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PREP Now FOX NEWS is catchin on... "How to stockpile food"
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    ex-NO, now in CA
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    4,250

    2 Now FOX NEWS is catchin on... "How to stockpile food"

    How to stockpile food

    Published March 26, 2012
    FoxNews.com
    http://www.foxnews.com/leisure/2012/...tockpile-food/

    Whether itís a hurricane or a broken leg, stockpiling food will ensure that you and your family are well prepared in case of emergency. Effective stockpiling requires preparation, prudence and forward thinking. Knowing which foods to buy and which to ignore will allow you to maximize your food supply during an emergency situation. It may seem like a drastic measure, but if you live in an area prone to heavy snow, floods or other natural disasters, stockpiling food is a responsible and important measure. Here are some tips to help ensure that you and your family well supplied for any situation.

    Essential Foods

    During an emergency, you may need to react quickly to a stressful situation or physically exert yourself more than usual, so nourishing your body with high-calorie foods may be essential. Peanut butter is the perfect stockpiling food as it is high in calories, fats and protein, has a long shelf life and doesnít require refrigeration. A good stockpile will include plenty of food that involves little or no preparation, such as canned soups, chili, nuts, fruits and vegetables. Itís also crucial to keep a large supply of clean bottled water. In a stressful situation, people can often take comfort in some of their favorite foods, so choose the foods you and your family enjoy whenever possible.

    Quantities

    Depending on the situation, you may be forced to rely on your stockpile for days, weeks or even months, so itís crucial to store enough food to tide your over. Try devising a set meal plan for one week and list the ingredients and quantities necessary. Then, multiply these quantities by four, for a monthís supply, or eight for a two-month stockpile. A disaster may strike while you have a visitor, so always be sure to keep extra supplies.

    Of course, purchasing such large quantities of food can be expensive. Thatís why itís best to build your stockpile over time, purchase foods with a long shelf life, and always look out for sales.

    Store Properly

    Create a permanent storage space in a cool and dry part of the house. Basements are usually great areas to house a stockpile, though you may wish to choose the attic if your basement is prone to flooding. If you wish to store meats, use a freezer, but be aware that you may not have an electricity supply to run it when you need it most. Vacuum packing certain foods will increase their shelf life

    Renew Stock When Necessary

    Your stockpile will be useless if your food spoils and becomes inedible. Thatís why itís essential to renew your food stock regularly. Make a list of expiration dates for each item that you buy and renew your supply of food whenever it becomes necessary. If your food stocks are approaching their expiration date, simply rotate them into your normal supply of food and replace them with fresh supplies.

    Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/leisure/2012/...#ixzz1qLUanHmv

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Columbia, Mo.
    Posts
    6,964
    Wow! I thought stockpilers were terrorists and wackos! Times are a' changin'!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    I'm Not Sure....
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    I have to say, I do like that cover on the Wheaties box in the picture of the article......
    ...Rubbin' is Racin'......

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    30 miles south of Texarkana, Texas
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    15,161
    Fox News 'BigWig'..."Well, we didn't know it would be war...but you can't say you weren't warned to prep..."

    Their 'As" are now covered...
    You say "trigger-happy cowboy" as if it were a bad thing.

    "If they come a'huntin' me; they can consider themselves lucky if they*don't* find me!"

    No surrender; no retreat!

    If we fight, victory is not certain. If we do not fight, defeat surely is.

  5. #5
    Ever think about which two or three foods you'd miss the most that don't really have acceptable canned alternatives?

    First one for me that I'd miss the most is Onions.
    Why they do store I'm not sure I'd be able to do so.
    Maybe a crawl space root cellar under house?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    21,791
    Double A... unless you're talking about using fresh onions for onion sandwiches, dried (not FREEZE dried, just plain dehydrated) onions are more than acceptable for almost any dish you use onions in...

    They store for years, they're cheap enough to buy, and very simple to dry yourself.

    OTOH, if you can grow a garden, there are varieties which store in the fresh state for months. Copra is THE best variety I've seen for long term storage... I store braids or bags of them in our cellarway (at the basement level, but on the kitchen side of the door to the basement, so it's slightly warmer and generally a little more humid than the basement proper) from harvest time in August until the following June. I'm not saying every single onion I store keeps that long, but we have fresh onions to use for at least 6 months. By then, chives and green onions are ready to use from the garden again...

    What's a little startling for me in that article on Fox is the "you might need to provide food for MONTHS". Wow!! Given the "official" line seems to be "don't worry, be happy, and keep enough food on hand for three days. Then FEMA will come riding to the rescue", this is quite a departure from the norm.

    Summerthyme

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    S.W. Mich. near South Bend, IN
    Posts
    3,822
    I agree that Copra onions are one of the best for storage.

    However, I also get Multiplier onions, which are planted in the fall, and ready to harvest about July. They last longer than any other onions, I think.....a bit smaller, but still quite nice. Each Multiplier onion plant produces "bulb" type onions, several per plant. They're also nice, because you can save some to replant, the fall after they mature.

    As far as I know, the only source for Multiplier Onion bulbs is Territorial Seed Co....a nursery in Oregon. A very reliable company. (They have two kinds,I like the kind that grow bulbs in the soil, not at the top of the plant.)
    Last edited by Michiana MaJo; 03-27-2012 at 05:25 PM.

  8. #8
    If Mulitplier onions are the same as Egyption walking onions, you can get them here..... www.Egyptianwalkingonion.com/home.htm

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    21,791
    They aren't, exactly. What Michiana MaJo is talking about are also called "potato onions". They grow sort of like garlic... one onion bulb becomes 5-7 bulbs at ground level. They are a good alternative to planting onions every year, although they're rather small. Mine died out :-(

    Summerthyme

  10. #10
    To add to the thread drift:

    I also lost my potato onions in the drought. I have ordered new ones from Southern Exposure Seed Exchange. Unfortunately they won't ship until late summer.

    There are many different varieties of multiplier onions and shallots available in the Seed Savers big book for those who are members. All will help with the onion "problem"...one which I have also considered.

    Yes, Copra is a great variety if you live in the northern part of the country.

    Onionwise the country is divided into 3 parts which overlap somewhat. There are long day onions (the north), intermediate (the middle) and short day (the south). As with so many other things onion varieties are location specific.

    LC

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    S.W. Mich. near South Bend, IN
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    3,822
    In the Territorial Seed catalog, I've seen them listed only as Multiplier onions. I've never seen the term "potato onions".

    It's true they are somewhat smaller than regular onions, but with adequate water and fertilizer (I just use fish emulsion), they get to a pretty nice size.

    Last summer, I didn't have as good a luck with them, as usual, but with such brutal heat and maybe? I didn't keep them watered enough, tho I tried, they didn't get as large as before. I planted a new supply, last fall. They're not cheap, tho!!!! But, if you can save enough to replant, you're ahead.This is how they're better than regular onions.

    The onions that grow above the ground are known as " Egyptian walking onions." The catalog says they form small bulbs underground, as well as small bulbs the size of hazelnuts on the tip of the stalk.

    I've never tried these, but my mom used to like them. I know that the Multiplier kind grows larger, and I prefer larger.

    Both kind are shipped in the fall, when they are to be planted.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    SE Mass.
    Posts
    843
    Whoa-the part about-you may need to have enough food for months caught my eye also....are they just jumping on the prepper craze band wagon? Or is there something else to this.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    I'm Not Sure....
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    Quote Originally Posted by CapeCMom View Post
    Whoa-the part about-you may need to have enough food for months caught my eye also....are they just jumping on the prepper craze band wagon? Or is there something else to this.
    Exactly, that's a lot more than the three days that has been recommended in the past.
    ...Rubbin' is Racin'......

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    30 miles south of Texarkana, Texas
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    15,161
    As I said eariler...CYA. They are 'covering theirs with this story.

    As for onions...find a patch of wild onions and transplant a few. In a year, you'll have more than enough of them to cover whatever 'dish' you desire. I had only a couple of them in the ditch out front by the road last year. Now, this year, the ditch is full and they are starting to invade my yard. Just imagine the 'tearful' act of mowing the ditch...
    You say "trigger-happy cowboy" as if it were a bad thing.

    "If they come a'huntin' me; they can consider themselves lucky if they*don't* find me!"

    No surrender; no retreat!

    If we fight, victory is not certain. If we do not fight, defeat surely is.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    SE Mass.
    Posts
    843
    I love my Egyptian Onions! Every Spring when I am cleaning out my flower beds I smile when I come across the onions-I can't see them at first-I SMELL them......YUM!

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