Maritime Administration. Experts carried out an inspection of the two vessels and the police launched an investigation. Both vessels were prevented from leaving port. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 17-06-2013]



    2,109-gt tuna fishing vessel Cap Finistere (IMO 8919415, built 1991) -- flag Thailand, manager Pioneer Food Cannery, Ghana -- reported disabled on June 9 at position 02 31S 027 40W, some 500 nautical miles east off Brazilian coast with crew of 31 on board. Cap Finistere, previously named Thai Union 3, was hijacked in autumn 2009 with Russian crew by Somali pirates and released in March 2010 for a ransom. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 17-06-2013]



    98,268-gt Mathilde Maersk (IMO: 9359052) suffered an engine room fire while transiting through the Suez Canal on June 6. The main engine shut down and the ship was no longer able to sail under its own power after the alarm sounded. The fire was quickly extinguished and no one was hurt. A tug has pulled the Mathilde Maersk to the Great Bitter Lake where repairs were started. Cause of the fire has not yet been established. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 10-06-2013]



    252-gt trawler Hemisferio Sul (IMO 8812071, built 1990) reported a fire on board and requiring immediate assistance on June 6. The vessel was some 700-nm west of Sao Miguel island, Azores. MRCC diverted to the distress trawler nearby Spanish fishing vessel Mardani (IMO 9194244), which successfully rescued the 12 crew of the Hemisferio Sul. No injures were reported. The Mardani headed for Horta port, Faial island, Azores, believing that the abandoned Hemisferio Sul sank after burning out. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 10-06-2013]



    9,230-dwt Marshall Islands flagged bitumen tanker Asphalt Carrier (IMO 9293545, built 2010) suffered mechanical problems off New Guinea on June 5. The vessel arrived at Newcastle, Australia, in tow of Svitzer Australia salvage tug Austral Salvor (IMO 8501385). [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 10-06-2013]



    Reefer Heng Sheng Chang 1 suffered fire while docked at Repair Ship Yard Fujian Mawei Shipbuilding, Fuzhou, China, on June 4. A dozen crew and yard workers were evacuated and more than 60 firefighters were deployed. No injures were reported, firefighting was complicated by the presence of some 3 tons of ammonia and 12 tons of hydraulic oil, but the fire was extinguished. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 10-06-2013]



    30,838-dwt Liberia flagged bulk carrier Free Neptune (IMO 9146819, built 1996) collided with 28,451-dwt bulk carrier Da Zi Yun (IMO 9451305, built 2010) off the Noukachott port, Mauritania, Western Africa on June 5. Free Neptune reportedly suffered severe damages with ensuing water ingress. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 10-06-2013]



    4,794-dwt Turkish chemical tanker Firdes (IMO 9317676, built 2005) suffered engine failure en route from Ceuta Spain, to Bilbao, Spain, in the Atlantic on June 5. The vessel was taken under tow of SAR tug Ria de Vigo (Spain, IMO 8311417) to Bilbao, in Bay of Biscay. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 10-06-2013]



    Australian F/V Joseph M (MMSI 503648300) ran aground on the Great Barrier Reef near Lady Elliot Island on June 6. A small diesel leak was caused by the heeling of the vessel. The Trawler was not damaged, and Gladstone Water Police stated minimal damage to the reef. The crew cleaned up the spilled diesel. The area of the grounding was in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Green Zone. Owners of the trawler arranged for a tug from Bundaberg to refloat the trawler in the afternoon, and MSQ were on standby with safety equipment. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 10-06-2013]



    4,639-gt Bahamas flagged, seismic survey vessel Arctic Explorer (IMO 8610667) got stuck at a depth of 7.5 metres after having bunkered fuel 30 meters from the pier at Devold Holmen in Kristiansund on June 5. There were no reports of damages after a ROV of Abyss inspected the ship's bottom. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 10-06-2013]



    33,724-gt Finnfellow (IMO 9145164) suffered fire in the port of Naantali on June 9. The cause of the fire was an overheating in the the ship's air-conditioning. After the fire was out, the decks were ventilated. The Ferry left the port bound for Kapellskärts. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 10-06-2013]



    3,595-dwt general cargo M/V Little Ann (IMO 8230003, built 1972) ran aground in Volga-Baltic Canal en route from Podporzhye to Istanbul with 2130 tons of timber on board on June 3. The vessel was refloated on June 7 an no damages were reported. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 10-06-2013]



    Oil rig Noble Paul Romano tilted on one side during ballasting operations on June 3. No one was injured and no damage was sustained, but it is reported some equipment fell overboard. All crew and workers have been accounted for. The incident was not connected with the repair work being carried out by the shipyard. A witness said there was a commotion as some employees could be heard shouting frantically. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 10-06-2013]



    NTwo PSV were raided by the same gang of Nigerian pirates on June 4, near position 04 14.9N 007 45.7E, Usari Field, Nigeria. It is understood, that the 1,969-gt PSV Bourbon Arethuse (IMO 9344227, built 2008) was the first target, and the 2,197-gt PSV C-Viking (IMO 9640231, built 2012 came second. No details available on C-Viking attack, presumably it went on in the same manner Bourbon Arethuse was raided. According to IMB, pirates boarded Bourbon Arethuse underway, on standby duties. Seeing the pirates the crew raised the alarm, retreated into the citadel, alerted other vessels and shore based office by VHF and waited until the pirates had left. On investigation it was found that the vessel's and crew belongings were stolen. All crew safe. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 10-06-2013]



    The brand new cargo carrier Shri Jayate reported an engine failure while voyaging in heavy rain, and drifted to the shore off Ratnagiri on June 9. Ten crew members were rescued from an the Indian cargo ship. Later, it drifted and was stuck around two km from the coast in the Arabian Sea. With help from fishermen, all the crewmen were safely rescued. The ship was on its way to being delivered to clients in Kolkata. It had begun its journey from Vasai in Thane, and had covered about 250-km at the time the engine failed. There is no report of any environmental hazard because of this incident. Efforts to repair the faulty engines will be taken once the weather improves in the rain-battered Ratnagiri and Konkan region. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 10-06-2013]



    8,378-gt Bahamas flagged cruise ship Hanseatic (IMO 9000168) suffered fire in a separator room on June 9. Three men, two crew members and a guard of the yard suffered smoke intoxication and had to be treated in the hospital. The ship was docked at the SSW Schichau Seebeck Shipyard in Bremerhaven for repair and overhaul works since June 4. The fire broke out during welding works. At that time 120 people were aboard. The fire brigade immediately started to fight the fire while the Police coordinated the evacuation of the ship. The Police Bremerhaven launched an investigation. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 10-06-2013]



    1,059-gt British flagged trawler Wiron 1 - PH 110 (IMO 9117519) suffered engine trouble off Ijmuiden and required tug assistance on June 5. The tug Saturn took the casualty in tow and brought it into the port of Ijmuiden. The tug Pollux assisted as stern tug in the harbour approach. The ship was safely docked. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 07-06-2013]



    Swiss-flagged river cruise ship Swiss Sapphire (EU-No. 07001858) was evacuated by the police in Linz as the ship was in danger of drifting against a bridge on June 3. The height underneath the bridge was only 6.4 meters due to the Danube floodings. The police contacted the master of the 110-m-ship, and it was decided to disembark the 120 passengers using an already flooded gangway. The bridge was closed due to the danger of an allision. When the evacuated ship finally passed underneath the bridge after the crew had removed some deck installations, only 10 centimeters were left. The ship could not remain moored due to the strong currents and rising floods. Only the rapid response had prevented the threat of an allision. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 07-06-2013]



    980-dwt wine tanker Theodoros (IMO 6807333) reported a leak caused by a split tail shaft, and was down by the stern after the engine room flooded on June 4. The ship's crew, two Tunisians and four Egyptians, were hoisted by the Helimer 202 Rescue helicopter on the morning of June 5, which flew them to the offices of the National Police at Almería Airport. The tanker was sailing without cargo from Crete to Nigeria. After the ship was stabilized, it was taken in tow to Almeria on June. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 07-06-2013]



    Spanish F/V Mar Brava sank after a fire 39 miles off Saint Cyprien on June 5. A French F/V saved the crew of three, which had jumped into the sea. They were taken by helicopter to the hospital in Perpignan and treated for hypothermia. The Mar Brava sank in a water depth of 550 meters. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 07-06-2013]



    Dutch fregate Zr. Ms. Holland was involved in a rescue mission in the Caribbean Sea on June 4. Ten crew members were rescued from a sinking container ship. The rescued crew members were transferred to the U.S. Coast Guard. The Holland had intercepted the vessel on suspicion of drug smuggling in cooperation with a Dash-8 patrol aircraft of the Coast Guard. The vessel was suspected of smuggling a large amount of cocaine. While the Holland was shadowing the ship, the captain first reported engine problems, then a flooding in the engine and a raging fire in the stern. Arson by the crew was suspected. They were taken aboard the naval vessel, while the Holland was trying to extinguish the fire and cool the hull. But its crew could not prevent it, and the 55-meter long cargo ship capsized and sank on a water depth of 3,000-4,000 meters. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 07-06-2013]



    24,150-gt Liberian flagged bulkcarrier Long Lucky (IMO 9471654) allided with a reserve lock of the Kiel Canal in Kie-Holtenau when entering the large southern lock enroute Tarragona - Ust-Luga on June 6. The ship had been fueled at the Bominflot bunker Station and had received assistance by the SFK-tug Holtenau for the passage of the locks. Shortly after the ship unmoored, it veered to starboard, narrowly escaping a collision with the canal ferry Adler 1 and finally hit the gate which was berthed at the canal shore. The gate was damaged, and also the bulkcarrier suffered scratches. The tug pulled the ship back into the fairway, and it berthed in the lock around 6 p.m. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 07-06-2013]



    German tug Vincent (EU-No. 06002741) pushing the barge WL 2, allided with the Überseebrücke (Overseas Pier) in Hamburg on June 6. The ship had tried to moor to take a man onboard when the barge hit the pier with its bow. The vessels left again and headed for the Hansa Port. The police boarded the 25-m-tug Vincent in the Southwest Port at the Togo Quay where the master of the tug was breathalyzed. The master had an alcohol Level of 0.93 per thousand, his deckhand 0.69. Blood samples were taken of both and the certificates of the master were kept by the police. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 07-06-2013]



    German charter F/V Wiking, with 17 passengers aboard, suffered engine failure in the fairway of the Kiel Canal on June 2. While the crew was unable to start the engine again, the lifeboat Berlin of the DGzRS station was on scene within short time and took the disabled charter f/v in tow. To get the 24-m-ship into its home port Möltenort the small life boat Walter Rose of the DGRS-station Kiel-Schilksee assisted to pull it through the narrow harbor entrance and safely moor it at the fishing pier. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 07-06-2013]



    Trawler MRTK-1051 (IMO 8878257, built 1978) suffered explosion in shipyard in Svetliy, Kaliningrad region, Baltic sea, on June 3. Diesel fuel fumes exploded during welding work, two crew were seriously injured and taken to hospital. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 07-06-2013]



    43-foot crab and halibut boat Erica Renee began taking on water 20 miles southwest of Kodiak island in the afternoon of June 3. The vessel was listing heavily and was down by the stern after taking on water after its bilge pump shorted out. The crew of the Kennicott assessed the situation and was able to transfer a generator and a pump, which helped to dewater the vessel. After the ship was pumped out, it was able to proceed to nearby Alitak Bay for repairs. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 07-06-2013]



    503-gt Norwegian tug Rallaren (IMO 7325667) drifted aground off a wharf in Osan in Svolvær on June 3. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 07-06-2013]



    17,644-gt Italian tanker Korsaro (IMO 9373137) was found in violation of a sulfur directive in Hamburg on June 3. The ship had moored at berth Rethe Kruse on June 1, coming from Porsgrunn. Officials checked the ship's certificates and investigated the engine room. They found diesel generators and the auxiliary boiler were not converted from a high-sulphurous (within 1 percent sulfur content) to a low-sulfurous fuel (up 0.1 percent) in time. The police took samples for accurate laboratory analysis. The chief engineer from Italy and two engineers had to deposit guarantees of € 10630.50. On June 4 at 9.45 the ship left Hamburg bound for New York. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 07-06-2013]



    German flagged, self propelled barge Guttenberg (EU-No. 04014610) got stuck amid ships on the Neckar on June 3 due to rapidly decreasing water levels following the floods the day before. The ship had been berthed at the Walter Schramm Yard yard for over a week to get a new engine fixed when it grounded on port side and developed a list. The vessel was able to pull off with its main engine. The ship remained in Neckarsteinach until the water levels on the river make it possible to continue. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 07-06-2013]



    97-ft trawler Neahkahnie (MMSI-Nr 367399910) ran aground in Puget Sound on the west side of Whidbey Island near Greenbank on June 4. There were no injuries to the three people aboard and no fuel spill. The Coast Guard responded with a helicopter from Port Angeles and the cutter Swordfish out of Port Townsend to enforce a 600 yard safety-zone. The tug Rosario refloated the 97-foot vessel. Global Diving and Salvage completed an underwater hull inspection of the vessel at approximately and found no damage. The crew of the Coast Guard Cutter Swordfish and the Rosario escorted the Neahkahnie to Pier 91 in Seattle. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 07-06-2013]



    83,850-gt Malta-flagged tanker M/V Profit (IMO 9408683) collided with 29,996-gt Panama flagged cargo M/V Imperial Spirit (IMO 9364801) on May 30. There has been no report of injury or pollution from either vessel; however, both vessels were reporting damage but were in stable condition. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 05-06-2013]



    29,351-gt Norwegian oil rig Island Innovator (IMO 8769731) took on water in Askøy, Hordaland on May 31. 158 people were evacuated, one minor injury reported. The 37 persons still aboard were able to get situation under control, but the platform was not yet stabilized. Divers were sent to patch the leak. The chains holding the platform in place were under considerable strain. Odfjell Drilling, who operate the rig, have obtained anchor handling vessels to assist reducing the load. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 05-06-2013]



    38,489-gt British flagged bulk carrier Ghent Max (IMO 9164641) ran aground on the Elbe off Otterndorf en route Riga-Hamburg on June 2. The tugs Wolf, Bugsier 15, Neuwerk and the Bürgermeister Brauer were sent to assist. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 05-06-2013]



    6,620-gt Swedish roro ferry Birka Exporter (IMO 8820860) suffered engine trouble en route to Norrköping-Travemünde and had to anchor off its destination waiting for a tug to enter port on May 31. On June 1 a tug arrived from Rostock and pulled the ship to the Lehmann Quay where it was safely berthed and the problems were fixed within 24 hours when the ship departed again bound for Hallstavik. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 05-06-2013]



    105,709-dwt Crude oil tanker Minerva Maya (IMO 9233234, built 2002) collided with tug M.L. Crochet which was pushing 5 barges in the Houston Ship Channel on June 2. The tanker was in ballast and suffered a breach in the bow area port side, above the waterline. Barges were damaged, too, but all are stable and were secured shortly after collision. No leak reported, investigation is under way. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 05-06-2013]



    12,746-dwt Antigua-flagged heavy lift cargo vessel BBC Arizona (IMO 9501253, built 2010) suffered fire on May 31 according to Coast Guard Alaska, USA. The cause of the fire was due to ignition of oil leaking from several of the ship’s containers during hot work operations. The ship’s crew extinguished the fire. Maritime Safety personnel noted multiple containers aboard were leaking what appeared to be transformer oil. All leaking oil was contained on the deck of the ship and reportedly does not pose explosive or inhalation hazards. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 05-06-2013]



    9,950-gt car carrier City of Paris (IMO 9174775, built 1999) suffered engine failure in English Canal, then taken in tow by tug Morgawr (IMO 7800045) to Falmouth for repairs. The vessel left Newcastle upon Tyne bound for Santander. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 05-06-2013]



    16,071-gt Prins Joachim suffered fire just before reaching the port of Rostock on June 3. The ferry continued its way into port where all passengers were safely disembarked. One crew member suffered light injuries by inhaling smoke while fighting the fire. After the fire was out, an Investigation was launched, but it was planned that the ferry would start the return trip to Gedser the same evening. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 05-06-2013]



    455-gt Norwegian ferry Lofotferje 1 (IMO No 7034189) broke off the moorings holding it on a slip at the Lofoten Sveiseindustri in Svolvær on June 3, where it was to be pulled ashore. It slid into the water and drifted stern first across the narrow onto the opposite stone embankment. Although the crew was on board there was no chance to gain control of the ferry before it hit the rocks on the other side, narrowly missing a boat. No one was hurt in the incident. [From our Senior Correspondent Tim Schwabedissen, 05-06-2013]


    http://www.cargolaw.com/presentations_casualties.php
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by ainitfunny View Post
    Does anyone ELSE notice a complete absence of concern or reporting of the condition of the CREW???
    What kind of soul-less money grubbers run that line AND the reporting staff TOO?
    UNFRIGGING BELIEVABLE!!
    I work in the international shipping hub of The Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach and have seen the new mindset in regards to accidents including death on the terminals. It is not only the money grubbing employer but the employee who is infected with greed and lack of concern for the other guy's safety.

    Many accidents are speed related (driving the container trucks too fast) and have resulted in collisions where the perpetrator sends the 'other guy' through the windshield only to be run over by another speed jockey who wants to go home twenty minutes early. In my industry, incentive is finish the job-go home early; and the onerous of safety is on the shoulders of every individual who drives over the posted 10 MPH speed limit.

    Twenty years ago if a fatal accident happened a terminal might shut down for an hour while EMT's arrived. These days they will just unroll some yellow & black caution tape and lay a sheet out while traffic roars around at 20-40 MPH in ever other portion of the yard.

    So the next time you hear the employer b!+c#!ng about a 'Port Slow-Down' you have a working knowledge of what the hell their talking about. All that means is my brethren are driving 10 MPH, thereby not doing the daily throw of dice pimping their lives to go home 20 minutes early.

    In many instances the employers are only half to blame. That six or seven hours of NASCAR requires a compliant participant.

    In the case of the vessel pictured, it is the dramatic structural photograph that draws more interest by most people. You know the "if it bleeds it leads" type of story line. 21 people in three deployed life boats isn't as pictorially captivating to the onlooker; hence no survivors storyline.
    Last edited by L.A.B.; 06-22-2013 at 07:00 PM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Little cabin in da big woods.
    Posts
    22,516
    Looks like the ship is overloaded for first glance. Way too much freight being hauled.

    More greed......
    In his heart a man plans his course, but the Lord determines his steps.
    Proverbs 16:9

    Link to IMPAT's fundraiser for a safe car to drive to cancer treatments and local needs.
    http://www.gofundme.com/b1o8x4


  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Owl View Post
    Looks like the ship is overloaded for first glance. Way too much freight being hauled.

    More greed......

    Wise Owl good observation. 25 years ago three high on deck stacking was the norm, now six high is.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    12,779
    I wonder how much "human cargo" is lost during the year due to ship lost or containers getting washed overboard. You would thing that containers holding illegals would be last on and first off making them in the most vulnerable position on the top of the stacks.
    Find my free fiction stories here.

    "Isn’t it interesting that the same people who laugh at science fiction listen to weather forecasts and economists?” - Kelvin R. Throop III

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    9,371
    I think that's one of the mid-sized ones. Per Wikipedia the MOL Comfort (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MOL_Comfort and the page already mentions this event) is rated at 8,110 TEU (TEU is the term they use to describe how many containers a ship can carry), while the largest container ship class now carries 16,020 TEU (CMA CGM Marco Polo - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CMA_CGM_Marco_Polo).

    It's also worth mentioning that as far as I know ALL very big ships cannot be supported only in the middle (that is, an event where both ends of the ship hang out in open air). I think the reverse is also true ... any ship supported only on both ends and not in the middle will also break in half. Fortunately that rarely happens on the open ocean, which is why nobody overbuilds the things.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    NH
    Posts
    19,046
    Must be a Carnival ship.
    You gotta look for the good in the bad
    The happy in the sad
    The gain in the pain
    And what makes you grateful not hateful - K Salonansohn

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Owl View Post
    Looks like the ship is overloaded for first glance. Way too much freight being hauled.

    More greed......
    Wal Mart is getting ready to do that with their 18 wheeler fleet, going to 60 ft trailers and cab over tractors. There is a thread here on TB about it

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    49,755
    Quote Originally Posted by tanstaafl View Post
    I think that's one of the mid-sized ones. Per Wikipedia the MOL Comfort (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MOL_Comfort and the page already mentions this event) is rated at 8,110 TEU (TEU is the term they use to describe how many containers a ship can carry), while the largest container ship class now carries 16,020 TEU (CMA CGM Marco Polo - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CMA_CGM_Marco_Polo).

    It's also worth mentioning that as far as I know ALL very big ships cannot be supported only in the middle (that is, an event where both ends of the ship hang out in open air). I think the reverse is also true ... any ship supported only on both ends and not in the middle will also break in half. Fortunately that rarely happens on the open ocean, which is why nobody overbuilds the things.
    There is a naval architectural referring to a keel "hogging" there the center of the ship will arch upwards and the bow and stern get pushed downwards.

    With ships this large and loaded, the metal fatigue and stresses that could be generated in a bad weather that this isn't a lot more common is a good thing.

    Also this issue is why torpedoes are rigged to go off under the keel of a target vessel. The gas bubble and overpressure caused by the explosion won't support the ship.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    The Last Frontier
    Posts
    11,528
    MOL containership splits in half in Indian Ocean

    Fair use
    http://savannahnow.com/exchange/2013...f-indian-ocean

    Posted: June 20, 2013 - 9:40pm | Updated: June 21, 2013 - 12:09am
    By Mary Carr Mayle

    It happened halfway around the world, but the photo is so compelling I wanted to share it with PortSide readers.

    According to a story in the Indian Express newspaper, the Mitsui O.S.K. Lines container vessel Comfort literally split in two Monday in inclement weather off the coast of Yemen, about 840 miles west of Mumbai.

    The 26-member crew — 12 Russians and 14 Filipinos — was rescued using two life rafts and a life boat, according to the Indian Coast Guard in Mumbai.

    The Coast Guard said the Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre in Mumbai diverted three nearby ships — the Hanjin Bejing, Zim India and Yantian Express — for the rescue operation.

    The 1,036-foot Comfort was Singapore-bound, carrying 4,500 containers from Saudi Arabia.

    The cause of the incident has not been determined. It was also not known what the ship was transporting.

    As of Wednesday, the company reported, the two parts of the vessel were floating stably in the Indian Ocean, still laden with containers and drifting at about 2 knots.

    MOL said it is sending tugboats and a salvage crew to retrieve the hulls and containers.

    On Thursday, MOL said it has started a joint investigation into the incident with Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., the ship’s builder.
    ___

  17. #17
    We seem to have some sort of disconnect here.

    I'm hearing this ship was transporting 4500 containers of US arms to Syria.

    .??????????

  18. #18
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Sandhills North Carolina
    Posts
    23,676
    its either Divine Intervention or the Russians torpedoed that Syrian cargo

    http://redflagnews.com/headlines/div...ore-in-history


    Divine Intervention or Russian Torpedo? Container Ship Carrying U.S. Weapons for Syrian Rebels Splits in Half/Sinks... Reason Unexplained... AMAZING PHOTOS!

    June 22, 2013














    ‘A large fleet named “Mol Comfort” carrying Arms for FSA from the U.S. has crashed in the Indian Ocean as it made its way from Singapore to Jeddah, on board were 4,500 containers loaded with arms for the Syrian rebels’
    ‘MOL Comfort sank due to yet unclear reasons, sailing from Singapore to Jeddah and after that to North Europe, leaving behind hundreds of drifting containers and a huge aftershock hitting liner sector and all of the maritime industry.
    Even the scale of the consequences is hard, impossible, to estimate, not to mention consequences themselves. This is the 1st case in liner sector, when modern ocean-going liner container vessel (built in Japan!) sank in the ocean after breaking in 2 parts, like a poorly built and managed bulk carrier or over aged coaster. Nothing like this ever occurred, and no one believed it was possible, even theoretically. It just could not happen, but still, here it is.’
    H/T Before It's News... and Vessel Finder....

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    The Last Frontier
    Posts
    11,528
    NCSusan,

    Thanks for the interesting update!

    Fisher
    ___

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Northern Idaho
    Posts
    2,387
    I did not think many ships sunk now-a-days.
    I thought it was a big deal to see this one as it goes down.

    Earlier when one of the posters said a couple ships are lost each week
    I thought what is the big deal about reporting this one?

    What are the odds that the ship that is carrying arms to the good el-CIA-Duh
    would happen to sink?

    Coincidences happen far too frequently when it comes to world politics.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts


NOTICE: Timebomb2000 is an Internet forum for discussion of world events and personal disaster preparation. Membership is by request only. The opinions posted do not necessarily represent those of TB2K Incorporated (the owner of this website), the staff or site host. Responsibility for the content of all posts rests solely with the Member making them. Neither TB2K Inc, the Staff nor the site host shall be liable for any content.

All original member content posted on this forum becomes the property of TB2K Inc. for archival and display purposes on the Timebomb2000 website venue. Said content may be removed or edited at staff discretion. The original authors retain all rights to their material outside of the Timebomb2000.com website venue. Publication of any original material from Timebomb2000.com on other websites or venues without permission from TB2K Inc. or the original author is expressly forbidden.



"Timebomb2000", "TB2K" and "Watching the World Tick Away" are Service Mark℠ TB2K, Inc. All Rights Reserved.