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WAR War with N.Korea poses nightmare scenarios
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  1. #1
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    War with N.Korea poses nightmare scenarios

    Article published in 2010.

    Fair use
    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Wa...arios_999.html

    War with N.Korea poses nightmare scenarios
    by Staff Writers
    Washington (AFP) Nov 24, 2010

    A full-blown war on the Korean peninsula offers up a nightmare scenario that would cause appalling casualties and potentially trigger a nuclear exchange, experts and former officials say.

    The crisis provoked by North Korea's artillery attack on a South Korean island this week makes the prospect of an all-out conflict look less remote, and US officials -- mindful of the high-stakes -- have carefully avoided talk of military action.

    With an array of artillery trained on Seoul, North Korea could easily blast the glass towers of the South's booming capital for days and kill huge numbers of civilians before US and South Korean forces prevailed, experts said.

    "Official Pentagon models assume it would take months to win the war at a cost approaching one million casualties or more, all told, including dead and wounded," Michael O'Hanlon, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, told AFP.

    "And that's without nuclear weapons being used," said O'Hanlon, who wrote a book looking at the effects of a potential war.

    US and allied military planners have long believed that the North would be overwhelmed in a conventional war, but they worry how Pyongyang would use its arsenal of chemical and biological weapons, as well as its small cache of atomic bombs, said Bruce Bennett, a senior defense analyst at the Rand Corporation.

    "The key question is whether or not they can use their WMD (weapons of mass destruction) effectively," Bennett said. "That's the part which we don't really know."

    Bennett and some other analysts say North Korea likely will have the ability to fit a nuclear warhead onto one of its missiles within months, and may already have succeeded.

    In the first hours and days of a conflict, US warplanes would be focused on taking out nuclear sites, missiles and chemical weapons before the North Koreans had a chance to use them.

    Under one war game played out in 2005 by The Atlantic magazine, former military officers and officials concluded that US fighter aircraft would have to carry out up to 4,000 sorties a day to prevent a WMD catastrophe for Seoul and the region.

    South Korea has said it believes the North has about 100 nuclear facilities, but in the event of a war, Pyongyang would likely move weapons and atomic material to other locations, including a vast network of underground sites, Bennett said.

    "We may not have surveillance that's adequate over all of North Korea in time to monitor where things get moved to," he said.

    If the North chose to fire chemical shells into Seoul or strike at air fields with special forces armed with biological weapons, it would run the risk of a massive retaliation from the US military -- raising the danger of the world's first nuclear war.

    A more likely scenario might have North Korea carrying out a "demonstration" launch of a nuclear weapon, perhaps off the South Korean coast, in a bid to discourage an invasion by superior US and allied forces, O'Hanlon said.

    "Using one nuke as a demonstration shot and then withholding others to deter a counter-invasion could be a useful strategy for them," he said.

    Fears over the consequences of North Korea armed with working nuclear missiles have led some to call for preemptive strikes.

    In 2006, former US defense secretary William Perry, and Ashton Carter, now the head of arms purchases at the Pentagon, argued for launching such a preemptive attack to prevent the North from carrying out a ballistic missile test.

    A retired US colonel, John Collins, in 2003 examined a whole series of military options and scenarios with North Korea -- ranging from naval blockades to nuclear strikes -- and reached a grim conclusion.

    "Any of the US options described above could trigger uncontrollable escalation that would create appalling casualties on both sides of the DMZ and promise a Pyrrhic victory at best," he said.
    ___

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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by twincougars View Post
    Nov 24, 2010 in case it wasn't noticed.
    I noted that above the Link at the top.

    Still a relevant article though.
    ___

  4. #4
    A load of rubbish. Only read a bit. First off North Korea would get a very limited number of hours of laying a big gun barrage onto Seoul. South Korea and American forces would be activated within a few hours at most. I would say within the hour.

    Only one million losers in Seoul? The place has about 12 million in population. It will be one hell of a war when it starts.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by China Connection View Post
    A load of rubbish. Only read a bit. First off North Korea would get a very limited number of hours of laying a big gun barrage onto Seoul. South Korea and American forces would be activated within a few hours at most. I would say within the hour.

    Only one million losers in Seoul? The place has about 12 million in population. It will be one hell of a war when it starts.
    China Connection.

    I have never been to Seoul, but I assume that there are civilian defence shelters?

    I would be interested to know if you hear of civilians being asked to leave the capital and travel south.

    NW

  6. #6
    I am currently living in China. I have however lived in South Korea for eight and a half years. Leaving Seoul for where? It is like Japan with the power station stuff. A whole lot of people without jobs needing somewhere to live with food thrown in. It is not a simple thing.

    Civilian defense shelters? As far as I know underground shopping malls and subways is as close as you are going to get to somewhere to shelter. Just think of 12,000,000 people with just a few main roads out of the city if war starts and you have the picture.

  7. #7
    Just like I thought!


    .................................................. ...

    What to do when the shells hit Seoul
    JoonAng Daily ^ | December 10, 2010 | Cho Kang-su, Choi Joon-ho

    Posted on Friday, December 10, 2010 9:02:24 AM by Pan_Yan

    Like most Seoulites, Hong Jin-ah, a 27-year-old graduate student, had never given a second thought to a North Korean invasion. Despite the rogue country’s close proximity to Seoul, most people here have grown deaf to the threat it poses.

    But after Pyongyang leveled Yeonpyeong Island on Nov. 23 with dozens of artillery blasts, many here are now making contingency plans.

    Hong was stumped when she considered where she would go if a war broke out. She turned to her smartphone for an answer. Her search for bomb shelters in Hapjeong-dong, western Seoul, turned up nothing. Next she checked a blog called “Find a Bomb Shelter in Your Town,” which also yielded little help.

    Hong then took her search to the Dasan 120 Seoul Call Center, a citywide information hotline. “I live in Hapjeong-dong. Where should I evacuate to if there is a war?” Hong asked the receptionist. The answer she received was what most people already know: Head to the nearest subway station or basement.

    ...

    There are 25,000 emergency evacuation facilities in South Korea and 3,919 in Seoul. There are no public air-raid shelters in the capital.

    “Unlike on Yeonpyeong Island, there is no need to build extra air-raid shelters in Seoul, since subway stations and basements under large buildings can act as evacuation shelters,” said Kim Hye-kyung, the Seoul civil defense attache. “In the case of air raids by North Koreans, those shelters [in Seoul] are good for two to 10 hours.”

    According to the National Emergency Management Agency, there is enough space in Seoul’s underground facilities (subway stations, basements, etc.) for 2.7 times the city’s population. The agency came to the conclusion by calculating that each person would need 0.825 square meters (8.9 square feet).

    “To prepare for war, the Park Chung Hee regime encouraged construction companies to build basements when putting up new buildings,” said Yoon Myung-o, professor in the University of Seoul’s Department of Architectural Engineering. “Since then, most buildings were made with basements. Now, Seoul has more underground space than any other city [in Korea].”

    Seoul’s 4,000 shelters are scored on a 1-4 grading system (with 1 being the most protective shelters), which is determined by landlords and local government offices. In Seoul, there are 1,481 “grade 2” evacuation shelters - which are largely tunnels, subway stations and basements of buildings. There are 2,246 “grade 3” shelters, which are basements of commercial buildings and underground roads. There are 192 “grade 4” shelters under smaller buildings. There are no public “grade 1” shelters that can withstand a chemical, biological or nuclear attack in the capital.

    According to guidelines from the National Emergency Management Agency, shelters considered “grade 1” must be equipped with enough food and water for at least two weeks, generators, and communications equipment.

    ...

    A go-bag is an easy-to-carry kit that’s been prepared in advance consisting of essential living items. It is common to have a go-bag for those who live in areas prone to natural disasters such as tsunamis.

    It is also not a bad idea to pack a go-bag if your neighboring country is run by a tyrannical dictator who routinely threatens to turn the streets of your capital into “rivers of blood.”

    So, what to pack?

    Start with the essentials: Food, shelter, communication.

    Pack a mylar blanket. It’s light-weight, inexpensive and can fold to fit into your pocket. Also consider a radio, whistle, pocket knife, U.S. dollars, maps, a compass, water, food, personal hygiene products, prescription medication, extra keys to your vehicle or apartment, and your ID and passport.

    http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2640374/posts

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by China Connection View Post
    Just like I thought!


    .................................................. ...

    What to do when the shells hit Seoul
    JoonAng Daily ^ | December 10, 2010 | Cho Kang-su, Choi Joon-ho

    Posted on Friday, December 10, 2010 9:02:24 AM by Pan_Yan

    Like most Seoulites, Hong Jin-ah, a 27-year-old graduate student, had never given a second thought to a North Korean invasion. Despite the rogue country’s close proximity to Seoul, most people here have grown deaf to the threat it poses.

    But after Pyongyang leveled Yeonpyeong Island on Nov. 23 with dozens of artillery blasts, many here are now making contingency plans.

    Hong was stumped when she considered where she would go if a war broke out. She turned to her smartphone for an answer. Her search for bomb shelters in Hapjeong-dong, western Seoul, turned up nothing. Next she checked a blog called “Find a Bomb Shelter in Your Town,” which also yielded little help.

    Hong then took her search to the Dasan 120 Seoul Call Center, a citywide information hotline. “I live in Hapjeong-dong. Where should I evacuate to if there is a war?” Hong asked the receptionist. The answer she received was what most people already know: Head to the nearest subway station or basement.

    ...

    There are 25,000 emergency evacuation facilities in South Korea and 3,919 in Seoul. There are no public air-raid shelters in the capital.

    “Unlike on Yeonpyeong Island, there is no need to build extra air-raid shelters in Seoul, since subway stations and basements under large buildings can act as evacuation shelters,” said Kim Hye-kyung, the Seoul civil defense attache. “In the case of air raids by North Koreans, those shelters [in Seoul] are good for two to 10 hours.”

    According to the National Emergency Management Agency, there is enough space in Seoul’s underground facilities (subway stations, basements, etc.) for 2.7 times the city’s population. The agency came to the conclusion by calculating that each person would need 0.825 square meters (8.9 square feet).

    “To prepare for war, the Park Chung Hee regime encouraged construction companies to build basements when putting up new buildings,” said Yoon Myung-o, professor in the University of Seoul’s Department of Architectural Engineering. “Since then, most buildings were made with basements. Now, Seoul has more underground space than any other city [in Korea].”

    Seoul’s 4,000 shelters are scored on a 1-4 grading system (with 1 being the most protective shelters), which is determined by landlords and local government offices. In Seoul, there are 1,481 “grade 2” evacuation shelters - which are largely tunnels, subway stations and basements of buildings. There are 2,246 “grade 3” shelters, which are basements of commercial buildings and underground roads. There are 192 “grade 4” shelters under smaller buildings. There are no public “grade 1” shelters that can withstand a chemical, biological or nuclear attack in the capital.

    According to guidelines from the National Emergency Management Agency, shelters considered “grade 1” must be equipped with enough food and water for at least two weeks, generators, and communications equipment.

    ...

    A go-bag is an easy-to-carry kit that’s been prepared in advance consisting of essential living items. It is common to have a go-bag for those who live in areas prone to natural disasters such as tsunamis.

    It is also not a bad idea to pack a go-bag if your neighboring country is run by a tyrannical dictator who routinely threatens to turn the streets of your capital into “rivers of blood.”

    So, what to pack?

    Start with the essentials: Food, shelter, communication.

    Pack a mylar blanket. It’s light-weight, inexpensive and can fold to fit into your pocket. Also consider a radio, whistle, pocket knife, U.S. dollars, maps, a compass, water, food, personal hygiene products, prescription medication, extra keys to your vehicle or apartment, and your ID and passport.

    http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2640374/posts
    "There are 25,000 emergency evacuation facilities in South Korea and 3,919 in Seoul. There are no public air-raid shelters in the capital"

    Well, it is Saturday there now, the DMZ is only a short distance from Seoul, my guess it that as we get closer to Monday in Korea, the panic levels will rise.

    NW

  9. #9
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    First off North Korea would get a very limited number of hours of laying a big gun barrage onto Seoul. South Korea and American forces would be activated within a few hours at most. I would say within the hour.

    In that short time over 1 million artillery shells would rain down upon Seol.
    Then the Americna military and Korean's on the DMZ would be overrun and wiped out.
    The whole conventional defense strategy is based upon delay tactics--IE: there are bridges choke points what are designed to collapse and so on.
    No substantial conventional forces could be deployed there for some time.
    Naval air units could arrive shortly there after, but these ships would be swarmed with ship killing missiles--it will not be like it was in the 50's when the USA had command of the seas surrounding the Korean penninsula.

    Let's hope CNN sends Wolf Blitzer to Seol when it happens.
    I'd like to see him turned into "pink mist" by a commie shell when he is atop a tall building doing a live report--one can only wish!

    If things went nuclear--then it would be a different story.
    NK would be glassed by sub based launches and cruise missile attacks by stealth bombers.
    Of course Seol would get glassed, as well as some Japanese cities.
    Who knows what China would do if things went nuclear... but I'd head out of town for a few days just in case.
    "The evil genius always wins"

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Shinmen Takezo View Post
    First off North Korea would get a very limited number of hours of laying a big gun barrage onto Seoul. South Korea and American forces would be activated within a few hours at most. I would say within the hour.

    In that short time over 1 million artillery shells would rain down upon Seol.
    Then the Americna military and Korean's on the DMZ would be overrun and wiped out.
    The whole conventional defense strategy is based upon delay tactics--IE: there are bridges choke points what are designed to collapse and so on.
    No substantial conventional forces could be deployed there for some time.
    Naval air units could arrive shortly there after, but these ships would be swarmed with ship killing missiles--it will not be like it was in the 50's when the USA had command of the seas surrounding the Korean penninsula.

    Let's hope CNN sends Wolf Blitzer to Seol when it happens.
    I'd like to see him turned into "pink mist" by a commie shell when he is atop a tall building doing a live report--one can only wish!

    If things went nuclear--then it would be a different story.
    NK would be glassed by sub based launches and cruise missile attacks by stealth bombers.
    Of course Seol would get glassed, as well as some Japanese cities.
    Who knows what China would do if things went nuclear... but I'd head out of town for a few days just in case.
    Shinmen Takezo,

    I agree that it is very likely that the Americna military and Korean's on the DMZ would be overrun and wiped out.

    "No substantial conventional forces could be deployed there for some time", OK that is also very likely.

    As for going nuclear? Who will go first? Will Obamba allow 28,000 US troops to be wiped out, that is the question?

    Does the US general in command have the authority to use nukes? or is it like the Normandy invasion, with German generals waiting for the authority to use tanks?

    NW

  11. #11
    Bush I withdrew all overseas deployed nukes, including those in South Korea, in '91. Bush II, at some pont, I forget when, verified that the US did not have any there. Largely immaterial, as nukes can be there in the time it takes a B-2 to fly there from Guam, or a Trident to be launched.

  12. #12
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    As I understand it Barry the Nuttless the 1st has YET to remove the authorization from theatre commanders.

    If ha HAS then we're looking at the biggest Benghazi Moment ever, with 25+K troops enduring their own Tyrone Woods moment...


    ["DAMMIT they ain't EVER coming!!"]

    Thanks Archetype.
    Looks like we get to watch 25+K Tyrone Woodses go with the Chief Post Turtle hiding.

  13. #13
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    i have a relative that is part of a group that plans for these scenarios. It is not as if they don't have "games" already played out in anticipation. She's leaving today for SK and doesn't seem worried when I mention NK.
    God is pro-life!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maryh View Post
    i have a relative that is part of a group that plans for these scenarios. It is not as if they don't have "games" already played out in anticipation. She's leaving today for SK and doesn't seem worried when I mention NK.
    Ma'am, with all due respect, if she were I I wouldn't let on to ANYONE in my family if there were concerns...
    Prayers for you and she.

  15. #15
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    Thank you Night Driver. I have spent many yrs. praying for her safety. My son also has many friends from college who live in Seoul and hasn't heard a thing about this from them. It makes you wonder. Are they too complacent or are the newscasters cranking this up?
    God is pro-life!

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shinmen Takezo View Post
    First off North Korea would get a very limited number of hours of laying a big gun barrage onto Seoul. South Korea and American forces would be activated within a few hours at most. I would say within the hour.

    In that short time over 1 million artillery shells would rain down upon Seol.
    Then the Americna military and Korean's on the DMZ would be overrun and wiped out.
    The whole conventional defense strategy is based upon delay tactics--IE: there are bridges choke points what are designed to collapse and so on.
    No substantial conventional forces could be deployed there for some time.
    Naval air units could arrive shortly there after, but these ships would be swarmed with ship killing missiles--it will not be like it was in the 50's when the USA had command of the seas surrounding the Korean penninsula.

    Let's hope CNN sends Wolf Blitzer to Seol when it happens.
    I'd like to see him turned into "pink mist" by a commie shell when he is atop a tall building doing a live report--one can only wish!

    If things went nuclear--then it would be a different story.
    NK would be glassed by sub based launches and cruise missile attacks by stealth bombers.
    Of course Seol would get glassed, as well as some Japanese cities.
    Who knows what China would do if things went nuclear... but I'd head out of town for a few days just in case.
    Informative analysis, ST. Thanks also for your frequent snippits of humour - keeps my head from exploding. Just finished reading the thread on Australia - sort of a regional threat assessment for them re their neighbours. We're running out of safe places!

  17. #17
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    I don't want to take this thread way off course, but I have a question that goes in a slightly different direction.

    I know very little about these things , so feel free to blow me out of the saddle if you wish.

    The North Korean's have threatened to attack the United States again.

    The North Korean's have both missle technology and nuclear technology.

    What's your thought's on them using their technology on us in the form of an EMP strike?
    Could they get a missle out of their country and launch it off shore of the US. Do we have anything that would stop a missle once it was launched and up to speed and altitude? How about an EMP over Seol?

    Just kind of curious.
    ‎"Always vote for principle, though you may vote alone, and you may cherish the

    sweetest reflection that your vote is never lost." ~ John Quincy Adams

  18. #18
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    Can we just evacuate all American personel from South Korea, give them some nukes so they can tell North Korea to piss off and call it good?
    America will never be destroyed from the outside. If we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves.
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stonewall View Post

    What's your thought's on them using their technology on us in the form of an EMP strike?


    Just kind of curious.
    They don't have THAT kind of technology to pull that off. It's been discussed ad nauseum.

    It takes a particular explosion, at a particular altitude, at a particular longitude, and probably several of them happening within fractions of a second of each other.

    I wouldn't loose any sleep over this particular scenario.
    " 'cause we'll put a boot up your ass, it's the American way".

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  20. #20
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    I wouldn't lose any sleep over any of it. The ping-pong dongs would most likely succeed in blowing themselves up if they tried to launch a nuke or anything else.
    Every Time History Repeats Itself The Price Goes Up.

  21. #21
    There is no need to evacuate anyone from the theater of operations in North Korea. Like just before the war in Iraq, we had hundreds of thousands, close to or over a million personal in harms way. There has been a generational advancement in warfare technology since then.

    I'd say we surface 4 tridents and launch a strike to decapitate the command and control structure while simultaneously flying in the stealth fighters and bombers along with B52's to drop 10's of thousands of satellite guided bombs at a time and within a few hours, nothing the Norks could do would make a difference in the outcome.

    Done and over in a day or two. I think it's more about what to do when it's over. It's not that we can't destroy their military, it's about coming in and saving the innocent survivors when it's over.
    "If the control of the economy is not in the hands of the majority of Americans then neither is political control."

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by energy_wave View Post
    There is no need to evacuate anyone from the theater of operations in North Korea. Like just before the war in Iraq, we had hundreds of thousands, close to or over a million personal in harms way. There has been a generational advancement in warfare technology since then.

    I'd say we surface 4 tridents and launch a strike to decapitate the command and control structure while simultaneously flying in the stealth fighters and bombers along with B52's to drop 10's of thousands of satellite guided bombs at a time and within a few hours, nothing the Norks could do would make a difference in the outcome.

    Done and over in a day or two. I think it's more about what to do when it's over. It's not that we can't destroy their military, it's about coming in and saving the innocent survivors when it's over.
    I DON'T THINK SO. The North Koreans are dug deep into the mountains of the Korean Peninsula. They have hundreds of miles of tunnels, which are hundreds of feet below ground. Those tunnels are filled with food, ammo, and other essentials that their army will need to fight. The civilian population, more than likely, will be sacrificed.

    Secondly, most folks assume that an EMP on CONUS would be a nuclear event. Unfortunately, modern science has gone above and beyond the primitive nuke explosion high in the atmosphere. Here's the latest advance in EMP warfare.

    High-power microwave (HPM) / E-Bomb

    High-power microwave (HPM) sources have been under investigation for several years as potential weapons for a variety of combat, sabotage, and terrorist applications. Due to classification restrictions, details of this work are relatively unknown outside the military community and its contractors. A key point to recognize is the insidious nature of HPM. Due to the gigahertz-band frequencies (4 to 20 GHz) involved, HPM has the capability to penetrate not only radio front-ends, but also the most minute shielding penetrations throughout the equipment. At sufficiently high levels, as discussed, the potential exists for significant damage to devices and circuits. For these reasons, HPM should be of interest to the broad spectrum of EMC practitioners.

    Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) and High Powered Microwave (HMP) Weapons offer a significant capability against electronic equipment susceptible to damage by transient power surges. This weapon generates a very short, intense energy pulse producing a transient surge of thousands of volts that kills semiconductor devices. The conventional EMP and HMP weapons can disable non-shielded electronic devices including practically any modern electronic device within the effective range of the weapon.

    The effectiveness of an EMP device is determined by the power generated and the characteristic of the pulse. The shorter pulse wave forms, such as microwaves, are far more effective against electronic equipment and more difficult to harden against. Current efforts focus on converting the energy from an explosive munitions to supply the electromagnetic pulse. This method produces significant levels of directionally focused electromagnetic energy.

    Future advances may provide the compactness needed to weaponize the capability in a bomb or missile warhead. Currently, the radius of the weapon is not as great as nuclear EMP effects. Open literature sources indicate that effective radii of "hundreds of meters or more" are possible. EMP and HPM devices can disable a large variety of military or infrastructure equipment over a relatively broad area. This can be useful for dispersed targets.

    A difficulty is determining the appropriate level of energy to achieve the desired effects. This will require detailed knowledge of the target equipment and the environment (walls, buildings). The obvious counter-measure is the shielding or hardening of electronic equipment. Currently, only critical military equipment is hardened e.g., strategic command and control systems. Hardening of existing equipment is difficult and adds significant weight and expense. As a result, a large variety of commercial and military equipment will be susceptible to this type of attack.

    The US Navy reportedly used a new class of highly secret, non-nuclear electromagnetic pulse warheads during the opening hours of the Persian Gulf War to disrupt and destroy Iraqi electronics systems. The warheads converted the energy of a conventional explosion into a pulse of radio energy. The effect of the microwave attacks on Iraqi air defense and headquarters was difficult to determine because the effects of the HPM blasts were obscured by continuous jamming, the use of stealthy F-117 aircraft, and the destruction of Iraq's electrical grid. The warheads used during the Gulf War were experimental warheads, not standard weapons deployed with fielded forces.

    Col. William G. Heckathorn, commander of the Phillips Research Site and the deputy director of the Directed Energy Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory, was presented the Legion of Merit medal during special retirement ceremonies in May 1998. In a citation accompanying the medal, Col. Heckathorn was praised for having provided superior vision, leadership, and direct guidance that resulted in the first high-power microwave weapon prototypes delivered to the warfighter. The citation noted that "Col. Heckathorn united all directed energy development within Army, Navy and Air Force, which resulted in an efficient, focused, warfighter-oriented tri-service research program." In December of 1994 he came to Kirtland to become the director of the Advanced Weapons and Survivability Directorate at the Phillips Laboratory. Last year he became the commander of the Phillips Laboratory while still acting as the director of the Advanced Weapons and Survivability Directorate.

    As with a conventional munition, a microwave munition is a "single shot" munition that has a similar blast and fragmentation radius. However, while the explosion produces a blast, the primary mission is to generate the energy that powers the microwave device. Thus, for a microwave munition, the primary kill mechanism is the microwave energy, which greatly increases the radius and the footprint by, in some cases, several orders of magnitude. For example, a 2000-pound microwave munition will have a minimum radius of approximately 200 meters, or footprint of approximately 126,000 square meters.

    Studies have examined the incorporation of a high power microwave weapon into the weapons bay of a conceptual uninhabited combat aerial vehicle. The CONOPS, electromagnetic compatibility and hardening (to avoid a self-kill), power requirements and potential power supplies, and antenna characteristics have been analyzed. Extensive simulations of potential antennas have been performed. The simulations examined the influence of the aircraft structure on the antenna patterns and the levels of leakage through apertures in the weapons bay. Other investigations examined issues concerning the electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of composite aircraft structures.

    Collateral damage from E-bombs is dependent on the size and design of the specific bomb. An E-bomb that utilizes explosive power to obtain its damaging microwaves will result in typical blast and shrapnel damage. Ideally, an E-Bomb would be designed to minimize and dissipate most of the mechanical collateral damage. Human exposure to microwave radiation is hazardous within several meters of the epicenter. However, there is a relatively low risk of bodily damage at further distances.

    Any non-military electronics within range of the E-bomb that have not been protected have a high probability of being damaged or destroyed. The best way to defend against E-bomb attack is to destroy the platform or delivery vehicle in which the E-bomb resides. Another method of protection is to keep all essential electronics within an electrically conductive enclosure, called a Faraday cage. This prevents the damaging electromagentic field from interacting with vital equipment. The problem with Faraday cages is that most vital equipment needs to be in contact with the outside world. This contact point can allow the electromagentic field to enter the cage, which ultimately renders the enclosure useless. There are ways to protect against these Faraday cage flaws, but the fact remains that this is a dangerous weakpoint. In most circumstances E-bombs are categorized as 'non-lethal weapons' because of the minimal collateral damage they create. The E-bomb's 'non-lethal' categorization gives military commanders more politically-friendly options to choose from.




    Therefore, an orbiting satellite, could eject missiles with E bomb technology on to any place on earth.
    Sow the Wind....Reap the Whirlwind

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    19,209
    Furthermore, don't assume that the North Koreans haven't spread out their hardware on a worldwide scale.
    They could have equipment in the middle east OR even off the coast of CONUS. Remember, they have a huge sub fleet. The fleet is comprised of many very small craft. These craft are hard to detect, and may be armed with mini cruise missiles.

    In the coming war, the world will be a battlefield. There will be no safe areas. M.A.D. will be enforce on every continent, if this thing gets out of hand.

    NOTE: It is my understanding that many anti-ship cruise missiles already have E bomb technology built into their circuitry. The E bomb disables the ship's defenses, BEFORE, the missile hits.



    Supposed picture of a North Korean infiltration tunnel, which has been dug into S. Korean territory.

    The North Koreans more than likely would use these tunnels to send troops dressed as South Korean military into enemy territory, in order to confuse the enemy, and cause suspicion amongst the troops.
    Last edited by doctor_fungcool; 03-08-2013 at 07:38 PM.
    Sow the Wind....Reap the Whirlwind

  24. #24
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Cleveland OH looking towards TX wistfully
    Posts
    38,050
    MAryH, consider this:
    Raymond Pritchett @Galrahn 2h North Korean public transportation, buses and trains, is being outfitted with camouflage netting in war prep. They did that last in 1993.



    Raymond Pritchett @Galrahn 2h RT @barbarastarrcnn: @DeptofDefense and Intel step up #NorthKorea surveillance in wake of Kim's rising threats @natlsecuritycnn



    Raymond Pritchett @Galrahn 2h With no Armistice, South Korea has no choice but to adjust DMZ ROE, right? Politically, they can't pretend this isn't happening, can they?



    Raymond Pritchett @Galrahn 29m I am uncomfortable with how predictable the US response has been to North Korean threats. This is playing out how they would have gamed it.
    Galrhan is SERIOUSLY "aware" and VERY well wired...and also TYPICALLY difficult to flap...

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    2,132
    I guess we'll just have to wait and see. Daughter is on the plane now heading over to be part of Key Resolve. I know she keeps track of things going on over there, has been there several times and from what I could tell on the phone today, she's not upset and definitely making her summer plans. I pray it is just bluster and posturing. Also son's friends in Seoul are not getting bent out of shape. They want him to come over and visit. These are just two different views being presented here.
    God is pro-life!

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    The Last Frontier
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    11,313
    Quote Originally Posted by doctor_fungcool View Post
    Furthermore, don't assume that the North Koreans haven't spread out their hardware on a worldwide scale.
    They could have equipment in the middle east OR even off the coast of CONUS. Remember, they have a huge sub fleet. The fleet is comprised of many very small craft. These craft are hard to detect, and may be armed with mini cruise missiles.
    Mystery missile launch off California coast: Comes from submarine?

    Fair use
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7AMdHBgHtNE

    Uploaded on Nov 10, 2010

    A mysterious missile was spotted off the coast of Los Angeles and the US military claims it has no idea where it came from. A helicopter from the Los Angeles CBS News affiliate captured images of what appears to be some sort of rocket or missile with a large contrail behind it.It appears to have been launched about 35 miles (56 km) off the coast of Los Angeles, California. There are several military bases in Southern California, but so far none have said there were any launches at that time. The US Navy has said they are not responsible and the Pentagon is still investigating where the mystery missile came from.

    ___

  27. #27
    The problem is most just think it is another sound off by North Korea and yes it could be. However look at the current unemployment in China, Russia the U.S. and so on. The Middle East is ready to go.

    Yes things are more likely to go this time than at any other stage.

  28. #28
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Okla-culture shock-homa
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    2,907
    Quote Originally Posted by Maryh View Post
    I guess we'll just have to wait and see. Daughter is on the plane now heading over to be part of Key Resolve. I know she keeps track of things going on over there, has been there several times and from what I could tell on the phone today, she's not upset and definitely making her summer plans. I pray it is just bluster and posturing. Also son's friends in Seoul are not getting bent out of shape. They want him to come over and visit. These are just two different views being presented here.
    Exactly, Mary, it is just bluster and posturing. No worries, the NK's are an impotent tempest in half a teapot. A pitiful bunch, to be sure.

    I personally know a satellite engineer with Northrup Gruman who worked with the south koreans on putting up some satellites and they want everything for nothing. Yes, they were very giving to get what they wanted, then they were very demanding and exasperated everyone connected with the contract.

    Of course I will pray for the safety of your daughter. Heck, I'd go over there if I thought I could do any good, but that time is long gone.
    Every Time History Repeats Itself The Price Goes Up.

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Smallville
    Posts
    8,658
    Non-nuke EMP bombs only have a range of a few hundred meters. Why use one when you could do more damage cheaply with a regular explosive bomb?

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    430
    Quote Originally Posted by Maryh View Post
    I guess we'll just have to wait and see. Daughter is on the plane now heading over to be part of Key Resolve. I know she keeps track of things going on over there, has been there several times and from what I could tell on the phone today, she's not upset and definitely making her summer plans. I pray it is just bluster and posturing. Also son's friends in Seoul are not getting bent out of shape. They want him to come over and visit. These are just two different views being presented here.
    No matter what the solution, prayers for you and your family while your daughter is away. Prayers for her safety and a fast return. Please thank her for her service, it has not gone without notice. We are appriciative for her efforts, no matter what they may be.

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