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FOOD Oven Canning
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Thread: Oven Canning

  1. #1
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    Oven Canning

    I think I'm in love . . . with oven canning! Just pack the jars with anything that is dry, no liquid. Heat for one hour in a 200 degree oven. Put the lids on when you take the jars out of the oven and they seal by themselves.

    I canned saltine crackers, club crackers, graham crackers, powdered milk, cornmeal, and flour today. Cereal, baking powder, and baking soda next. Yeast powder can not be canned.

    The food doesn't get stale on the shelf and no freezer burn. You can store the jars anywhere, since there is no liquid that will freeze.
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    By perseverance the snail reached the ark. ~~ Charles H. Spurgeon

  2. #2
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    THAT'S cool!

  3. #3
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    now, isn't that an interesting idea!

    1Pe 4:7 But the end of all things is at hand: be ye therefore of sound mind, and be sober unto prayer

    Joh 3:16 For God so loved the world that He gave His only-begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life.
    Joh 3:17 For God did not send His Son into the world to condemn the world, but so that the world might be saved through Him.


  4. #4
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    Wow, I'd like to know more. Sounds great and solves lots of problems.

  5. #5
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    What's the expected life on the canned dry goods? Powdered milk for instance?

    1Pe 4:7 But the end of all things is at hand: be ye therefore of sound mind, and be sober unto prayer

    Joh 3:16 For God so loved the world that He gave His only-begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life.
    Joh 3:17 For God did not send His Son into the world to condemn the world, but so that the world might be saved through Him.


  6. #6
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    Samsmom, Great idea - How did you hear about this? Is there a reference guide or book available since I'm thinking about trying rice,beans, and pasta.
    "I can explain it to you, but I can't make you understand it"

  7. #7
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    Oh me too I want to do it !!
    "Don't forget to be kind to strangers. For some who have done this have entertained angels without realizing it."
    --Hebrews 13:2

    American by birth, Southerner by the Grace of God, and Saved by the Blood of Christ.

  8. #8
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    There was an article in the Jan/Feb 2012 issue of Countryside & Small Stock magazine. I can't pull up the article, copyright protected.

    There are several different methods. You can heat the oven to 200 degrees, turn the oven off, and put the open jars in for an hour. I left the oven on and everything was okay. Some places say to heat the oven to 275 degrees.

    The mylar bags and o2 absorbers are usually more popular because you can process a greater amount of food more quickly. We've done that also. But there's just the 2 of us now and it would take a long time for DH and I to consume a 5-gal bucket of anything. The quart jars are handy because the food can be used up quicker. I got so tired of stale crackers, we couldn't eat them fast enough and there was no way to store extra boxes.

    You can also can macaroni, spaghetti, pasta, dry beans, rice, anything dry.

    I'm not sure about the shelf life. But the nice thing is that if one jar does become unsealed or goes bad, you won't lose the whole batch like you would in a mylar bag in a 5-gal bucket.
    By perseverance the snail reached the ark. ~~ Charles H. Spurgeon

  9. #9
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    it's cheaper in the long run to use oxygen absorbers. The fuel to run the oven will cover the cost. If you do beans in the oven, they will not grow if you need to use them as seeds. The heat might deactivate some of the vitamins as well. Especially in the milk. I do this with quart jars and the small o2 absorbers as well as the buckets.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by CGTech View Post
    now, isn't that an interesting idea!
    What is Oven Canning?

    http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-oven-canning.htm

    Video's at bottom of page on this link
    Oven canning is a controversial method of food preservation that uses low oven heat to process and seal jars of fruits, vegetables, and sometimes grains. It is typically not recommended by food safety experts for several reasons, including temperature accuracy and increased likelihood of contamination or spoilage. The process often involves a lot of guesswork or past experience. Reading up on the various methods and processes, as well as understanding the leading risks and expert recommendations, is essential before beginning.
    “Dry” Oven Canning

    When people talk about oven canning they are most often referring to “dry canning,” in which cans of prepared food are set in a warmed oven and allowed to process for a set amount of time. This method is quite controversial in the food community and is often harshly criticized as being dangerous and unsafe.

    The theory behind dry canning is that cooks are able to kill any food-borne bacteria by slowly heating the food in glass jars. The oven is usually heated to around 200F (about 93C), and the jars placed on the oven’s racks and allowed to heat for 30 minutes to an hour. When the jars “pop” — that is, when their seals depress — they are believed to be closed off from contaminants, and they can theoretically be stored at room temperature for several years.
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    Food Safety Concerns with Dry Canning

    Contamination is the main fear when it comes to dry canning. In order for food to be shelf-stable, it must be heated to a hot enough temperature that any latent bacteria in the food is killed off. The premise behind dry canning is usually sound, as a 200F oven is generally hot enough to be considered sterile. Not all oven thermometers are accurate, however, and it can be tough for home cooks to know whether the external temperature is actually penetrating the jars.

    There is no way for cooks to test the internal jar temperature without removing the lids and compromising the food. Any bacteria that remains in sealed jars can grow into toxins over time, which can cause serious food poisoning once the contents is eventually consumed. Sometimes spoiled food looks discolored or has an unpleasant taste, but not always.
    Risk of Explosion

    A more immediate danger of oven canning is explosion. Canning jars are not designed to be exposed to prolonged dry heat and have been known to crack or even shatter during processing. At best, this creates a huge mess; at worst, it can lead to severe burns, cuts, and infections.
    Water-Based Oven Canning

    Some of the downsides of dry canning can be avoided by using water. According to this process, jars are placed in a pan of water inside the oven rather than simply standing alone on the racks. This method is very similar to water bath canning, and while still controversial, tends to have fewer safety concerns.

    The traditional so-called “water bath” canning method involves bringing a large pot of water on the stove to a boil, then submerging closed jars for a set amount of time. The boiling water creates both heat and pressure that sterilizes the food and forms a vacuum seal.

    Setting jars in a similar water bath in the oven can achieve similar results, and often uses less energy. The jars do not always need to be submerged, either, as the heat of the oven combined with the steam from the water can produce a powerful seal in a shorter amount of time. Still, the practice is widely criticized as being far less precise than the standard water bath method, and home canners are advised to carefully weigh the risks against the perceived convenience when choosing one method over another.
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  11. #11
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    This is NOT recommended on anything other than DRY foods. No veggies, meats, or anything that has moisture in them can be used.

    This method of canning is not taking the place of water bath canning.

    Again, only DRY foods are used.

    I put the open jars on a large cookie sheet in the oven. After an hour, I put the two-piece lids on the jars immediately after taking them out of the oven.
    By perseverance the snail reached the ark. ~~ Charles H. Spurgeon

  12. #12
    This is AWESOME...!!! Thank you so much for sharing...!!!

    Any idea of shelf life of the products canned?
    People willing to trade their freedom for temporary security deserve neither and will lose both. --Benjamin Franklin

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  13. #13
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    Yep, as long as you use it ONLY for foods which are shelf stable at room temperature for the short run (a few weeks or month) this can really extend their life. Essentially, it's just vacuum sealing, though- you can get the exact same effect by using canning jars and lids, and a good vacuum sealer with the canning jar attachment. The heat doesn't do anything (except provide the means for creating a vacuum in the jar after it cools).

    I've done this with nuts- pecans, walnuts and almonds- and they're still good after 5 years. I paid around $2.50 a pound for them- check those prices now!! It also has worked for wheat germ (up to 4 years), brown rice (probably the hardest thing I've found to keep from going rancid- I try to use it within 2 years, even oven canned or vacuum sealed), dry fruit...

    Shelf life will depend to a certain extent on storage conditions- stored in a hot attic, even without oxygen in the jar, they aren't going to stay good for long. Stored in a relatively cool and dark place, probably up to 10 years...

    Summerthyme

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by raftermancolo View Post
    This is AWESOME...!!! Thank you so much for sharing...!!!

    Any idea of shelf life of the products canned?

    No idea on the shelf life. They'll probably outlive me!
    By perseverance the snail reached the ark. ~~ Charles H. Spurgeon

  15. #15
    A vacuum sealer with a canning attachment does about the same. I will keep this in mind though.



  16. #16
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    Yep vacuum sealer will work just as well. Just as a FYI they do make smaller quart and pint size mylar bags as well. I put up long term stuff in serving size in those bags and then put them in my 5 gallon buckets. They take up around the same size space in the buckets as the big mylar bags but you don't have to open 5 gallons of whatever. You just open what you would use in a single use.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by LtPiper View Post
    Yep vacuum sealer will work just as well. Just as a FYI they do make smaller quart and pint size mylar bags as well. I put up long term stuff in serving size in those bags and then put them in my 5 gallon buckets. They take up around the same size space in the buckets as the big mylar bags but you don't have to open 5 gallons of whatever. You just open what you would use in a single use.

    We have a vacuum sealer, but it would take quite a while if you had a lot of jars to seal. I have arthritis in my fingers and it's really hard to open the 5-gal buckets. It's also difficult to get the food into the mylar bags. At least the glass jars stay still!
    By perseverance the snail reached the ark. ~~ Charles H. Spurgeon

  18. #18
    Good idea, but it might not be the best method for the powdered milk, since heat really does tend to reduce its shelf life and make it taste "old" sooner.

  19. #19
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    You can't vacuum pack with a sealer and a qt jar any powdered stuff like milk. The vacuum just sucks it up the tube. But great for other stuff like macaroni, beans, rice, etc. However, I use the vittle vaults that hold 50 pounds or more and have gama lids. I toss in some O2 absorbers. I bought 50# of macaroni for y2k. Am still using it. It might take a little longer to cook now, but not much. I have all my grains stored this way too. About 3 years ago I used up the last of my [B]1978[B] hard red wheat. I was a student of Howard Ruff and Gary North so I started prepping/farming in the early 70s.


    LIVE WITHIN YOUR HARVEST

  20. #20


    Bucket wrench--available at hardware, paint, farm and home improvement stores everywhere.
    "This place is fantastic! It's like "Gone With The Wind" on mescaline. They walk imaginary pets here...and they're all heavily armed and drunk..."
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  21. #21
    The bucket wrench works well for me ( I have RA and my hands hurt all the time).
    We also use the vacuum sealer on canning jars and mylar bags with a ziploc seal for some smaller items.
    Genny

  22. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by big kumara View Post


    Bucket wrench--available at hardware, paint, farm and home improvement stores everywhere.
    thats plastic itll brake. get the metal one. ask me how i know! lol

    mike

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Taz View Post
    You can't vacuum pack with a sealer and a qt jar any powdered stuff like milk. The vacuum just sucks it up the tube. But great for other stuff like macaroni, beans, rice, etc. However, I use the vittle vaults that hold 50 pounds or more and have gama lids. I toss in some O2 absorbers. I bought 50# of macaroni for y2k. Am still using it. It might take a little longer to cook now, but not much. I have all my grains stored this way too. About 3 years ago I used up the last of my [B]1978[B] hard red wheat. I was a student of Howard Ruff and Gary North so I started prepping/farming in the early 70s.
    You can if you use Mason jars, prepared lids, and the canning jar attachment.
    The thing about common sense is, it is not so common any more
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  24. #24
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    Some articles say not to oven can sugar. Anyone know why or have you oven canned sugar?

  25. #25
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    Why would you bother? Sugar keeps essentially forever, as long as it's dry (and fairly cool). I can see that it might start melting if you used much heat trying to oven can it...

    Summerthyme

  26. #26
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    I never heard of such a thing. Thank you so much. Now I need to get more jars!

  27. #27
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    There is no need to can sugar. Sugar's only real enemy is moisture. As it is highly hygronomic, you need to keep it dry, but that is really the only requirement for keeping sugar for decades.....
    The thing about common sense is, it is not so common any more
    Sic Semper Tyrannis

    It is difficult to stand idly by and watch the vacuum of ignorance being filled with lies. ~Raven

  28. #28
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    I think sugar can be better stored in buckets. Mice and humidity are the major factors.

    I would like to give an update on my oven canning results now a year later. I stored all the jars in a shed under a window. The dehydrated hash browns which were on top were burned by the sun. The saltine crackers a few rows down were stale and rancid. A jar of macaroni and a jar of flour had been opened by something. One lid had large teeth marks on it! I should have left the rings on the jars.

    The lesson I learned from this is that the jars should be kept in a dark cool place with the rings left on the lids. Even then, I don't know if that would keep the food from going stale. Oh well, it was an experiment after all. The chickens will eat good for awhile!

    I think the mylar and O2 packets in buckets are the best way to store food. But once you open the buckets, you need to use up the food fairly quickly or replace the O2. Correct? With just DH and myself, it would take a while to use up a whole of bucket of anything, so I was looking for a way to store things in smaller batches.
    By perseverance the snail reached the ark. ~~ Charles H. Spurgeon

  29. #29
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    DustyOpal- just remember, the only things you can "can" using this method are DRY things that normally store at room temperature without special packaging. Cereal, crackers, flour, rice, etc... (also dehydrated fruits and veggies store much longer if they are canned this way)

    Summerthyme

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Samsmom View Post
    I think sugar can be better stored in buckets. Mice and humidity are the major factors.

    I would like to give an update on my oven canning results now a year later. I stored all the jars in a shed under a window. The dehydrated hash browns which were on top were burned by the sun. The saltine crackers a few rows down were stale and rancid. A jar of macaroni and a jar of flour had been opened by something. One lid had large teeth marks on it! I should have left the rings on the jars.

    The lesson I learned from this is that the jars should be kept in a dark cool place with the rings left on the lids. Even then, I don't know if that would keep the food from going stale. Oh well, it was an experiment after all. The chickens will eat good for awhile!

    I think the mylar and O2 packets in buckets are the best way to store food. But once you open the buckets, you need to use up the food fairly quickly or replace the O2. Correct? With just DH and myself, it would take a while to use up a whole of bucket of anything, so I was looking for a way to store things in smaller batches.
    Even in mylar with O2 absorbers, storing in "less than climate controlled" conditions WILL shorten the storage life considerably.

    I have stored oyster crackers (saltine type) with oven canning for 18 months, and they were fresh and crisp- stored in the dark in our cool basement.

    As far as your problem with larger quantities- that's simple to solve. Just buy smaller mylar bags, and put several of them in a pail. I have buckets of "assorted" foodstuffs- several with 5, 1 gallon bags of different types of dried fruit, for example.

    Just remember, though, that O2 absorbers CAN pull down the bags hard enough to crush foods like noodles and crackers...

    Summerthyme

  31. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by fun e 1 View Post
    thats plastic itll brake. get the metal one. ask me how i know! lol

    mike
    not only are they more fragile than the metal long handled one, they simply don't work very well.
    Last edited by ericha; 10-26-2013 at 12:26 PM.

  32. #32
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    Thanks about the sugar.

  33. #33
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    We have Houdini mice-they can chew through plastic containers. Walmart in our area just began selling metal garbage cans for $20, but some guy went in and bought every one in the store so I have to wait.

    I wish they made square metal gargage cans that were stackable...

  34. #34
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    Put poison bars out between the pails... they'll eat them before they chew through plastic!

    The rodent problem is one reason I've stocked about 50# of rat bars... although currently we haven't had any problems with any in the house, and our current crop of barn cats are really hunting hard...

    Summerthyme

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