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FOOD Comment by grocery store cashier
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Results 81 to 92 of 92
  1. #81
    Quote Originally Posted by packyderms_wife View Post
    That's what not what they are saying for Iowa here locally. I hope your right though cause I'd really like to see the bug population reduced.

    K-
    I agree. Last winter was too warm for the usual "bug control". We had to have spraying done for the first time because of this--spiders and ants.

  2. #82
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Grand Canyon National Park
    Posts
    9,385
    Quote Originally Posted by packyderms_wife View Post
    Iowa grows a LOT of sweet corn and corn for canned corn, and to my knowledge none of it is irrigated because rain is, or at least used to be, a common occurance here. We also grow a lot of sugar beets here, in addition to a lot of seed corn.

    Apparently you haven't heard about the millions of acres of cropland in Cali that have been decommissioned, there's a thread on that topic somewhere here at TB. And soon you won't be enjoying those crops in Colorado, the greenies are putting a stop to irrigation and everywhere. If they can do it in Cali they can do it in Colorado.

    K-
    Funny...I spent the winter in Cali and crop land everywhere and in use. True about up around the Klamith, but that is only a small %. Glad you are so knowledgeable about water in Colorado....I'm sure all the farmers here are unaware about their water rights being in jeopardy.
    May God be with us in the coming days

  3. #83
    Quote Originally Posted by rafter View Post
    Funny...I spent the winter in Cali and crop land everywhere and in use. True about up around the Klamith, but that is only a small %. Glad you are so knowledgeable about water in Colorado....I'm sure all the farmers here are unaware about their water rights being in jeopardy.
    That was all I could find with a quick search, too, it's only 200,000 acres or so, as best I could tell.
    Water is certainly becoming the new oil, that's for sure.

  4. #84
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    21,899
    rafter- I think "millions" of acres is a vast overestimate, but they HAVE lost 10s of thousands of acres due to salinization of the soil from years and years of irrigation. Doesn't have much to do with the "greenies" however... just a fact of life when you irrigate constantly.

    I DO remember reading about orchards out there being lost due to loss of irrigation water, too- decades old trees dying because someone pulled the permits or whatever. It doesn't do to get too complacent about water ANYwhere, given what is going on behind the scenes. The environmentalists don't care about humans... if it's a fight between "Gaia" or some stupid small fish, insect or animal- the humans will lose every time.

    Summerthyme

  5. #85
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    West NC Mountains
    Posts
    7,751
    About 6 weeks ago our local Food Lion remodeled the store. The shelving is shorter and the aisles smaller. Then, the walls are all lined with refrigerator foods behind glass doors. Things like cheese, biscuits, milk, cold cuts that were out in open refrigerator shelves are now behind glass doors like freezer foods.

    Today I went to Bi-Lo's and they've done the same remodeling. The regular shelves are only 2-3 cans deep, They took out a whole produce side replacing it with 'bonus buy' shelves of their store brand goods. The produce that was 2 aisles is now one and more of the expensive items. Regular head lettuce was $1.59 ea!

    One lady and I were both looking at the cheese, she said, " this is kinda creepy, are they getting ready for rationing?' It took me a minute to register that she really said that! When I thought about it, it is kind of creepy.

    Meat on sale was so expensive, more than the regular price a month ago!

    Even people on food stamps are going to find it hard to feed their family. Once they realize they can't make it, trouble will start.

  6. #86
    Quote Originally Posted by MtnGal View Post
    About 6 weeks ago our local Food Lion remodeled the store. The shelving is shorter and the aisles smaller. Then, the walls are all lined with refrigerator foods behind glass doors. Things like cheese, biscuits, milk, cold cuts that were out in open refrigerator shelves are now behind glass doors like freezer foods.

    Today I went to Bi-Lo's and they've done the same remodeling. The regular shelves are only 2-3 cans deep, They took out a whole produce side replacing it with 'bonus buy' shelves of their store brand goods. The produce that was 2 aisles is now one and more of the expensive items. Regular head lettuce was $1.59 ea!

    One lady and I were both looking at the cheese, she said, " this is kinda creepy, are they getting ready for rationing?' It took me a minute to register that she really said that! When I thought about it, it is kind of creepy.

    Meat on sale was so expensive, more than the regular price a month ago!

    Even people on food stamps are going to find it hard to feed their family. Once they realize they can't make it, trouble will start.
    Our grocery store did this too. They also went to these little bins for produce that look sort of like a refrigerator bin and hold about as much.
    When they actually have a deal on produce now, I have to ask for more than they have out.

  7. #87
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    N. Minnesota
    Posts
    4,814
    Yesterday, on my way to work, found myself at Best Buy (Momma needed a new graphics card in her computer ) and at the local grocery chain store.

    At grocery store, they had boneless beef sirloin tip roast and steak on sale all week for $2.89 and pork roast and steak for $1.97/lb. so my cart was just hauling meat. The cashier noticed, said a lot of people were taking advantage of the prices. I told her I was filling the freezer while the prices were down. She "whispered" (really) that many folks were doing the same. Also, that many folks were hauling out canned vegetables, tomatoes and spaghetti sauce by the multiple caseloads. They tell her it's because they want to beat the price increases.

    Then I fly into Best Buy, grab my graphics card, and hit the checkout. In chatting with the cashier, mention that we were supposed to get rain, so I didn't have to water the garden that morning. She volunteered that she had just talked to her brother in Iowa the night before. He said the ground was cracking, everything was dead, and it was really bad. Prices for everything were going to go nuts, and people won't pay attention until it's too late to get ahead on things.

    Well, I was a bit rattled hearing this talk from random folk yesterday, pretty much unprompted. Appears that SOME are getting clued in to this thing.

    OK. Back to freezing beans and canning chicken...

  8. #88
    This came across my computer late yesterday

    G20 awaits September grain report before plans on food
    (Reuters) - Senior figures from G20 countries will discuss alarm bells raised by food price rises and how to combat volatility next week, but any decisions are unlikely before a mid-September report on grain supply, an official said on Thursday.

    The third price surge in four years after drought in the United states and poor crops from Russia and the Black Sea bread basket has stirred new fears about food supply and inflation.

    France, the United States and G20 president Mexico will hold a conference call on Monday to consider whether an emergency international meeting is required, aiming to avoid the food price spike that triggered unrest in poorer countries in 2008.

    Ahead of the call, South Korea's President Lee Myung-bak sent a letter to G20 members calling on them to step up joint action to stabilize international grain prices, his office said.

    But a French farm ministry official told Reuters the G20 will wait for the next release of a report by the Agricultural Market Information System (AMIS) in mid-September that should yield a clearer picture of grain supply.

    "This conference call is to take stock of the situation," the official said.

    "The AMIS report will not be available for another two weeks so we would rather take a decision at government level and in our role as coordinator of the G20 (farm) system between September 10 and September 15," he added.
    http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/...87M0Q820120823

  9. #89
    I have been wanting to lay in a lot more wheat do I can grind and bake bread.

    I recall in days gone buy getting mac n cheeze generic at save - a -lot grocerys for 10 for a dollar.

    Corn here, seems to be doing ok, but mostly just the sweet stuff. I have a few buckets of hard corn to grind into meal for corn bread, but I'd sure like to increase the amount.

    Gotta have the corn bread to go with pintos n spam.

  10. #90
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    8,545
    I could never eat the generic mac and cheese. Tried it once and have stuck with Kraft ever since.
    Earth is bootcamp for eternity.
    The Social Security number is a bigger threat to Liberty than Communism or Osama bin Laden.

  11. #91
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    just over the next hill
    Posts
    11,442
    "...the walls are all lined with refrigerator foods behind glass doors. Things like cheese, biscuits, milk, cold cuts that were out in open refrigerator shelves are now behind glass doors like freezer foods. "

    On the one hand, closed cases are genuinely more energy-efficient (cheaper to run).

    On the other hand, they may be easy to lock, depnding on what the door handles are like....
    "You're not living in the story the world tells you you're living in. The story is not about the Clash of Civilizations, the March of Progress, the American Dream, the Rise of Civilization or the Struggle of Race, Class, and Gender. It's about the triumph of Jesus Christ in rescuing us from this passing world and bringing us into eternal ecstasy and perfection."---Mark Shea

  12. #92
    Quote Originally Posted by FREEBIRD View Post
    "...the walls are all lined with refrigerator foods behind glass doors. Things like cheese, biscuits, milk, cold cuts that were out in open refrigerator shelves are now behind glass doors like freezer foods. "

    On the one hand, closed cases are genuinely more energy-efficient (cheaper to run).

    On the other hand, they may be easy to lock, depnding on what the door handles are like....
    Huh. Hadn't thought of that. A chain through the handles would work just fine on the ones I've seen.

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