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HEALTH Gallbladder Removal: How it can be avoided?
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  1. #1
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    Gallbladder Removal: How it can be avoided?

    FYI.


    http://thehealthcoach1.com/?p=1095

    Gallbladder Removal: How it can be avoided?
    Posted on April 10, 2012 by 1healthcoach

    The real question is why so many pre, peri, and post menopausal women elect to have their gallbladders removed without proper justification?

    This often unnecessary surgery has been all the rage for many years now. Let’s take a peek behind this curtain to see what dynamic has evolved which compels people to give up an organ which serves a very important purpose.

    First, do you have any idea how many cholecystectomies are performed each year? More than 750,000 according to The Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract. That’s a LOT of removed gallbladders. At that rate 7.5 million will be extracted over a ten year period.

    “Cholecystectomy ( /ˌkɒləsɪsˈtɛktəmi/; plural: cholecystectomies) is the surgical removal of the gallbladder. It is the most common method for treating symptomatic gallstones. Surgical options include the standard procedure, called laparoscopic cholecystectomy, and an older more invasive procedure, called open cholecystectomy.” (Per Wikipedia – Cholecystectomy)

    The most significant factoid above is that gallbladder removal “is the most common method for treating symptomatic gallstones.” Can you believe that? The average American liver has between 500 and 4000 gallstones and an entire organ is extracted because one or two might be clogging up the gallbladder.

    Granted there are cases where a gallbladder may go beyond a point of no return because of a longstanding infection along with other major complications, which make it medically necessary to remove it. However, that situation is by far the exception, not the norm.

    Please be aware that the liver alone can produce hundreds of gallstones (even thousands of gall-pebbles) over the course of a lifetime, which the body naturally sloughs off over time. A diet full of certain foods like beets will ensure that these gallstones, gall-pebbles, gall-sand, and gall-chaff are regularly ushered out of the liver/gallbladder area and into the intestinal tract where they will be marshaled out of the body.

    Therefore, because one little, or big, gallstone sits in the gallbladder is hardly a reason for taking out the organ. And, yes, there are safe and efficacious protocols and procedures for dealing with the bigger ones should they present a problem. For instance, the gallbladder flush might be a very good place to start. Here’s a protocol which we have performed regularly over the past 20+ years.

    Hulda Clark Gallbladder Flush & Liver Cleanse

    By performing regular gallbladder flushes and other types of liver cleanses these two organs are kept purged of unwanted gallstones, thereby greatly lowering the likelihood of ever requiring any type of surgery. Whereas this particular protocol produces a quick removal of many stones, there are many other more gentle approaches which gradually soften and remove the gallstones over days. These require more discipline, but may be easier for those who are prone to discomfort or nausea when conducting a more intense gallblabber flush. Here’s an example of one that we like quite a bit.

    Gall Bladder and Liver Flush from the Queens’s Health Center II

    The question remains: Why is it that so many pre, peri, and post menopausal women elect to have their gallbladders removed without proper justification?

    We’ll take up this serious medical ‘epidemic’ in our next installment of:
    Gallbladder Removal: How it can be avoided? Part II

    May you enjoy great health!
    The Health Coach

    Required Reading:
    Are Gallbladder Attacks Misdiagnosed As Heart Attacks?

    Health Disclaimer:
    All content found at The Health Coach is for information purposes only. Therefore, the information on this website is not a substitute for professional medical care and should not be construed as either medical diagnosis or treatment. All information contained herein ought to be considered within the context of an individual’s overall health status and prescribed treatment plan.
    Since The Health Coach does not diagnose, treat, mitigate, cure, or heal any type of disease or medical condition, the information contained at this website is not intended to provide specific physical, mental, emotional or psychological health advice.
    It is entirely the reader’s decision to act or not act on any information at The Health Coach. Therefore, we fully invoke the HOLD HARMLESS clause for those who are responsible for putting any of this information into practical use and application.

    ©2012 The Health Coach1®. All rights reserved

    Permission is granted to post this health blog as long as it is linked back to the following url: http://thehealthcoach1.com/?p=1095

  2. #2
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    In my case it was because-
    Because the doctors can't diagnose appendicitis?
    You CANNOT "SIT IN JUDGMENT" UPON GOD, His works,, His plan, and His word, and still, FROM THAT VANTAGE POINT see the truth, or understand anything!!
    - Ex-"unbeliever"

  3. #3
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    When my gallbladder problems were unbearable, instead of doing what Mom did, have it removed, I started Dr. Mercola's gall bladder diet and watched this video TWICE -- a few weeks apart. Having a background in chemistry enough so as to understand the full information helped, but most of it is for laymen, except for a few minutes when the prof. says to chill cause he's going to get really technical for a few....If you don't have video access, it's worth your time to go to the library and listen to it. It's funny cause I wasn't using sugar when I watched this but did drink alcohol, wine. LOL You'll get the joke after you watch the video.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBnniua6-oM

    The gallbladder is only as healthy as your liver. There is much you can read online about gallbladder health.


    http://articles.mercola.com/sites/ar...l-bladder.aspx

    This is a little addition to the general Mercola eating plan for folks with gallbladder problems. Like most patients on the anti-inflammatory diet I lost 15 pounds the first month without trying, and kept them off and am losing more, albeit more slowly now. Never allowed myself to be hungry, and ate as much as I wanted whenever I wanted. He recommends repeating it a couple times a year, in 6 week stints. Will start another 6 weeks as soon as the asparagus comes up. That's my clue it's spring.

    GOod luck. You won't miss the pain.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBnniua6-oM
    “You are well aware that it is not numbers or strength that bring the victories in war. No, it is when one side goes against the enemy with the gods' gift of a stronger morale that their adversaries, as a rule, cannot withstand them.
    Xenophon: The Persian Expedition.

  4. #4
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    Ain't funny, I remember when you wrote about that surgery. How annoying. Hope you are all better now.
    “You are well aware that it is not numbers or strength that bring the victories in war. No, it is when one side goes against the enemy with the gods' gift of a stronger morale that their adversaries, as a rule, cannot withstand them.
    Xenophon: The Persian Expedition.

  5. #5
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    more
    http://articles.mercola.com/sites/ar...llbladder.aspx
    By Dr. Joseph Mercola
    with Rachael Droege

    The New York Times regional newspaper interviewed me about gallbladders and I thought it would be useful to review this common problem. I have seen many hundreds of patients who have had their gallbladders removed and I don't recall anyone ever telling me that their surgeon advised them to do something to compensate for removing this important organ.

    Just about every one of them was told they didn't need their gallbladder and that it was perfectly fine to have it removed. This is reprehensible ignorance as it condemns the patient to a lifelong deficiency of essential fatty acids.

    Why? Because after your liver produces bile, which emulsifies fats for improved fat digestion, half of it goes to the small intestine, and the other half is stored in the gallbladder until it’s needed.

    About 500,000 gallbladders are removed each year in the United States, typically due to gallstones, which affect about 15 percent of Americans. Gallstones form when bile is in the gallbladder too long and it collects and settles. Although most gallstones dissolve naturally and produce no symptoms, if one ignores warning symptoms and does not address the reasons why their gallbladder is not functioning properly, then the disease can progress to the point where the pancreas is inflamed or the gallbladder is seriously infected and may have to be removed to save a person’s life.

    Signs of Gallbladder Disease

    If you have any of the following symptoms then your gallbladder may not be functioning properly:


    Pain when pressing on the gallbladder, which is directly under the last rib on the right on the same plane as one’s nipple. This is usually due to gallbladder "sludge" (thick bile).


    Stone on a gallbladder ultrasound.


    Greasy stools that are loose and tend to float to the top of the toilet bowl. This indicates improper fat absorption.

    Treatment Methods


    As I said in my interview, regular exercise is one of the best things you can do to address gallbladder dysfunction. This is a great proactive prevention step but most people don't worry about their gallbladder until they have a problem. Unfortunately, by that time exercise alone is not going to cut it.


    At that time a gallbladder flush may provide some relief and once the symptoms abate an aggressive cardiovascular exercise program can serve to permanently improve the gallbladder.


    It is also imperative that you clean up your diet. One has to stop eating sugars, reduce or eliminate the grains and eliminate all fluids but water. You can consult my nutrition plan to make sure you’re eating enough healthy foods.

    Further, the gallbladder is frequently infected when it is diseased so large amounts of high-quality probiotics will also be helpful in correcting the problem.

    links to other articles at the site
    “You are well aware that it is not numbers or strength that bring the victories in war. No, it is when one side goes against the enemy with the gods' gift of a stronger morale that their adversaries, as a rule, cannot withstand them.
    Xenophon: The Persian Expedition.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by almost ready View Post
    Ain't funny, I remember when you wrote about that surgery. How annoying. Hope you are all better now.
    Getting there. The appendix removal not only cured right side chronic pain, it INSTANTLY CURED 3 YEAR bout of incapacitating diarrhea, TOTALLY. That more than anything gave me my life back.
    You CANNOT "SIT IN JUDGMENT" UPON GOD, His works,, His plan, and His word, and still, FROM THAT VANTAGE POINT see the truth, or understand anything!!
    - Ex-"unbeliever"

  7. #7
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    Avoid it? Good riddance. Never had a problem once the pesky thing was taken out. It was chock full of stones.
    No good deed ever goes unpunished.

  8. #8
    If the stones are small enough to be softened and expelled, it might be better to go that route.

    But when you have a very large stone, in my experience, it is better to have the operation.

    I was on the diet for a year.

    The first attack I had I thought "whatever it was" would kill me. The next day I researched to self diagnose my condition and then I began the diet. I passed a stone 3 weeks later.

    During a year I suffered at least a dozen attacks, 5 of which came during the last 3 months.
    None of which passed any more stones.

    I began to seek medical care after we got health insurance.

    I went to my family Dr. who referred me to a surgeon. I went to 2 different surgeons, because the first was at a teaching hospital and I didn't want to be a guinea pig so I requested a referal from my physician to see another surgeon. During the intitial consultation with the teaching surgeon, I asked for the stone to be removed and not the gall bladder. He said that most all patients have stones return because there's a bacteria that has colonized in the gall bladder which caused the stones to stick together and form. He left me under the impression that it would be a useless attempt to remove the stones and leave the gall bladder intact. My family physician listened to my concerns about surgery and informed me there really was no valid reason to keep the gall bladder. The second surgeon agreed he couldn't remove the stones and leave the gall bladder in place.

    It was all or nothing.

    After feeling I'd been dealt an ultimatum to either have surgery or receive no medical help to remove the stones, I did more research on what complications the stones may cause so I could know what I was dealing with if it tried to pass through on it's own. I felt it was too risky and could easily become a life threatening condition, along with wanting to end the pain, and so I decided surgery was the best option for me.

    It's been 13 weeks since my surgery and the only regret I have is that I didn't do it much sooner!

    And I can eat anything I want now too!

  9. #9
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    Hmm. I had mine out twenty-six years ago when open surgery was the only available option. I've had a passel of kids and thought I was pretty good with pain, but... I couldn't handle the repeated gallbladder attacks. For extra fun, I gained ninety-seven pounds in just a few months, and I wasn't overeating; I was too sick to eat much of anything. (I lost every bit of that weight and then some after the surgery - in only five months.)

    Thing is, the doctor put a titanium clip in my body, instead of suturing it, and my digestion and plumbing hasn't been the same since. I'd love to have the clip removed, but I'm not going through that again.

    Most people don't develop diseased gallbladders on the sunny side of fifty, and I was only twenty-eight when my problems began, and thirty when I had the surgery. My doctor said that my atypical dis-ease was due to having four babies in a five-year span, and I don't doubt it. I didn't stop having babies, but now, at age fifty-six, my womb has prolapsed and is falling out. I do exercises to postpone the inevitable but..., well, what can y'do? It's intriguing watching my body fall apart when mentally, emotionally, and spiritually, I feel that I'm just hitting my stride.
    Last edited by Beth; 04-16-2012 at 06:49 AM. Reason: word repetition
    [CENTER][B][SIZE=2][COLOR=blue]NOTHING WE DO MEANS ANYTHING IF IT IS NOT MOTIVATED BY LOVE, AND NOTHING WE LOVE IS SERVED IF IT DOES NOT MOTIVATE US TO DO.[/COLOR][/SIZE][/B][/CENTER]

  10. #10
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    Take all the chances you want with your gall bladder, but if that sucker ruptures, you are in deep doo-doo, almost literally. At the best, you will be walking around with tubes coming out of you in odd places.

    Less then the best, in bed with tubes running in and out.
    "The misfortune of many is the consolation of fools" Ancient proverb

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Troke View Post
    Take all the chances you want with your gall bladder, but if that sucker ruptures, you are in deep doo-doo, almost literally. At the best, you will be walking around with tubes coming out of you in odd places.

    Less then the best, in bed with tubes running in and out.
    Sure are! My Mom almost died like that. Had to have emergency gall surgery.

  12. Quote Originally Posted by TBonz View Post
    Avoid it? Good riddance. Never had a problem once the pesky thing was taken out. It was chock full of stones.
    +1

    I was so glad to be rid of my painful gallbladder. I had one, very large stone.

  13. #13
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    Hi All
    Just a bit more data on why diet can affect gallbladders.
    http://paleodietnews.com/2524/the-pa...ladder-issues/
    Cheers
    Ed

  14. #14
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    I had 3 children in 5 years and my gallbladder issues began when the baby was 2. My doctor said the same thing as yours did - I had several babies in quick succession and that did in the gallbladder.

    Quote Originally Posted by Beth View Post
    My doctor said that my atypical dis-ease was due to having four babies in a five-year span, and I don't doubt it.
    No good deed ever goes unpunished.

  15. #15
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    I had four babies in 6 years. Had my gallbladder out in February. Small gallstones can lead to pancreatitis and death, no thank you. The operation wasn't horrible.

    RD
    You broke into the wrong rec room.

  16. #16
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    My wife has had attacks for 2 years now...first they were several months apart but this past week she had 2 real bad ones. 3 days ago the pain lasted over 12 hours.

    The first time we went to Doc he said it was probably an ulcer or acid reflux so gave meds for that. That didnt work.

    I diagnosed my wife and went back and told the Doc its most likely gallstones...he said yeah, why didnt I think of that. (WTH!!)

    She had ultrasound done today and sure enough, stones.

    So now its either remove the gallbladder or find an alternative. From the sounds of it we will most likely be removing it.

    For those who had it removed, could you eat dairy and other fatty foods after, at least sometimes? Pizza, ice cream, fried foods, etc? Just curious of how strict of a diet she needs to have afterwards.

    That same cholesterol has to be going somewhere.

  17. #17
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    I noticed no change. But then, it could be that my gallbladder had quit functioning a long time earlier so removing it had no effect. I can eat anything.
    "The misfortune of many is the consolation of fools" Ancient proverb

  18. Quote Originally Posted by bassaholic View Post
    For those who had it removed, could you eat dairy and other fatty foods after, at least sometimes? Pizza, ice cream, fried foods, etc? Just curious of how strict of a diet she needs to have afterwards.

    That same cholesterol has to be going somewhere.
    I had to eat carefully for only a couple of months after the surgery - now I have no restrictions on my diet.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by TBonz View Post
    Avoid it? Good riddance. Never had a problem once the pesky thing was taken out. It was chock full of stones.
    Same here. No regrets, and recovery time was minimal. There are two scars, about half-inch each, barely noticeable. Two days after my after surgery, I had to drive someone to the Emergency Room for a broken arm.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by bassaholic View Post
    Just curious of how strict of a diet she needs to have afterwards.
    Just like always, I eat whatever I want. No restrictions.

  21. #21
    I ended up with bypass surgery from what started as a gallbladder attack.

    One Sunday afternoon I had severe pain at the tip of my breastbone and my nurse daughter, who just happened to be visiting, ended up calling 911. After a trip to the hospital and several tests including CAT scan, they kept me overnight. The next day they did a stress test, which I would have sworn I passed like always, and major problems were found.

    So they did the “up the leg thing” found a major blockage and the next day I ended up in surgery.

    The Gallbladder that caused the original problem???

    Four months after heart surgery I had another major Gallbladder attack (stuck stone) and they ended up taking it out because it was majorly full of stones. The surgeon even took pictures and that thing was packed with stones, to bad I'm not an oyster I’d been rich.

    But I sure am glad that it acted up when it did and they found the other problem. Also glad it's gone.

  22. #22
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    OK, so who has had their gall bladder removed and can still eat Popeye's Fried Chicken? LOL

    On a more serious note, 75% of the women I work with have had gall bladder surgery, almost 50% in the last 6 months, the rest within 1 year. I don't know what's going on, but most of their docs are blaming it on our poor (very hard) water quality.

    Kajun
    Stupid outta hurt immediately!

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buckster View Post
    FYI.


    http://thehealthcoach1.com/?p=1095

    Gallbladder Removal: How it can be avoided?
    Posted on April 10, 2012 by 1healthcoach

    The real question is why so many pre, peri, and post menopausal women elect to have their gallbladders removed without proper justification?

    This often unnecessary surgery has been all the rage for many years now. Let’s take a peek behind this curtain to see what dynamic has evolved which compels people to give up an organ which serves a very important purpose.

    First, do you have any idea how many cholecystectomies are performed each year? More than 750,000 according to The Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract. That’s a LOT of removed gallbladders. At that rate 7.5 million will be extracted over a ten year period.

    “Cholecystectomy ( /ˌkɒləsɪsˈtɛktəmi/; plural: cholecystectomies) is the surgical removal of the gallbladder. It is the most common method for treating symptomatic gallstones. Surgical options include the standard procedure, called laparoscopic cholecystectomy, and an older more invasive procedure, called open cholecystectomy.” (Per Wikipedia – Cholecystectomy)

    The most significant factoid above is that gallbladder removal “is the most common method for treating symptomatic gallstones.” Can you believe that? The average American liver has between 500 and 4000 gallstones and an entire organ is extracted because one or two might be clogging up the gallbladder.

    Granted there are cases where a gallbladder may go beyond a point of no return because of a longstanding infection along with other major complications, which make it medically necessary to remove it. However, that situation is by far the exception, not the norm.

    Please be aware that the liver alone can produce hundreds of gallstones (even thousands of gall-pebbles) over the course of a lifetime, which the body naturally sloughs off over time. A diet full of certain foods like beets will ensure that these gallstones, gall-pebbles, gall-sand, and gall-chaff are regularly ushered out of the liver/gallbladder area and into the intestinal tract where they will be marshaled out of the body.

    Therefore, because one little, or big, gallstone sits in the gallbladder is hardly a reason for taking out the organ. And, yes, there are safe and efficacious protocols and procedures for dealing with the bigger ones should they present a problem. For instance, the gallbladder flush might be a very good place to start. Here’s a protocol which we have performed regularly over the past 20+ years.

    Hulda Clark Gallbladder Flush & Liver Cleanse

    By performing regular gallbladder flushes and other types of liver cleanses these two organs are kept purged of unwanted gallstones, thereby greatly lowering the likelihood of ever requiring any type of surgery. Whereas this particular protocol produces a quick removal of many stones, there are many other more gentle approaches which gradually soften and remove the gallstones over days. These require more discipline, but may be easier for those who are prone to discomfort or nausea when conducting a more intense gallblabber flush. Here’s an example of one that we like quite a bit.

    Gall Bladder and Liver Flush from the Queens’s Health Center II

    The question remains: Why is it that so many pre, peri, and post menopausal women elect to have their gallbladders removed without proper justification?

    We’ll take up this serious medical ‘epidemic’ in our next installment of:
    Gallbladder Removal: How it can be avoided? Part II

    May you enjoy great health!
    The Health Coach

    Required Reading:
    Are Gallbladder Attacks Misdiagnosed As Heart Attacks?

    Health Disclaimer:
    All content found at The Health Coach is for information purposes only. Therefore, the information on this website is not a substitute for professional medical care and should not be construed as either medical diagnosis or treatment. All information contained herein ought to be considered within the context of an individual’s overall health status and prescribed treatment plan.
    Since The Health Coach does not diagnose, treat, mitigate, cure, or heal any type of disease or medical condition, the information contained at this website is not intended to provide specific physical, mental, emotional or psychological health advice.
    It is entirely the reader’s decision to act or not act on any information at The Health Coach. Therefore, we fully invoke the HOLD HARMLESS clause for those who are responsible for putting any of this information into practical use and application.

    ©2012 The Health Coach1®. All rights reserved

    Permission is granted to post this health blog as long as it is linked back to the following url: http://thehealthcoach1.com/?p=1095
    Excellent response!

    I've had several patients come to me with gallbladder problems, some within days of scheduled surgery, and I'm happy to report that all aforementioned patients still have their gallbladders, and a better idea of how to treat their bodies!
    [CENTER][B][SIZE=2][COLOR=blue]NOTHING WE DO MEANS ANYTHING IF IT IS NOT MOTIVATED BY LOVE, AND NOTHING WE LOVE IS SERVED IF IT DOES NOT MOTIVATE US TO DO.[/COLOR][/SIZE][/B][/CENTER]

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by bassaholic View Post
    My wife has had attacks for 2 years now...first they were several months apart but this past week she had 2 real bad ones. 3 days ago the pain lasted over 12 hours.

    For those who had it removed, could you eat dairy and other fatty foods after, at least sometimes? Pizza, ice cream, fried foods, etc? Just curious of how strict of a diet she needs to have afterwards.
    It's common for the attacks to come closer together like that as the gall bladder disease progresses.

    After surgery, I slowly added back food that I used to eat as I felt my body could handle it, and everything has went well.

    I've had pizza every day for the past 3 days with no problems at all. I can pretty much eat anything I want with no problems, although I do get mild diarhhea once or twice a week now since the surgery. Sometimes very greasy food will exasperate the condition.

    But I am so glad I had surgery and will never again have to deal with any more gall bladder attacks. When I still had my gall bladder, every day I was living in so much fear, so afraid to eat hardly anything for fear it would send me into an attack. Those attacks were so painful and hard to endure.

    Sometimes since the surgery, I still get mild pain in the gall bladder area, but it's very minimal and very easy to live with. I figure it's scar tissue inside me, or it might still have a little healing left. But it's nothing in comparison to an attack. I am just so glad I had the surgery!

    Good luck to your wife and I hope she can find healing and relief very soon!!!

  25. #25
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    Gallbladder issues "re-visited"

    Buckster:

    Hit the "search box" on TB2K! This issue has been discussed
    many times. Via Amazon.com ; search The Miracle Liver and
    Gall Bladder Cleanse ( short version) by Adrian Moritz.

    All the best to you, yours and your friends.

    Ranger
    Last edited by Ranger; 06-08-2012 at 01:06 AM.

  26. #26
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    There have been tests done by individuals, including on Curezone, that show that the stones that come out after doing a flush are in fact formed from what you are putting in (the flush ingredients). The use of red dye in a few different tests done online are proof.

    I believe it to be quackery.

    Some people "feel better" afterwards but that can easily be attributed to the placebo effect.

    JMO...

    From Curezone in regards to Hulda Clarks flush...

    "Hulda Clark and many of her followers believe that all stones expelled during the Liver Flush procedure have existed in that size and shape inside biliary tree, inside liver or inside gallbladder.
    Experiments have shown that majority of the so called "stones" expelled during the Liver Flush procedure are nothing more then bile precipitated into hard "stones". But it happened during the night, inside intestines, so that is why some of those "stones" are as large as a golf ball.

    But, some people indeed do get real gallstones out. Gallstones can not be expelled from gallbladder! Fact or Fiction?"

  27. #27
    Over the years I've assisted several people to take the cleanse, and twelve years ago I went on the Gall Bladder cleanse myself.
    First, a person should drink LOTS of apple juice or cider for about a week. The malic acid softens the stones, and the olive oil and lemon juice, on the seventh evening, causes the gallbladder to contract, and expell its contents, much like the peristalisis of the colon.

    About a year ago I felt some pain in the gallbladder area. I took a few tablespoons of olive oil and it stopped hurting. This was a warning, so I started drinking organic apple cider daily, and eating lots of root vegetables; beets and especially turnips. No more pain.
    BTW, these root vegetables will also soften and prevent kidney stones.

    The real gallstones are dullish green peas with a substance inside that looks like butter.
    Yes, there is usually lots of liver bile that's expelled too.

    I'm sure this is all argueable, but this is my experience shared.

    LeV
    LeV

  28. #28
    PS.
    There are lots of warnings about the gallbladder cleanse,... It's taking your health into your own hands; bypassing the seniority of trained professionals.

    I think most people should do what their doctor advises.


    LeV
    LeV

  29. Quote Originally Posted by TXKajun View Post
    OK, so who has had their gall bladder removed and can still eat Popeye's Fried Chicken? LOL

    On a more serious note, 75% of the women I work with have had gall bladder surgery, almost 50% in the last 6 months, the rest within 1 year. I don't know what's going on, but most of their docs are blaming it on our poor (very hard) water quality.

    Kajun
    Raises hand --- Laugh. I can eat anything I want and I am so glad I got rid of that painful gall bladder.

    Interesting about the hard water .... the water is very hard where I live too.

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    1,096
    I had two gall bladder attacks: The first and the last! Never in my 55 years (four years ago) had I felt such pain. It was badly infected. I had to spend a day in the hospital with IV antibiotics to cool it down and had surgery the second day. While I was in the emergency room I would have welcomed someone with a rusty pocket knife to cut it out!

    After the surgery I spent a couple of days in the hospital, a couple of weeks at home and all was and is well. The only effect was a change in my bowl movements. When I have to go I have to go!! Otherwise everything is normal. I can eat anything I want with no problems.

    I have known of a few folks that had to make minor dietary changes but nothing of great consequence.

    I had a ruptured appendix three years later and it was FAR worse than the gall bladder surgery.
    "Political Correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical minority, and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end."

    Protesting is like scratching a chalk board. It annoys but produces nothing of substance.

  31. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Posts
    41,203
    I had my done laproscopically. I was home by 2:00 the same day. The nurse said that the most difficult part would be the ride home. She was correct, except it was not much shucks either. She also regaled me with horror stories of two local dudes that delayed surgery, had it rupture, they spent hours on the table, days in the hospital and then a long time with tubes running out of them in various and sundry places.

    Not good.
    "The misfortune of many is the consolation of fools" Ancient proverb

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    11,399
    Here is more than you ever wanted to know about gall bladders

    Check the link. You can even subscribe to the Gallbladder Newsletter

    http://www.gallbladderattack.com/gal...rsurgery.shtml

    SHOULD I HAVE MY GALLBLADDER REMOVED?
    WHAT ARE THE SIDE EFFECTS OF GALLBLADDER SURGERY?

    Over 1/2 million people in America have their gallbladders removed every year. This is called cholecystectomy. Is it necessary? Will your digestion be perfect afterwards? That's what everybody's hoping for, to be pain free, gas free, bloat-free and to be able to eat whatever they like. You have a 60% chance of that happening. Out of every 10 cholecystectomies, 4 people will still have symtpoms.

    So read the research and find out what your chances are of that happening before you give your body parts up. And scroll over to the right of this page to read what my readers are saying about their experiences. And if you've had a good experience and are symptom-free 2 and 3 years after surgery, please write and tell us about it. We want to hear from you too.

    DID YOU KNOW that the Gallbladder Starter Kit can still be helpful after gallbladder removal?

    The most frequently asked question I receive on this website is this: "I have had my gallbladder removed. Why do I still have pain?"

    If you think of your problem as a biliary (bile) problem as opposed to a "gallbladder" problem you are more on the right track to understanding how to take care of it. Removing the gallbladder does not always address the problem in the body that is causing these symptoms. In order to break down and digest fats, your body must produce bile, which is done in the liver. Your gallbladder is merely a sac for holding some of the bile that the liver produces. Whether or not you have had your gallbladder removed, your liver is still producing bile in order to digest fats. Without the gallbladder, however, the bile is not as readily secreted in the body, and the liver can become overwhelmed when faced with large amounts of any fats, especially saturated fats and hydrogenated fats. And for some people even small amounts of fats can cause discomfort.

    One of the side effects of gallbladder removal can be the dumping of bile which is now not as easily regulated and can send someone running to the bathroom immediately after eating. A more common side effect is a decrease in the secretion of bile. If the bile produced by the liver becomes thick and sluggish, painful symptoms and bile stones can occur. Bile stones can form in the liver as well as the gallbladder. One woman had her gallbladder removed only to end up back in surgery again two or three days later where they found stones in the bile ducts of the liver causing her alot of pain.

    However, removing the gallbladder may be an absolute medical necessity. But, unless it is diseased, ruptured or otherwise sick, know that just having cholelithiasis or gallbladder stones does not mean you have to take it out. If you have gallbladder attacks, pain or discomfort or digestive problems but not a diseased gallbladder, this does not mean you necessarily have to have gallbladder surgery. Get a second opinion. You do have an option of cleaning up your diet, doing some work on your gallbladder and liver and keeping the body part that God gave you. If you happen to think that nature made a mistake and that you don't need it anyway, you probably wouldn't be reading this page in the first place.

    What's the worst thing that can happen? You try to fix the root of the problem which is based on cleaning up your diet and eating real food and real fats and not the "pretend food" that can sit on a shelf for 6 months to 2 years. What kind of a food takes two years to go bad? Nothing that will give health to your body, that's for sure. And if the gallbladder still needs to come out later, you've only gained by eating better anyway.

    The gallbladder does facilitate and regulate the flow of bile in your body. When that facilitator is taken away it is quite possible that the flow will be not as efficient, ie. too much at one time, or more commonly, not enough.

    Whether you opt for gallbladder surgery or not, consider taking products and changing your diet as well as doing a series of gallbladder and liver flushes (it does both at the same time) to take care of the root of your gallbladder problem.

    The most common problems, apart from actual pain are impaired digestion: bloating, gas, heartburn, constipation or diarrhea. You are/were already having trouble digesting fats. So why would removing the organ that regulates the metabolizer of fats improve your digestion? It may help with the pain, but know that 34% of people who have their gallbladder removed still experience some abdominal pain. (4)

    The easiest way to avoid this is to take an external supplement of bile salts to help your body with the digestion of fats. And do a series of mini gallbladder flushes. Supplemental bile salts, (unless you are experriencing bile dumping) available separately or in the After Gallbladder Removal Kit, should be taken frequently along with the digestive stimulant (also in the kit) to help stimulate your own digestive juices. Alternating the dosage of bile salts will help to mimic the body's way of secreting bile. For example, take one with breakfast, two at lunch, three at dinner, two with breakfast the next day, and so on in rotation.

    If you have the less common, but not unusual side effect after gallbladder removal of needing to run to the bathroom immediately after eating, you are probably getting too much bile instead of too little. This, unfortunately is much harder to control. Try the Dumping Syndrome Kit. Read more about postcholecystectomy diarrhea towards the bottom of this page.

    IS GALLBLADDER SURGERY EFFECTIVE

    What is meant by effective? Will you never have another gallbladder attack? I mean, how could you if you have no gallbladder, right? Will you never suffer from indigestion again? Will your gas and bloating disappear? Will the constipation go away? Will diarrhea resolve?

    The answer to all of the above is "sometimes". Let's look at gallbladder attacks. Gallstones can also be found in the liver and the bile ducts leading to the gallbladder. The attack is often (but not always) caused by a stone blocking a duct. And yes, this can still happen. As seen by research above, stones are formed partly due to what we eat. If we take the gallbladder out and continue to eat the same lithogenic forming diet that we did before, why should stones not form? They will. You may never know it. You may be asymptomatic for the rest of your life. Or, you may get a stone stuck in a bile duct. This is one of the reasons for the most frequently asked question on this site: "I had my gallbladder removed months (or years) ago. Why do I still have pain?" (See testimonials to the right for examples.) Removing the gallbladder does not always address the problem in the body that is causing these or other symptoms listed above. It has probably taken years for your body to form these stones. Your fat digestion has been impaired for a long time. In order to break down and digest fats, your body must produce bile, which is done in the liver. To address the root of the problem you must look to the liver and to your whole digestive system as a whole. These issues will be addressed in length in my future book. In there you will learn more than you ever wanted to know about your gallbladder.

    Another thing to keep in mind is that you could have another gallbladder disease that has not yet been diagnosed. For example, if an ultrasound is done and gallstones found, a cholecystectomy or gallbladder removal will be recommended without doing any further exploration. This is because the most obvious and easily diagnosed cause of gallbladder attacks is gallstones or cholelithiasis. And ultrasound is quick and non-invasive. However, if your gallbladder ejecting bile below 33%-40% which is considered normal range, you would be diagnosed with a low-functioning gallbladder or biliary dyskinesia. This can only be determined with a HIDA scan which is an invasive procedure using radioactive dye. Symptoms of biliary dyskinesia are not always resolved with cholecystectomy either for various known and unknown reasons. One reason is that the problem could be with the Sphincter of Oddi rather than the gallbladder itself.

    DIET AFTER GALLBLADDER REMOVAL

    If you understand the underlying root of your gallbladder disease usually being one of cholestasis or some imbalance in the bile composition itself, you will realize that most people are not out of the woods after surgery and able to eat anything they like. Treat your lack of a gallbladder as you would any gallbladder disease and eat the same way. There is a whole page on gallbladder diet with foods that are good for the gallbladder (think "bile") and liver and foods that are hard on the biliary system. You still have a biliary system. Treat it gently and feed it nourishing foods. Of particular importance is the understanding of good fats and harmful fats. Follow the links on gallbladder diet for more information on both of these.

    When should the gallbladder be removed?

    Many doctors recommend gallbladder removal if you have had only one attack. Others will do so if you have repeated attacks. Some will do so if you have stones; others will say unless you are having attacks with the stones you can leave it. This is a place to get a second opinion and above all, to educate yourself; read all you can.

    If your doctor finds that you have an infected gallbladder it will almost certainly have to come out. If it bursts you are in similar danger as with a burst appendix. Infection is then lose in the peritoneal cavity. This is like an explosion of infection from a place of contaiment to the body at large and is difficult to clean up.

    If you have a motility problem or a problem with gallbladder contraction (see biliary dyskinesia under gallbladder diseases) gallbladder surgery is also recommended. Some doctors do not recommend gallbladder removal for biliary dyskinesia.

    Complications of surgery

    Apart from complications of surgery such as damage to the common bile duct with laparoscopic surgery (due to lack of visibility) or infection from an incision, one may develop postcholecystectomy syndrome. (See below.)

    "During laparoscopic cholecystectomy, gallbladder perforation with leakage of bile and/or gallstones into the abdominal cavity occurs frequently." or 33% according to this study. However, there were no complications of infection or blockages in any of the subjects.(3)


    LIST OF POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS
    or LIFE AFTER GALLBLADDER SURGERY

    Abdominal pain, nausea, gas, bloating, and diarrhea are common following surgery. Postcholecystectomy syndrome (after gallbladder removal syndrome) may include all of the above symptoms plus indigestion, nausea, vomiting and constant pain in the upper right abdomen. Sound familiar? You're right -- gallbladder attack symptoms. Up to 40% of people who undergo gallbladder surgery will experience these symptoms for months or years after surgery. How is this possible? You no longer have a gallbladder and that was the problem, right? Look to the whole biliary tract. Now that the gallbladder is no longer present to act as a reservoir for bile, the common bile duct may expand as the bile backs up in the bile duct between the sphincter or muscular opening at the small intestine and the liver from which it flows. If it drips constantly into the small intestine this can cause problems of a different kind. However, this syndrome with accompanying pain appears to have the flow of bile obstructed by either a narrowing of the sphincter or a malfunction of the sphincter.(1)

    "Functional biliary pain in the absence of gallstone disease is a definite entity and a challenge for clinicians." which is to say that at this point in time, they don't really know what to do with gallbladder problems that aren't related to gallstones (2) and "Often, following cholecystectomy, biliary pain does not resolve..." (2) which means after gallbladder surgery you may just be stuck with the pain.

    So in conclusion, your best bet may be to try and fix what is wrong if that is possible, before taking it out. Sometimes, that is just not possible.

    Postcholecystectomy Diarrhea or Bile Dumping Syndrome

    The uncomfortable and inconvenient side effect that some people experience following the removal of their gallbladder is that of running to the bathroom immediately or soon after eating. For some it is rather explosive. Whatever its presentation, it is an increased transit time which means that absorption of nutrients is impaired. Not a good situation for your overall health. You may find help from the Dumping Syndrome Kit on this site. It helps to bind the bile salts that accumulate in the intestine along with extra fluid. However, this quote from a British medical journal suggests that perhaps IBS is part of the problem and may have been there, if somewhat less porblematic, before the surgery. If that is the case, try our Dumping Syndrome Kit, by all means. It can be helpful for all sorts of etiologies. But you may also want to read up on IBS and try some products specifically for an irritable bowel condition. I like the products at www.diverticulitisinfo.com.

    "13-40% of patients have persisting abdominal pain after cholecystectomy although the vast majority regard their operation as a success. Up to 12% of post-cholecystectomy patients when questioned feel that they have diarrhoea as a consequence of their operation, and at least 4-5% of patients have a definite deterioration in their perceived diarrhoea or perceive that they have developed diarrhoea for the first time. Objective assessments postoperatively, however, rarely demonstrate new onset diarrhoea. Some of these patients may have the irritable bowel syndrome."6

    IS THERE SOMETHING I COULD DO FOLLOWING GALLBLADDER REMOVAL THAT WOULD BE HELPFUL

    Of course! Always keep following a clean, sensible gallbladder diet that includes good fats, lots of organic fruits and vegetables and lean meats and fish. And for at least 2 or 3 months immediately afterwards, follow the diet religiously and if you haven't done a gallbladder starter it, do so now to give your digestion and your fat metabolism a kit start. I also suggest a series of coffee enemas about a month after surgery (even years after if it's been that long) to flush all the bile ducts including those of the liver. Your biliary tree can benefit from this at any time as can your liver. I suggest one per day, if possible, for 21 days.

    Then order the After Gallbladder Removal Kit and stay on it from now on. You will need the assistance in digestion that it offers, especially for digesting fats. That is the ideal. If it is beyond your means to do this, at least use bile salts with every meal.
    "I never saw a wild thing sorry for itself. A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough without ever having felt sorry for itself." -DH Lawrence
    "We do not see things as they are, we see things as we are." - The Talmud

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Maine... 100 miles inland in mountains
    Posts
    2,706
    Like so many diseases, by the time you experience symptoms, the disease has progressed to late stages. All organ systems have vast functional reserve so that deterioration can exact a large toll and you keep on ticking. Only when functional reserves are used up does the continually advancing deterioration begin to create noticeable symptoms. Gal bladder is an example of this. Symptoms indicate it is likely at an advanced disease state, thus surgery so common and often critically needed by that point. Plugged common bile duct backfeeds bile into the pancreas, eats that up, and can lead to death or at the very least a remaining lifetime of diabetes due to destruction of its islets of langerhans where insulin is produced. Rupture of a necrotic gal bladder can quickly lead to peritonitis, worse than being gut shot. Not worth experimenting with fringe methods that may work... or may fig you up bad

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    213
    Just an update...

    So my wife had hers removed a month ago...a few days ago I was going to come and post a thumbs up post but didnt find the time.

    Good thing I didn't because starting last night shes having the same exact pain again. Might have to go to emergency room.

    After searching in Google I see that there are countless folks with the same problem. Many horror stories.

    Doesn't seem to be any answer yet either.

    My wife eats really healthy too...mainly fruits and veggies today!

  35. #35
    Have her drink as much apple juice as she can,

    pears - look for the ones canned in pear juice and not syrup,

    and salad with vinegarette dressing only - no cheese and no creamy dressing.
    The gourmet salads are best, containing greens that look like dandelion leaves.

    She may have a stone in her ducts left over from when they took the gall bladder out. She will need tests at the hospital to find out where it's at and to remove it.

  36. #36
    bassaholic,

    I had my gallbladder removed around 7 years ago, and still have an "attack" about twice a year. Same exact pain as before, and the attacks last anwhere from 10 to 30 minutes. I have not been able to link them to any food in particular. I have mentioned them to my doctor, and he said that sometimes that happens. Not a very good answer in my opinion! I hope your wife feels better soon; the pain is like no other.

    PS I did find out that sadly I can no longer have margaritas and onion rings, at least at the same time!

  37. #37
    I flushed with grapfruit juice and olive oil. Three sessions. Stones came out and 48 hours later had a sonogram. Clean as a whistle. Docs were amazed.

  38. #38
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    213
    Yeah, the Dr did say a couple weeks after you might feel some pain if a stone or stones maid it into the ducts. He said they remove those by inserting a tube into stomach and working up into the ducts.

    She'll probably be having another ultrasound tomorrow...will call in morning.

    The thing about when she has this pain is that its like 8-12 hours, at least.

  39. #39
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    213
    Quote Originally Posted by TidesofTruth View Post
    I flushed with grapfruit juice and olive oil. Three sessions. Stones came out and 48 hours later had a sonogram. Clean as a whistle. Docs were amazed.
    Whats the flush procedure?

    We might as well try a flush now if a stone is already in the ducts.

  40. #40
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    213
    From doing some research it sounds like she could also have SOD (Sphincter of Oddi). It actually fits the bill more than a gallbladder attack.

    Its gonna be a long night.

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