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HEALTH Miracle Drug, Chaga? Free.
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    A rough neighborhood in Hell.
    Posts
    6,475

    Miracle Drug, Chaga? Free.

    So, recently learning about Kombucha Tea, and found some infor about Chaga. I knew it was a fire-tinder mushroom, and see them all over, but never thought to eat/ drink it! I guess it makes a great tea and has SOME OF THE HIGHEST AND MOST VARIED #'S OF ANTIOXIDENTS USED BY MAN! pretty interesting, no wonder we haven't heard anything much about medical breakthrough.. like cannibis, can't patent them!

    Kombucha thread going in grannies kitches, I was hoping to get the word out about this to a wider audience, being as how its so good for you and FREE this is valuable info!!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaga_mushroom
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kombucha


    http://www.survivaltopics.com/surviv...inal-mushroom/

    Fair use, not for profit, for educational use, credit to author at link:

    The Chaga; Nature's Medicinal Mushroom
    More Articles Related to Wilderness Medicine

    Chaga Conk on a Yellow Birch


    Note: Some Survival Topics readers have read this article and then harvested as much Chaga as they could find, up to several hundred pounds, in the hopes of selling it - only to be disappointed when the market did not materialize.

    Rather than waste natural resources in an irresponsible manner, you are far better off to note the locations of any Chaga you find and harvest it only as needed. This eliminates waste, assures you of an always fresh supply, and limits your impact on the wild places you enjoy.

    Raping the forest and other natural resources in hopes of great profit is known as the "Tradgedy of the Commons". We see this same problem occuring in the ocean fisheries, for example, where irresponsible overfishing in the quest for monetary wealth has caused great environmental damage to the earth resources we all share and need to survive.

    Timeless Wisdom: "Take only what you need and leave the rest".

    Yesterday while snowshoeing I came upon a fine chaga conk or tinder fungus, known scientifically as the chaga mushroom Inonotus obliquus.

    The Chaga is such a valuable mushroom for wilderness survival and health I wanted to introduce Survival Topics readers to some of the ways in which it can be identified and used to help keep yourself in optimum health.

    Where Chaga Grows
    Siberians and other northern peoples in Asia, Europe, and North America for centuries have highly prized chaga for its great medicinal and curative powers. Those of us who know its value seek it out when traveling in the northern forest.

    Chaga is a parasitic carpophore that enters a wound on a mature tree, usually birch. The chaga grows under the bark and erupts into a grotesque black charcoal-like conk on the tree trunk; hence the Latin term "Obliquus" in its scientific name.

    The Chaga conk grows with the birch tree for five to seven years during which time it absorbs nutrients and phytochemicals from the wood. When the chaga conk flower ripens it falls to the forest floor. Usually the host tree then dies, completing a 20 year cycle.

    It is estimated that only about 0.025% of trees, only a few of every ten thousand, will grow a chaga conk. This makes the chaga mushroom somewhat rare even in its prime northern range.

    Identifying Chaga Mushrooms


    Chaga Conk
    The Chaga mushroom is a fungi that grows on the wounds of birches. Occasionally chaga is also found on ironwood, elm, alder and beeches but both paper birch and yellow birch seems to be its favorite.

    This Chaga tinder fungus I found while snowshoeing yesterday is growing on a large yellow-birch tree that had been damaged years ago during logging operations. The outside of this easy to identify mushroom somewhat resembles the charred remains of burnt wood, being black and crumbly.

    Of irregular shape, the inside of a chaga is the color of rusted iron or yellowish with white or cream colored veins. It is corky of texture and tends to become lighter in color closest to the tree. You can see the colors in third picture where I have pulled the chaga off the yellow birch tree using my tomahawk.

    Chaga is known as a polypore fungus, which means it has pores instead of gills. The chaga mushroom does not hold a great deal of water as does other types of mushrooms. As the chaga conk grows its outside dries out, turns black, and cracks. I have seen large Chagas well over three feet (one meter) in length and one foot (.33 meter) thick.

    The chaga mushroom is commonly known as the true “tinder fungus” for its use in building fires. In fact, chaga is the true tinder fungus, as opposed to the false tinder fungus which is shelf-like in shape and does not crumble.

    Wilderness Medicinal Mushroom
    Fire making aside, the chaga mushroom is also well known for its huge load of immune stimulating phytochemicals and betulin that can be consumed as a tea. Some of these compounds are derived from the birch tree and bark it consumes and concentrates in its flesh.

    The chaga fungus has some of the highest amounts of anti-oxidants of any substance consumed by man. Siberian folk medicine and modern uses of a tea made from Chaga fungus include:

    •boosting the immune system
    •treating stomach diseases
    •Intestinal worms
    •Liver and heart ailments
    •Cancers including those of the breast, liver, uterine, and gastric
    •Hypertension
    •Diabetes
    •anti-tumor activity
    •The active compound inotodiol which works against influenza A and B viruses and cancer cells.
    •Activity against HIV-1
    •As an anti-inflammatory
    Some experts claim the Chaga is the best anti-cancer mushroom of all.

    Properties and Ingredients of Chaga include:

    •Polysaccharides that enhance the immune system; treat cancer, live, HIV virus and other bacterial and viral infections.
    •Betulinic acid to counter viral infections and tumors
    •Triterpenes to lower cholesterol, improve circulation, detoxify the liver, treat hepatitis, bronchitis, asthma, and coughs.
    •Germanium (a free-radical scavenger) to cleanse the blood, normalize blood pressure, and prevent tumors.
    •Other nucleosides, phytonutrients, minerals, and amino acids including saponin, magnesium, chromium, iron, kalium, beta-glucan, inotodiol, isoprenoid, and others.
    How to Make Chaga Tea


    Harvesting Chaga
    “He could not imagine any greater joy than to go away into the woods for months on end, to break off this chaga, crumble it, boil it up on a campfire, drink it and get well like an animal. To walk through the forest for months, to know no other care than to get better! Just as a dog goes to search for some mysterious grass that will save him…”

    —From Cancer Ward by Alexander Solzhenitsyn”

    Some northern peoples are said to drink Chaga tea on a regular basis as Westerners do coffee and suffer very low cancer rates because of it. Chaga is a bit on the bitter side, rather like coffee, and cork-like in texture.

    When I come upon chaga in the forest I am apt to brake off a bit to chew on, and am sure to pack some away for use at home. With an item from nature’s free pharmacy that is this valuable to my health I make sure my chaga stocks are always full and take an extra hit when the opportunity presents itself. I don’t mind chewing on a bit of cork-like chaga conk since it is giving me a great boost of immune stimulating phytochemicals.

    Russian Chaga Tea
    This is perhaps the most written about method of making tea from chaga mushrooms:

    1.Shred the inner part of the Chaga mushroom.
    2.Soften in cold water for four hours.
    3.Filter with a coffee filter and save the liquid and the softened Chaga separately.
    4.Pour water heated to a temperature of about 50C (122F) over the softened chaga in a ratio of 5-parts water to 1-part fungus.
    5.Let stand at room temperature for 48-hours.
    6.Filter the new mixture and add this water to that prepared in step 3.
    7.Use this batch within four days, drinking 3-glasses at eight hour intervals each day. After four days make a new batch of chaga tea.
    Mushroom Hunters Chaga Method
    Vladimir of Mushroom Hunter dot net uses this method, which also shows you how to store chaga for extended periods:

    1.Remove the outer black part of the chaga using a chisel. It may help if you leave the chaga attached to the tree while you do this.
    2.Cut the clean chaga into 1-inch cubes.
    3.Dry the chaga cubes in a dehydrator at about 105 F.
    4.When completely dry put the cubes in an air-tight container where they can be stored for years.
    To use the chaga

    1.Bring two gallons (8 liters) of water to a boil.
    2.Let the water cool until you can touch the pot without it burning your hand.
    3.Put 3 or 4 handfuls of the chaga into the water.
    4.Cover the pot and let stand for 48-hours.
    5.Strain the liquid and store in a refrigerator.
    6.The cubes can be used at least two additional times.
    According to the Mushroom Hunter some people say boiling the chaga releases additional cancer fighting ingredients so he as a last step he boils the cubes to obtain the last bit of goodness.

    Chaga Liqueur
    1.Put 3 tablespoons of milled chaga into .5 liter vodka.
    2.Let sit for two weeks in a cool dark place.
    3.Filter.
    Chaga liqueur dosage is 3-tablespoons three to six times per day.

    Mushroom Hunters Lazy Man’s Chaga Tea
    The mushroom hunter and I agree; why go through all the bother of breaking off the hard black coating from the chaga mushrooms. Simply throw that in the pot too!

    1.Harvest chaga and allow to dry.
    2.Bring two gallons of water to a boil and drop in several handfuls of unprocessed chaga, black parts and all.
    3.Let steep for 48-hours.
    4.Strain into bottles and store in refrigerator.
    The Mushroom Hunter on Chaga
    Survival Topics recently received an email from Vlad The Mushroom Hunter with more information about the Chaga mushroom. He writes:

    "The specie name obliquus refers to way the pores of the fruiting body are positioned relative to the ground. In most of the polypores, the pores are positioned down to the ground. In the obliquus the pores are at an oblique angle to the ground; therefore the name.

    Chaga is not the fruiting body of Inonotus obliquus. The true fruiting body is hard to find and I have not, as yet, seen one, even in pictures.

    The scientists are not sure what the purpose of the Chaga is. Some people refer to it as a "Sterile Conch". This implies that there is a Fertile Conch, which is not true. The actual fruiting body is supposed to grow around where the Chaga grew when the tree was alive. It grows under the bark and slowly raises it until it cracks it. The oblique pores then release their spores and they fall out of the crack in the bark."

    The Chaga mushroom remains somewhat mysterious even to those who have are familiar with its habits. For me, that is part of the allure of this special fungus that is so useful for survival.

    If you are interested in more information about mushrooms and how you can use them be sure to visit the mushroom hunters website!

    Chaga Warning
    As with anything so good for your health, there is a great deal of hype about chaga. Exaggerated claims and expensive products manufactured from chaga are put out with the hope of luring your hard earned dollars in exhange for questionable products. For all you know, those chaga products hawked on the internet and elsewhere may be of dubious quality at best.

    If you are interested in acquiring high quality true Chaga for use as tinder or tea let me know and we can make arrangements to get you some. I am in the Great Northwoods forest of northern New Hampshire nearly every day and occasionally come upon this most useful of mushrooms. I’ll harvest some for you.

    Update: Survival Topics will harvest fresh mountain chaga for you - visit the Survival Shop for more information.

    In another Survival Topic I will discuss the use of the Chaga tinder fungus as fire making aid.
    If I was born in Kenya, I'd be President by now.

    *My fingers are slysdexic. Damn.*
    They're, there, their. There. I know the difference. My mind is miles and miles of thought ahead of my fingers and my fingers are peons. peons do sh!tty work.:D

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Beyond The Mystic
    Posts
    2,404
    Quote Originally Posted by BadMedicine View Post
    So, recently learning about Kombucha Tea, and found some infor about Chaga. I knew it was a fire-tinder mushroom, and see them all over, but never thought to eat/ drink it! I guess it makes a great tea and has SOME OF THE HIGHEST AND MOST VARIED #'S OF ANTIOXIDENTS USED BY MAN! pretty interesting, no wonder we haven't heard anything much about medical breakthrough.. like cannibis, can't patent them!

    Kombucha thread going in grannies kitches, I was hoping to get the word out about this to a wider audience, being as how its so good for you and FREE this is valuable info!!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaga_mushroom
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kombucha


    http://www.survivaltopics.com/surviv...inal-mushroom/

    Fair use, not for profit, for educational use, credit to author at link:

    The Chaga; Nature's Medicinal Mushroom
    More Articles Related to Wilderness Medicine

    Chaga Conk on a Yellow Birch


    Note: Some Survival Topics readers have read this article and then harvested as much Chaga as they could find, up to several hundred pounds, in the hopes of selling it - only to be disappointed when the market did not materialize.

    Rather than waste natural resources in an irresponsible manner, you are far better off to note the locations of any Chaga you find and harvest it only as needed. This eliminates waste, assures you of an always fresh supply, and limits your impact on the wild places you enjoy.

    Raping the forest and other natural resources in hopes of great profit is known as the "Tradgedy of the Commons". We see this same problem occuring in the ocean fisheries, for example, where irresponsible overfishing in the quest for monetary wealth has caused great environmental damage to the earth resources we all share and need to survive.

    Timeless Wisdom: "Take only what you need and leave the rest".

    Yesterday while snowshoeing I came upon a fine chaga conk or tinder fungus, known scientifically as the chaga mushroom Inonotus obliquus.

    The Chaga is such a valuable mushroom for wilderness survival and health I wanted to introduce Survival Topics readers to some of the ways in which it can be identified and used to help keep yourself in optimum health.

    Where Chaga Grows
    Siberians and other northern peoples in Asia, Europe, and North America for centuries have highly prized chaga for its great medicinal and curative powers. Those of us who know its value seek it out when traveling in the northern forest.

    Chaga is a parasitic carpophore that enters a wound on a mature tree, usually birch. The chaga grows under the bark and erupts into a grotesque black charcoal-like conk on the tree trunk; hence the Latin term "Obliquus" in its scientific name.

    The Chaga conk grows with the birch tree for five to seven years during which time it absorbs nutrients and phytochemicals from the wood. When the chaga conk flower ripens it falls to the forest floor. Usually the host tree then dies, completing a 20 year cycle.

    It is estimated that only about 0.025% of trees, only a few of every ten thousand, will grow a chaga conk. This makes the chaga mushroom somewhat rare even in its prime northern range.

    Identifying Chaga Mushrooms


    Chaga Conk
    The Chaga mushroom is a fungi that grows on the wounds of birches. Occasionally chaga is also found on ironwood, elm, alder and beeches but both paper birch and yellow birch seems to be its favorite.

    This Chaga tinder fungus I found while snowshoeing yesterday is growing on a large yellow-birch tree that had been damaged years ago during logging operations. The outside of this easy to identify mushroom somewhat resembles the charred remains of burnt wood, being black and crumbly.

    Of irregular shape, the inside of a chaga is the color of rusted iron or yellowish with white or cream colored veins. It is corky of texture and tends to become lighter in color closest to the tree. You can see the colors in third picture where I have pulled the chaga off the yellow birch tree using my tomahawk.

    Chaga is known as a polypore fungus, which means it has pores instead of gills. The chaga mushroom does not hold a great deal of water as does other types of mushrooms. As the chaga conk grows its outside dries out, turns black, and cracks. I have seen large Chagas well over three feet (one meter) in length and one foot (.33 meter) thick.

    The chaga mushroom is commonly known as the true “tinder fungus” for its use in building fires. In fact, chaga is the true tinder fungus, as opposed to the false tinder fungus which is shelf-like in shape and does not crumble.

    Wilderness Medicinal Mushroom
    Fire making aside, the chaga mushroom is also well known for its huge load of immune stimulating phytochemicals and betulin that can be consumed as a tea. Some of these compounds are derived from the birch tree and bark it consumes and concentrates in its flesh.

    The chaga fungus has some of the highest amounts of anti-oxidants of any substance consumed by man. Siberian folk medicine and modern uses of a tea made from Chaga fungus include:

    •boosting the immune system
    •treating stomach diseases
    •Intestinal worms
    •Liver and heart ailments
    •Cancers including those of the breast, liver, uterine, and gastric
    •Hypertension
    •Diabetes
    •anti-tumor activity
    •The active compound inotodiol which works against influenza A and B viruses and cancer cells.
    •Activity against HIV-1
    •As an anti-inflammatory
    Some experts claim the Chaga is the best anti-cancer mushroom of all.

    Properties and Ingredients of Chaga include:

    •Polysaccharides that enhance the immune system; treat cancer, live, HIV virus and other bacterial and viral infections.
    •Betulinic acid to counter viral infections and tumors
    •Triterpenes to lower cholesterol, improve circulation, detoxify the liver, treat hepatitis, bronchitis, asthma, and coughs.
    •Germanium (a free-radical scavenger) to cleanse the blood, normalize blood pressure, and prevent tumors.
    •Other nucleosides, phytonutrients, minerals, and amino acids including saponin, magnesium, chromium, iron, kalium, beta-glucan, inotodiol, isoprenoid, and others.
    How to Make Chaga Tea


    Harvesting Chaga
    “He could not imagine any greater joy than to go away into the woods for months on end, to break off this chaga, crumble it, boil it up on a campfire, drink it and get well like an animal. To walk through the forest for months, to know no other care than to get better! Just as a dog goes to search for some mysterious grass that will save him…”

    —From Cancer Ward by Alexander Solzhenitsyn”

    Some northern peoples are said to drink Chaga tea on a regular basis as Westerners do coffee and suffer very low cancer rates because of it. Chaga is a bit on the bitter side, rather like coffee, and cork-like in texture.

    When I come upon chaga in the forest I am apt to brake off a bit to chew on, and am sure to pack some away for use at home. With an item from nature’s free pharmacy that is this valuable to my health I make sure my chaga stocks are always full and take an extra hit when the opportunity presents itself. I don’t mind chewing on a bit of cork-like chaga conk since it is giving me a great boost of immune stimulating phytochemicals.

    Russian Chaga Tea
    This is perhaps the most written about method of making tea from chaga mushrooms:

    1.Shred the inner part of the Chaga mushroom.
    2.Soften in cold water for four hours.
    3.Filter with a coffee filter and save the liquid and the softened Chaga separately.
    4.Pour water heated to a temperature of about 50C (122F) over the softened chaga in a ratio of 5-parts water to 1-part fungus.
    5.Let stand at room temperature for 48-hours.
    6.Filter the new mixture and add this water to that prepared in step 3.
    7.Use this batch within four days, drinking 3-glasses at eight hour intervals each day. After four days make a new batch of chaga tea.
    Mushroom Hunters Chaga Method
    Vladimir of Mushroom Hunter dot net uses this method, which also shows you how to store chaga for extended periods:

    1.Remove the outer black part of the chaga using a chisel. It may help if you leave the chaga attached to the tree while you do this.
    2.Cut the clean chaga into 1-inch cubes.
    3.Dry the chaga cubes in a dehydrator at about 105 F.
    4.When completely dry put the cubes in an air-tight container where they can be stored for years.
    To use the chaga

    1.Bring two gallons (8 liters) of water to a boil.
    2.Let the water cool until you can touch the pot without it burning your hand.
    3.Put 3 or 4 handfuls of the chaga into the water.
    4.Cover the pot and let stand for 48-hours.
    5.Strain the liquid and store in a refrigerator.
    6.The cubes can be used at least two additional times.
    According to the Mushroom Hunter some people say boiling the chaga releases additional cancer fighting ingredients so he as a last step he boils the cubes to obtain the last bit of goodness.

    Chaga Liqueur
    1.Put 3 tablespoons of milled chaga into .5 liter vodka.
    2.Let sit for two weeks in a cool dark place.
    3.Filter.
    Chaga liqueur dosage is 3-tablespoons three to six times per day.

    Mushroom Hunters Lazy Man’s Chaga Tea
    The mushroom hunter and I agree; why go through all the bother of breaking off the hard black coating from the chaga mushrooms. Simply throw that in the pot too!

    1.Harvest chaga and allow to dry.
    2.Bring two gallons of water to a boil and drop in several handfuls of unprocessed chaga, black parts and all.
    3.Let steep for 48-hours.
    4.Strain into bottles and store in refrigerator.
    The Mushroom Hunter on Chaga
    Survival Topics recently received an email from Vlad The Mushroom Hunter with more information about the Chaga mushroom. He writes:

    "The specie name obliquus refers to way the pores of the fruiting body are positioned relative to the ground. In most of the polypores, the pores are positioned down to the ground. In the obliquus the pores are at an oblique angle to the ground; therefore the name.

    Chaga is not the fruiting body of Inonotus obliquus. The true fruiting body is hard to find and I have not, as yet, seen one, even in pictures.

    The scientists are not sure what the purpose of the Chaga is. Some people refer to it as a "Sterile Conch". This implies that there is a Fertile Conch, which is not true. The actual fruiting body is supposed to grow around where the Chaga grew when the tree was alive. It grows under the bark and slowly raises it until it cracks it. The oblique pores then release their spores and they fall out of the crack in the bark."

    The Chaga mushroom remains somewhat mysterious even to those who have are familiar with its habits. For me, that is part of the allure of this special fungus that is so useful for survival.

    If you are interested in more information about mushrooms and how you can use them be sure to visit the mushroom hunters website!

    Chaga Warning
    As with anything so good for your health, there is a great deal of hype about chaga. Exaggerated claims and expensive products manufactured from chaga are put out with the hope of luring your hard earned dollars in exhange for questionable products. For all you know, those chaga products hawked on the internet and elsewhere may be of dubious quality at best.

    If you are interested in acquiring high quality true Chaga for use as tinder or tea let me know and we can make arrangements to get you some. I am in the Great Northwoods forest of northern New Hampshire nearly every day and occasionally come upon this most useful of mushrooms. I’ll harvest some for you.

    Update: Survival Topics will harvest fresh mountain chaga for you - visit the Survival Shop for more information.

    In another Survival Topic I will discuss the use of the Chaga tinder fungus as fire making aid.
    Excellent Information, Thank you.
    Peace and Blessings,
    MCA
    Let me tell you something you already know. The world ain't all sunshine and rainbows. It's a very mean and nasty place and I don't care how tough you are it will beat you to your knees and keep you there permanently if you let it. You, me, or nobody is gonna hit as hard as life. But it ain't about how hard ya hit. It's about how hard you can get it and keep moving forward. -Rocky Balboa~

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
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    A Multi-Demensional Quantum Environment.
    Posts
    44,549
    marking for later.

    Last time anyone talked about harvesting mushrooms he wanted to go out to his family's cow pasture and did 'em out of the patties to get stoned. He was a strange dood. Good hearted but strange.

    I don't need a Catch-phrase. I'm Satanta. A Catch-phrase needs me.

    "It ain't no secret I didn't get these scars falling over in church."



    http://chronart.wix.com/chronart

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    NW MT
    Posts
    2,788
    I have to admit walking past this fungus many times while,hunting,fishing or cutting firewood and always thought it was some mechanism for the tree to heal itself. Now I'm going to have to harvest some and try it. Thanks BM!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Down in the hollow
    Posts
    16,802
    Good info, marking for later.
    "Dark and difficult times lie ahead. Soon we will all face the choice between what is right, and what is easy."
    Dumbledore to Harry Potter, Goblet of Fire.

    Luke 21:36

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    A rough neighborhood in Hell.
    Posts
    6,475
    You know what, I ran a search here for "Chaga" and got ZERO results. That hasn't happened before when I found something really cool and *new* to me. I can't believe a miracle drug and ancient fire-tinder has gone un-noticed here!! Glad yall are enthusiastic, I found this pretty cool wealth of info on it too. Chaga; KING OF HERBS!:

    http://www.chagamushroom.com/index.html
    If I was born in Kenya, I'd be President by now.

    *My fingers are slysdexic. Damn.*
    They're, there, their. There. I know the difference. My mind is miles and miles of thought ahead of my fingers and my fingers are peons. peons do sh!tty work.:D

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Montana - in the High Rockies
    Posts
    19,281

    ...........

    thanks for the inspiration. I've been trying to grow some kombacha from a drink I bought at the health food store, and though there is a touch of kombacha effervescence in the two jars, it really hasn't taken off,



    sooooo,


    moving into a warmer room (warmer because I have also started a British bitter, something I haven't done in years - the bitter is doing very well thank you, lol),


    so maybe the heat will help. keeping the place pretty kool during the winter doesn't help kombacha.


    I'll look for the fungi in the woods. I am sure I've passed plenty, but I am always leery of any fungi/mushroom I don't KNOW for sure.
    www.restartyl.com/donnorth

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    9,137
    I make kombacha. A friend mailed me a start for it. I make mine in apple juice. It grew really fast. I keep it in a sun tea jar in the dark in a lower cupboard. It's not hot in there. I keep my house temp around 66-68. The mushroom thingy grew so fast I had to take it out and put a small piece back and now it's huge.

    I do put it in a tea. I also put some of it in the water we feed to our chickens and barn cats. Before I had been buying Braggs organic vinegar. This is a cheaper option since I'm making it myself.

    I also grow kefir. She sent me starter grains for that too. I like it with my buttermilk. I hope all this stuff I'm doing keeps me healthy.

  9. #9
    I harvest my chaga in the UP on land owned by a friend. This is a piece from the last harvest in Nov. 09
    Attached Images

  10. #10
    I've posted a few times to people about the health benefits of "Ganoderma".
    This isn't free (it grows naturally in Asia mostly), but I take it in the coffee I drink, as well as the capsules for me and my whole family. I will attest to the incredible health benefits of it. I gave my 6 year old one capsule when he was running a high temp, with body aches and a stomach ache. It knocked it out in 15 minutes! Blew my mind! I have a ton of similar testimonies. I have a friend who bought some capsules for her brother who was recently diagnosed with cancer. They found a lump on his neck. He was still working at the time, but had difficulty even getting out of bed in the morning to go to work. Three day's on the ganoderma spore capsules and he was getting up, showering and at work by 7. He will not go without them now. He did go through radiation (not full chemo), and we are waiting to see if the cancer is gone. Do some research into this powerful herb. It's amazing.
    Here is one link to read up on it.
    http://foxnbcnews.com/ganoinfo.htm
    Cat

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    U.S.A.
    Posts
    2,502
    I'm curious, is there any 'danger' in collecting Chaga? For example, is there anything else that grows on Birch, which may look (to the newbie or uninformed) like Chaga, but could be something else which might be dangerous? Or, if you cut to deeply into the tree? Or, you accidentally cut off a "bad batch" which might contain something harmful (I don't know; bugs, virus, bad joojoo?)?

    Thanx,


    HB
    "The national budget must be balanced. The public debt must be reduced; the arrogance of the authorities must be moderated and controlled. Payments to foreign governments must be reduced, if the nation doesn't want to go bankrupt. People must again learn to work, instead of living on public assistance."
    Cicero, 55 BC
    Roman author, orator, & politician (106 BC - 43 BC)
    "The more things change, the more they stay the same." -- popular cliché

  12. #12
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    Dec 2001
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    A rough neighborhood in Hell.
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    I don't believe there to be anything harmful you can catch from birch or chaga.... in all the online reading I have done on it I think something might be mentioned if so. It is basically concentrated wood. Haven't collected much since the winter because I got some really nice ones early this year that I still have a lot of, but have been seeing many while out hunting. It's hard not to see and find them now!!
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  13. #13
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    I'm probly too far South to get any. Maybe on a photo trip I might get lucky. I think I've seen and photoed the stuff but thought it was rotten knotwood or something.

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    Turkey tail!! http://www.wildbranchmushrooms.com/turkey-tail

    Found a bunch of this while out hunting today. Saw a few fat chagas but they were higher than I can get without a ladder.. they have been marked for harvest at a later date

    Have been reading a bunch about birch polypore and polypore shelf mushrooms in general. MANY of them have cancer fighting properties of one sort or another and many of them are tumor reducing. Based on medical studies that show >1/3 americans will get cancer in their lifetime, and my personal; belief, we all have/ are devoloping cancer in some form/ at some rate... we jsut might be lucky enough to die from something else first... I am going to start implementing these into my diet. I already make chaga supplement gelcapos with cayanne for delivery, and have made some chaga/polypore caps, but have also found 4-mushroom tea bening sold as anti-cancer (and I would believe some carp scraped off a tree and bottled by rednecks before I believe the .gov and their paid assassins, the .med!! )

    Anyways, tons of good info, for peopke who haven't seen this thread, Chaga groes everywhere birch does, but the best is furthest north.

    Also read that mushrooms are one of natures highest sources of Vit D.. which we know to be huge in cancer prevention, as well as the 'sunlight' vitamin that wards off depression and other ailments. The further north you go, the less sunlight in the winter.. so just have to stock up all summer. I hope this is helpful.. I would reeeeeally liek to come upon some reishis!! Keeping my eyes peeled!

    Birch polypore link: http://weekendwoodsman.wordpress.com...irch-polypore/

    Turkey Tail Mushroom helps Immune system fight cancer Huffington Post: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/paul-s...b_1560691.html

    Fair use applies:


    Turkey Tail Mushrooms Help Immune System Fight Cancer
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    A promising clinical study shows that the turkey tail mushroom (Trametes versicolor) improves the immune systems of breast cancer patients. The multiyear study, funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), tracked whether or not turkey tails could positively affect the immune system of patients rebound after they ended their radiation therapy.

    Immunity -- as measured by the number of lymphocyte cells and natural killer cell activity -- usually declines dramatically after radiotherapy. Natural killer (NK) cells protect us from tumors and viruses. Researchers at the University of Minnesota Medical School and Bastyr University Research Institute hypothesized that breast cancer patients' health can be improved after radiation treatment if NK cell counts increased quickly to attack remaining cancerous cells.

    The study titled "Phase I Clinical Trial of Trametes versicolor in Women with Breast Cancer," recently published in the ISRN Oncology Journal, shows that turkey tail mushrooms can augment conventional therapies for treating breast cancer by increasing NK and CD8+T cell activity. This study suggests that turkey tail mushrooms are an effective adjunct to conventional chemotherapeutic medicines and radiation therapy. The authors concluded:

    ... research by our center continues to indicate that Trametes versicolor represents a novel immune therapy with significant applications in cancer treatment ... The CD8+ T cell counts over the 9-week dose escalation study were enhanced in the 9 gm Tv dose cohort compared to both the 3 g or 6 g group. One-way ANOVA was used to analyze the overall difference between dosage groups over the treatment period (2-4-6 weeks). It showed the statistically significant increase in the CD8+ cytotoxic T cells for the 9 g group compared to both the 3 g and 6 g group (F(2, 6) = 42.04, P = 0.0003).

    Due to its long history of therapeutic use, however, turkey tail prepared and packaged as an immune therapy drug is unlikely to be patentable, deterring big pharmas from conducting costly clinical studies. Typically, the longer the historical use of natural medicines for treating an ailment, the less likely derivatized drugs from these natural products will be patentable. To fill this research gap, the NIH established The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (www.nccam.nih.gov), which funded and oversaw this study. NIH's interest is not surprising -- more than 70 percent of new drugs are estimated to originate from natural sources.

    Turkey tail mushrooms have been used to treat various maladies for hundreds of years in Asia, Europe, and by indigenous peoples in North America. Records of turkey tail brewed as medicinal tea date from the early 15th century, during the Ming Dynasty in China. Our ancestors certainly encountered them and most likely explored their uses long before written history. Since the late 1960s, researchers in Japan have focused on how turkey tail benefits human health and how extracts of turkey tail can boost the immune system.

    What are turkey tail mushrooms?

    This super-abundant colorful mushroom grows on dead trees, logs, branches, and stumps. Turkey tail mushrooms are called bracket fungi, meaning that they form thin, leather-like and leaf-like structures in concentric circles. Rather than gills underneath, as in shiitake mushrooms, their undersides have tiny pores, which emit spores, placing them in the polypore family. These mushrooms grow throughout the world, practically wherever trees can be found. In fact, turkey tails are some of most common mushrooms found on wood on the planet.
    2012-05-31-TrametesversicolorLogOldgrowth.jpg
    Turkey tail mushrooms growing on a log in the old growth forest.


    They are commonly called "turkey tail" because their various colors: brown, orange, maroon, blue and green -- reminiscent of the plume of feathers in turkeys. In China, their common name is yun zhi. In Japan, this mushroom is known as kawaritake or "cloud mushrooms," invoking an image of swirling clouds overhead. In many Asian cultures, turkey tails' incurving cloud forms symbolize longevity and health, spiritual attunement and infinity.

    What are the medicinal properties and how is it used?

    Traditionally, our ancestors boiled mushrooms in water to make a soothing tea. Boiling served several purposes: killing contaminants, softening the flesh, and extracting the rich soluble polysaccharides. The mushrooms -- called fruiting bodies by mycologists -- are made of densely-compacted cobwebby cells called mycelium. With modern laboratory methods of cell tissue culture, the large-scale production of mycelium brought to light a whole new array of medicinal preparations. Nowadays, the commercial production of mycelium enables a cleaner and more digestible product than traditional mushroom preparations. Surprisingly, novel compounds are continually being discovered, which are not available using traditional preparations of the fruiting bodies, but are detectable within, and excreted from the rapidly growing mycelium.
    2012-05-31-HuffingtonBlueTurkeyTailTrametesversicolor.jpg
    Turkey Tail, Trametes versicolor, is so named for its wide variety of colors.


    The natural killer cells promoted by ingesting turkey tails also target virally-infected cells. Moreover, turkey tail mycelium excretes strong antiviral compounds, specifically active against Human papillomavirus (HPV), which causes cervical cancer, and hepatitis C virus (HEP-C), which causes liver cancer. Viruses that induce cancer are called "oncoviruses." The virus-to-cancer connection is where medicinal mushrooms offer unique opportunities for medical research. The current thinking amongst many researchers is that turkey tails and other medicinal mushrooms lessen the odds of getting cancer by reducing causal co-factors such as oncoviruses.

    Turkey tail is renowned in Asia as a source for cancer therapy. The Japanese company Kureha first screened many polypore mushrooms and found that turkey tails produced a profound immune response, a discovery confirmed by many other subsequent studies. The Kureha researchers received a patent for extracting both the mycelium and mushrooms in 1976 and derivative U.S. patents through 1981 (long since expired). The extraction method led to marketing "PSK" (polysaccharide Krestin®) and later "PSP," both protein-bound polysaccharides. PSK became recognized as a cancer drug in Japan and approved under somewhat controversial conditions. Before approving a foreign-made drug, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has many requirements. One is that the Active Principal Ingredient (API) needs to be disclosed. Therein lies the problem. PSK is an assortment of sugars and attached proteins but has no unique molecule responsible for its impact on the immune system. Without that API, verification from batch-to-batch is not possible. Thus, it is classified as an undefined drug. This is one reason why PSK cannot be legally imported nor marketed in the United States.

    What products are available in the U.S.?

    While the fractionated "drug" version of turkey tail, known as PSK, is not legal to sell in the U.S., the pure turkey tail product used in the U.S. NIH breast cancer clinical study is widely available from Fungi Perfecti (www.fungi.com) under the label "Host Defense." Since this turkey tail mycelium is presented in its unaltered form, it qualifies as a FDA approved "nutraceutical" ingredient. In this form, it can be advertised in the United States and Canada as a supplement to "support the immune system." Getting this nutraceutical on the shelves of health food stores lets physicians and patients access another tool to battle cancer. Enhancing the population and activity of NK cells and other lymphocytes and ensuring antioxidant effects against free radicals can both limit damage to healthy cells and reduce inflammation. These are some of the distinct advantages to using mushrooms in cancer therapy. Nature is a numbers game, and turkey tail helps tilt the balance in the complex battle to overcome cancer.

    Another factor to consider is that turkey tail mushrooms, like other varieties, can hyper-accumulate heavy metals, especially from air and soil pollution. Analyses of mushroom products from Asia, particularly Mainland China, have shown abnormally high levels of cadmium and other immuno-compromising metals -- not a good thing for people who want to bolster their immune defenses. This is one reason why it is important to find certified organic mushrooms and mushroom products. That said, another good characteristic of turkey tail and many other mushrooms like shiitake is that they can also accumulate selenium from the environment. When mercury meets selenium, they form a bimolecular unit that is totally non-toxic. This is why, whenever I eat fish, I like to have soup with organic shiitake -- or better yet, add turkey tails!
    2012-05-31-HuffingtonTrametesversicolorwithalgae.jpg
    Turkey Tail, as it ages, hosts algae and attracts insects.

    Wild turkey tail have a lifespan of a year or two at most, yet may persist years after they die, attracting and harboring successions of other organisms. Flat-footed flies, beetles and moths are super-attracted to the young turkey tail mushroom, so when you find these in the wild -- or grow them -- you often have an interesting community of co-existing organisms. Eventually the turkey tail, which has fine hairs on its upper sides, host algae communities, coloring the older mushrooms with tinges of green. (See above photo.) Because turkey tail is attractive to many other organisms, when you boil turkey tail mushrooms in water, you are probably extracting an assortment of other organisms in the process. In contrast, the mycelium can be grown under tightly-controlled clean room conditions, resulting in a more consistent, pure product.


    2012-05-31-HuffingtonDustyTrametesversicolor3.jpg

    Dusty Yao holds turkey tail mushrooms being grown on sawdust.

    What should you look for when buying a turkey tail product?

    1. Is the product U.S. certified organic? Make sure that there is a certifying agency on the label. Most consumers are not aware that seeing "organic" on the label, within a trademark, does not mean the mushrooms are organic. This is a common deception, and a subject of great controversy within the organic food and dietary supplement industry.

    2. Is this product backed up with scientifically-valid studies? Many companies base their claims on studies, which have used mushrooms that come from other sources than the ones supplying them. Products can vary substantially, dependent on the culture, the growing techniques and the production method. Since independent studies are costly and time-consuming, the majority of mushroom products simply cite pre-existing research conducted on the same species, but do not test the specific mushroom products they are marketing. If possible, choose products supported by validated scientific research.

    3. Where are the mushrooms grown and who grew them? Only skilled growers are aware of the many pitfalls in the process of cultivation. Make sure that not only a recognized expert supports the product but one with skills in cultivation. Most companies selling mushroom health supplements today buy on the spot-market, switching suppliers based on pricing and availability, from unknown sources. Companies typically hide their sources from consumers, saying this information is confidential. This gives companies leeway in switching suppliers, resulting in inconsistent quality. Consistency and purity are issues of concern. If you do not know where the mushroom products you are consuming are grown, think twice before eating them.

    More information synopsizing the many research articles on turkey tail mushrooms can be found here:

    MD Anderson Cancer Center: Coriolus versicolor Detailed Scientific Review -- http://www.mdanderson.org/education-...cientific.html

    American Cancer Society: http://www.cancer.org/Treatment/Trea...lus-versicolor

    To see Paul Stamets' TEDMED talk on the research on turkey tail and other medicinal mushrooms, see: www.fungi.com/tedmed


    Paul Stamets is a mycologist living in Kamilche Point, Wash. He is the author of six books on mushroom cultivation and identification, including "Growing Gourmet & Medicinal Mushrooms," "The Mushroom Cultivator" (co-author), and most recently "Mycelium Running: How Mushrooms Can Help Save the World." He has appeared at TED and TEDMED conferences, and runs a business whose website is www.fungi.com.

    Full disclosure: Paul Stamets and Fungi Perfecti, LLC supplied the turkey tail products used in the above clinical study.

    Photos by Paul Stamets.

    For more by Paul Stamets, click here.

    For more on natural health, click here.
    __________________________________________________ _____________________________

    Polypores on wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polypore

    Medicinal uses
    Main article: Medicinal mushrooms

    Edible polypores are commonly found in nature and according to mycologist Steve Brill, there are no reports of poisonous species.[17] Some polypores have been used in ritual and for utilitarian purposes for ages; the famous Ötzi the Iceman was found carrying two different polypore species, Piptoporus betulinus which was notable for its antibacterial properties,[citation needed] and Fomes fomentarius, which, although also having medicinal properties, was likely used for starting fires.[18]

    Two medicinal mushroom polypores in use today are Ganoderma lucidum coll. (reishi or lingzhi) and Trametes versicolor (turkey tail). Beyond their traditional use in herbal medicine, contemporary research has suggested many applications of polypores for the treatment of illnesses related to the immune system and cancer recovery.

    Several species have been studied for their ability to produce compounds with anti-pathogenic activity.[19][20][21][22][23]
    If I was born in Kenya, I'd be President by now.

    *My fingers are slysdexic. Damn.*
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  15. #15
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    BM that is a lot of interesting reading on the mushrooms. I'm in mid Michigan and have tons of various kinds of mushrooms growing in my woods. We have 20 acres of our property in woods and I know we do have a number of birch trees. I am afraid of wild mushrooming. I know lots of folks here in Michigan like to go hunting for the morels. I just don't trust my identification skills to not eat a poison mushroom. My brother in law was in the hospital once when they brought in two people who ate the wrong kind while they were out hunting and both of them died. They supposedly had been doing this for years and knew what they were doing.

    Do you ever get scared of what you find and eat? How can I get over this? I'm sure I have a lot of good fungi growing in the woods going to waste. You could come here and hunt all you want and teach me.

  16. #16
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    Ohhh that reminds me, I need to check on my kombucha mom I've been saving to make some new once things got settled in the new place. Hmm. I hope she's not frozen...

  17. #17
    Reminds me of oysters............was the first one to eat it foolhardy or just outrageously curious???............I am intimidated about 'shrooms/fungi in the wild.........I know there's some good.....but also not....be careful in what you consume...........just saying.........
    Sapphire

    myopically challenged

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by SAPPHIRE View Post
    Reminds me of oysters............was the first one to eat it foolhardy or just outrageously curious???............I am intimidated about 'shrooms/fungi in the wild.........I know there's some good.....but also not....be careful in what you consume...........just saying.........
    Reminds me of oyster mushrooms. I harvested a big one from a poplar stump just as it was getting really cold a couple of days ago. It was 22 degrees F at that point. The thing must have grown in the warm spell that we'd been experiencing until then.

    There are a lot of fungi that grow on wood that are thought to have very beneficial properties. Shitake, Lenticula elodes
    Reishi, Ganoderma lucida, Oyster, Pleurotus osteratus; Brick Cap Lentinula elodes; Mitake, aka Hen of the woods, Grifola frondosa all grow on wood. Wood-grown fungi as a group seem to have a disproportionate amount of medicinal properties. This short list is in no way all-inclusive.

    To keep yourself safe, you need to have a good set of reference books; two is good, there is better. Become familiar with look-a-likes. For example, Lentinula elodes could be mistaken for the Deadly Galerina G. marginata for example.

  19. #19
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    Fair use applies:

    http://www.chagamountain.com/health-benefits.html
    Health Benefits
    Health Benefits

    Chaga is one of the highest food antioxidants in the world!

    Click on the graph to your right ---------------->

    Chaga (Scientific Name: Inonotus Obliquus)

    Chaga is the most powerful sought after mushroom on earth. It’s one of the highest, if not the highest, antioxidants in the world and it’s documented extensively for having numerous health benefits, but it’s publicized mostly as an anti-cancer.

    Antioxidants

    Antioxidants are substances that protect cells from the damage caused by unstable molecules known as free radicals. Free radical damage can lead to cancer. Antioxidants interact with and stabilize free radicals and prevent some of the damage free radicals might otherwise cause. Examples of antioxidants include beta-carotene, lycopene, vitamins A, C and E and other substances. Beta-carotene is found in many foods that are orange in color, including Chaga.

    Anti-Cancer

    Betulinic acid, a constituent of Chaga, is cytotoxic and triggers apoptosis through a direct effect on the mitochondria of cancer cells. Other apoptosis-inducing factors result in cleavage of caspases and nuclear fragmentation. Like many medicinal mushrooms, Chaga is rich in beta glucans, which have immunomodulating activities. Beta glucans bind to Complement Receptor 3 (CR3) that allows the immune cells to recognize cancer cells as “non-self” A hot water extract of Chaga exhibited inhibitory and proapoptotic actions against colon cancer cell proliferation via up-regulation of Bax and caspase-3 and down-regulation of Bcl-2. For more information on betulinic acid, please go to our Science & Research Tab and read the following Elsevier Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters on New ionic derivatives of betulinic acid as highly potent anti-cancer agents, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, and Developing Novel Derivatives of Betulinic Acid for Fighting HIV.

    In addition to being used as an anti-cancer, Chaga has demonstrated anti-HIV, antibacterial, anti-malarial, anti-inflammatory and anthelmintic properties. Chaga is also antiviral, antifungal, antimicrobial and anti-Candida. Chaga is an immune system modulator as well as an adaptogen and has the highest level of superoxide dismutase or (SOD) detected in any food or herb in the world.

    Anti-HIV

    In 2005, published in The Pharmacological Potential of Mushrooms by Ulrike Lindequist et al., Water-soluble lignins isolated from Chaga, inhibited HIV protease with an IC 50 value of 2.5 mg ml_1. . Immunostimulation, other effects of the polysaccharide–protein complexes contribute to the antiviral activity, e.g. inhibition of binding of HIV-1 gp120 to immobilized CD4 receptor and of reverse transcriptase activity of viruses. Inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase was caused by velutin, a ribosome inactivating protein from Flammulina velutipes (M. A. Curtis: Fr.) P. Karst., as well. A total of 85% of responders reported an increased sense of well-being with regard to various symptoms and secondary diseases caused by HIV. Twenty patients showed an increase in CD4þ cell counts to 1.4–1.8 times and eight patients a decrease to 0.8–0.5 times.

    Antibacterial

    Chaga kills or inhibits growth or replication by destroying or suppressing reproduction of bacteria. The following are some properties in Chaga that are antibacterial: Betulinic Acid, copper, flavonoids, inotodiol, lanosterol, magnesium, melanin, pantothenic acid, phytonutrients, polysaccharides, saponins, selenium, sterols, tripeptides, triterpenes and zinc.

    Anti-Malarial

    There are many active constituents in Chaga that make it antimalarial, but the main biological activities are betulinic acid, saponins and triterpenes.

    Anti-Inflammatory

    The anti-inflammatory and pain relieving properties of Chaga are thought to be the inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). An extract of Chaga reduced the oxidative stress in lymphocytes from patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Anthelmintic Properties

    There are many active constituents in Chaga that make it anthelmintic, but the main biological activities are betulinic acid, saponins and triterpenes.

    Antiviral

    There are many active constituents in Chaga that make it antiviral, but the main biological activities are betulinic acid, saponins and triterpenes.

    Antifungal

    The following properties make Chaga an antifungal: beta glucans, betulinic acid, copper, enzymes, flavonoids, lanosterol, manganese, magnesium, pantothenic acid, phenols, polysaccharides, saponins, selenium, sterols, trametenolic acid, triterpenes, triterpenoids and zinc.

    Antimicrobial

    Antimicrobial properties in Chaga are amino acids, betulinic acid, chitin, copper, enzymes, flavonoids, inotodiols, lanosterol, manganese, magnesium, melanin, phenols, phytonutrients, polysaccharides, potassium, saponins, selenium, sterols, trametenolic acid, tripeptides, triterpenes, triterpenoids, vanillin and zinc.

    Anti-Candida

    Chaga promotes and protects the functions of the liver which busily processes Candida toxins.

    Chaga has properties that help to lower cholesterol, inflammation and blood pressure levels through sterols and triterpenes. Chaga contains B and D vitamins and lots of protein which promote relief from stress, depression and fatigue which Candida sufferers deal with.

    Immune System Modulator

    Chaga has potent immune supporting properties. Chaga is a rich source of beta glucans, and polysaccharides that are essential nutrients for the immune system. These polysaccharides have strong anti-inflammatory and immune balancing properties, enhancing the body’s ability to produce natural killer (NK) cells to battle infections. These polysaccharides are considered to be the primary active constituents of Chaga, at least from an immunological perspective. Upon ingestion, a range of secondary metabolites are produced, many of which are highly active as potent immune modulators. Chaga polysaccharides effectively promote macrophage (white blood cell) activation through the MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways, suggesting that Chaga polysaccharides help regulate the immune response of the body.

    Adaptogen

    Chaga is an adaptogen, which means its compounds increase the body's ability to adapt to stress, fatigue, anxiety and changing situations.

    Superoxide Dismutase (SOD)

    Chaga has the highest level of superoxide dismutase or (SOD) detected in any food or herb in the world! Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) is an enzyme that repairs cells and reduces the damage done to them by superoxide, the most common free radical in the body. SOD is found in both the dermis and the epidermis, and is key to the production of healthy fibroblasts (skin-building cells).

    Studies have shown that SOD acts as both an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory in the body, neutralizing the free radicals that can lead to wrinkles and precancerous cell changes. Researchers are currently studying the potential of superoxide dismutase as an anti-aging treatment, since it is now known that SOD levels drop while free radical levels increase as we age.

    Superoxide Dismutase helps the body use zinc, copper, and manganese. There are two types of SOD: copper/zinc (Cu/Zn) SOD and manganese (Mn) SOD. Each type of SOD plays a different role in keeping cells healthy. Cu/Zn SOD protects the cells’ cytoplasm, and Mn SOD protects their mitochondria from free radical damage.

    Superoxide Dismutase has also been used to treat arthritis, prostate problems, corneal ulcers, burn injuries, inflammatory diseases, inflammatory bowel disease, and long-term damage from exposure to smoke and radiation, and to prevent side effects of cancer drugs. In its topical form, it may help to reduce facial wrinkles, scar tissue, heal wounds and burns, lighten dark or hyperpigmentation, and protect against harmful UV rays.

    Active Constituents of Chaga

    The active constituents of Chaga are thought to be a combination of Amino Acids, Beta Glucans, Betulinic Acid, Calcium, Chloride, Copper, Dietary Fiber, Enzymes, Flavonoids, Germanium, Inotodiols, Iron, Lanosterol, Manganese, Magnesium, Melanin, Pantothenic Acid, Phenols, Phosphorus, Phytonutrients, Polysaccharides, Potassium, Saponins, Selenium, Sodium, Sterols, Trametenolic Acid, Tripeptides, Triterpenes, Triterpenoids, Vanillic Acid, Vitamin B1 (Thiamine), Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin), Vitamin B3 (Niacin), Vitamin D2 (Ergosterol), Vitamin K and Zinc.

    Amino Acids

    Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins. Amino acids and proteins are the building blocks of life. When proteins are digested or broken down, amino acids are left. The human body needs a number of amino acids to:

    • Break down food • Grow • Repair body tissue • Perform many other body functions

    Beta Glucans

    Beta glucans are used for high cholesterol, diabetes, cancer, and HIV/AIDS. Beta glucans are also used to boost the immune system in people whose body defenses have been weakened by conditions such as chronic fatigue syndrome, or physical and emotional stress; or by treatments such as radiation or chemotherapy. Beta glucans are also used for colds (common cold), flu (influenza), H1N1 (swine) flu, allergies, hepatitis, Lyme disease, asthma, ear infections, aging, ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis.

    Betulinic Acid

    Betulinic acid is a natural pentacyclic lupane-type triterpene that is found in Chaga, as well as other various plants, including birch trees. This compound and its derivatives possess many favorable biological properties such as anti-cancer, anti-HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus type-1), antibacterial, anti-malarial, anti-inflammatory, and anthelmintic activities. Betulinic acid was initially known for its high cytotoxicity against human melanoma cancer cells, but later studies also suggest this compound being a broad inhibitor of other cancerous tumors including aneuroectodermal tumors (such as neuroblastoma, medulloblastoma, glioblastoma and Ewing’s sarcoma), brain-tumors, human gliomas, leukemia, human colon carcinoma and human prostate adenocarcinoma, head and neck squamous carcinoma cells, lung, colorectal, breast, and cervical cancer.

    Calcium

    One of the most abundant minerals in the human body, calcium accounts for approximately 1.5% of total body weight. Bones and teeth house 99% of the calcium in the body, while the remaining 1% is distributed in other areas.

    Calcium is best known for its role in maintaining the strength and density of bones. In a process known as bone mineralization, calcium and phosphorus join to form calcium phosphate. Calcium phosphate is a major component of the mineral complex (called hydroxyapatite) that gives structure and strength to bones.

    Calcium also plays a role in many physiological activities not related to bones including blood clotting, nerve conduction, muscle contraction, regulation of enzyme activity, and cell membrane function. Because these physiological activities are essential to life, the body utilizes complex regulatory systems to tightly control the amount of calcium in the blood so that calcium is available for these activities. As a result, when dietary intake of calcium is too low to maintain normal blood levels of calcium, the body will draw on calcium stores in the bones to maintain normal blood concentrations, which, after many years, can lead to osteoporosis.

    Chloride

    Chloride is one of the most important electrolytes in the blood. It helps keep the amount of fluid inside and outside of your cells in balance. It also helps maintain proper blood volume, blood pressure, and pH of your body fluids.

    Copper

    Copper is a natural element that is an essential micronutrient to ensure the well-being of all aerobic life forms. It plays a vital part in the development and performance of the human nervous and cardiovascular systems, as well as the skin, bone, immune and reproductive systems, including gene transcription. Copper can also inhibit the growth of microbes, thus providing a measure of protection against harmful germs and bacteria in many environments. Copper has been found useful for its healing powers—largely due to its antibacterial and antifungal properties—in the treatment of wounds and skin diseases. Present in our bodies from conception, copper helps form a developing infant’s heart, skeletal and nervous systems, as well as arteries and blood vessels. Copper continues to play a vital role as we age – keeping our hair and skin in good condition while repairing and maintaining connective tissue in our hearts and arteries. It also facilitates absorption and utilization of iron and enables cells to use the energy present in carbohydrates, proteins and fats.

    Dietary Fiber

    Dietary fiber intake provides many health benefits. However, average fiber intakes for US children and adults are less than half of the recommended levels. Individuals with high intakes of dietary fiber appear to be at significantly lower risk for developing coronary heart disease, stroke, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, and certain gastrointestinal diseases. Increasing fiber intake lowers blood pressure and serum cholesterol levels. Increased intake of soluble fiber improves glycemia and insulin sensitivity in non-diabetic and diabetic individuals. Fiber supplementation in obese individuals significantly enhances weight loss. Increased fiber intake benefits a number of gastrointestinal disorders including the following: gastroesophageal reflux disease, duodenal ulcer, diverticulitis, constipation, and hemorrhoids. Prebiotic fibers appear to enhance immune function. Dietary fiber intake provides similar benefits for children as for adults.

    Enzymes

    Enzymes are energized protein molecules found in all living cells. They catalyze and regulate all biochemical reactions that occur within the human body. They are also instrumental in digestion. They break down proteins, fats, carbohydrates and fiber making it possible to benefit from the nutrients found in those foods while removing the toxins. Enzymes turn the food we eat into energy and unlock this energy for use in the body. Their presence and strength can be determined by improved blood and immune system functions.

    Flavonoids

    Flavonoids are polyphenols abundantly found in fruits, vegetables, and herbs. They are a diverse group of phytochemicals, exceeding four thousand in number. From human nutrition perspective, flavonoids are important components of a healthy diet because of their antioxidant activity. Nevertheless, the antioxidant potency and specific effect of flavonoids in promoting human health varies depending on the flavonoid type (chemical, physical, and structural properties). Among the potent antioxidant flavonoid types are quercetin, catechins and xanthohumol. Flavonoid science is a research area rapidly gaining deeper insight on the health benefit and chemical property of flavonoids.

    Beneficial effects of flavonoids on human health are partly explained by their antioxidant activity. Because of the antioxidative property, it is suggested that flavonoids may delay or prevent the onset of diseases (such as cancer) induced by free radicals. They also inhibit low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation by free radicals. Flavonoids have been reported to have negative correlation with incidence of coronary heart disease. Furthermore, flavonoids have anti-bacterial, anti-viral, anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, antiallergenic, and vasodilatory effect. They also inhibit platelet aggregation.

    Germanium

    Nutritionally, the natural element germanium has been known to aid in the prevention of cancer and AIDS. Certain compounds of germanium have toxic effects against certain bacteria. In its organic form, germanium is being hailed as one of the greatest new developments in the nutritional treatment of cancer. The estimated daily intake for germanium is 1 mg. Germanium has been reported to improve the immune system, boost the body's oxygen supply, make a person feel more energetic, and destroy damaging free radicals. Germanium also protects against radiation.

    Organic germanium is a biological-response modifier. This means it enables the body to change its response to tumors, which has therapeutic benefits. Germanium does not directly attack cancer cells, but stimulates the body's immune system, making it effective in the treatment of cancer as well as other degenerative diseases.

    A number of human cancer trials have been conducted with organic germanium. A summary of Phase I and Phase II human clinical trials reveals that orally administered organic germanium induces interferon production, restores previously impaired immune response, and has shown extremely low toxicity.

    Inotodiol

    Inotodiol and trametenolic acid are considered to be the main bioactive compounds of the fruiting body of the mushroom. These compounds show various biological activities, including anti-tumour, anti-viral, hypoglycaemic, anti-oxidant and cyto-protective. Inotodiol has shown activity against influenza (flu) viruses A and B and various cancer cells. Inotodiols extracted from Chaga exhibit anti-tumor properties, destroying Walker 256 Carcinosarcoma cancer cells and MCF-7 human adenocarcinoma mammary cells. Institutional studies at the University of Tokyo, Japan have determined the effective destruction of certain cancerous carcinosarcomas and mammary adenocarcinomas.

    Iron

    Iron is a mineral essential for life. It is present in every living cell and is necessary for the production of hemoglobin (primary component of red blood cells), myoglobin (major protein of muscle cells), and certain enzymes. Iron, along with calcium, are the two major deficiencies of American women (one of the reasons due to menstruation and bleeding), and this deficiency can cause weakness, inability to concentrate, the susceptibility to infection, impaired performance, and in general, ill health. Other people at risk of iron deficiency include dieters, vegetarians and athletes. Calcium and copper must be present for iron to function properly, and ascorbic acid (vitamin c) enhances absorption. Iron is necessary for proper metabolization of B vitamins.

    Lanosterol

    Lanosterols exhibit strong cytotoxicity towards carcinoma cells. It’s also an anti-bacterial, lowers cholesterol and reduces candida.

    Manganese

    Manganese is a mineral and trace element that plays many essential roles in the body. It aids in the metabolism of food, normal functioning of the nervous system, in the formation of the thyroxine hormone for the thyroid gland, and in the production of sex hormones. Manganese works as an antioxidant to help prevent cancer and heart disease.

    Manganese helps activate enzymes needed for use of biotin, B-1 (thiamin), and vitamin C. It's important for the formation of thyroxine, the main hormone of the thyroid gland. Manganese is essential for proper digestion and the metabolization of proteins. Manganese also plays an important role in digestion and utilization of food, reproduction, normal bone structure, and normal functioning of the central nervous system.

    Magnesium

    Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral in the body and is essential to good health. Approximately 50% of total body magnesium is found in bone. The other half is found predominantly inside cells of body tissues and organs. Only 1% of magnesium is found in blood, but the body works very hard to keep blood levels of magnesium constant.

    The crucial health benefits of magnesium include solving or preventing osteoporosis, heart attacks, hypertension, constipation, migraines, leg cramps, kidney stones, gallstones and more. Magnesium is an essential part of the alternative health approaches of alternative medicine.

    Melanin

    Melanin is a natural substance that gives color (pigment) to hair, skin, and the iris of the eye. It is produced by cells in the skin called melanocytes. Melanin also helps protect the skin from the sun. Increased melanin protects those who have it from short-term damage from the sun, as well as the long-term signs of aging, such as age spots, deep wrinkles and rough texture. Free radicals have been implicated as the cause of widespread damage to human cells. Melanin plays a role in free scavenging radicals and preventing skin damage they can cause. It affects the delicately designed lipids that hold moisture in the stratum corneum. This is the outermost layer of the epidermis. If the skin loses its moisture, it becomes rigid and cracks.
    If I was born in Kenya, I'd be President by now.

    *My fingers are slysdexic. Damn.*
    They're, there, their. There. I know the difference. My mind is miles and miles of thought ahead of my fingers and my fingers are peons. peons do sh!tty work.:D

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    A rough neighborhood in Hell.
    Posts
    6,475
    Continued...


    fair use applies:

    Pantothenic Acid

    The health benefits of Vitamin B5 or Pantothenic Acid include alleviation of conditions like asthma, hair loss, allergies, stress and anxiety, respiratory disorders and heart problems. Also, it helps to improve immunity, osteoarthritis, ageing signs, resistance to various types of infections, physical growth, and diabetes and skin disorders. Vitamin B5 is widely known to be an obstacle to serious mental states like stress and anxiety. A customary diet must contain recommended amount of Vitamin B5 to ensure good health and proper functioning of each body part. It performs wide variety of functions in our body, starting from production of neurotransmitter in brain to fabrication of steroids to extraction of fats, proteins and other vital nutrients. In a nutshell, the essence of Vitamin B5 pats every important aspect of keeping a good health.

    Phenols

    Phenols are compounds found in a wide variety of foods ranging from Chaga to olive oil to green tea and almonds. The antioxidant and antibacterial properties of phenols benefit a wide variety of diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and Alzheimer’s Disease. Phenols are thought to be the primary health benefit of olive oil consumption, with benefits seen for breast cell health, bone health, and cholesterol health.

    Phosphorus

    Phosphorus is the second most abundant mineral in the body and 85% of it is found in the bones. The rest of the body's phosphorus is found in the blood, the fluid around and in cells, and in various organs like the heart, kidneys, brain, and muscles, where it is involved in many critical functions. Its main purpose is for building strong bones and teeth, but this mineral is used by practically every cell in the body.

    Phosphorus is involved in virtually all physiological chemical reactions in the body, and calcium and Vitamin D are essential to proper functioning of the phosphorus. This mineral protects and strengthens cell membranes, assists other nutrients, hormones, and chemicals in their bodily processes, and is necessary for normal bone and tooth structure. Phosphorus is needed for healthy nerve impulses, normal kidney functioning, and the utilization of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins for growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and for energy production. Phosphorus is a component of DNA and RNA and serves in the preparation of glucose for energy formation.

    Phytonutrients

    Apart from the major food principles like protein, carbohydrates, and fats, large number of food items we consume consists of invaluable components in them known as phytonutrients or plant derived chemical substances. Although their caloric value is insignificant, inclusion in our diet in adequate levels is imperative since the potential benefits in terms of direct contribution to health promotion and disease prevention are enormous.

    Studies have found that certain chemicals other than nutritional principles in them have anti-mutagenic, free radical scavenging and immunity boosting functions, which help promote health and prevent diseases, over and above their nutritive value. Phytonutrients are present abundantly in the plant world.

    Examples include:

    1. Anti-oxidants 2. Phyto-sterols (plant sterols) 3. Non-digestible carbohydrates such as tannins, pectin, cellulose and mucilage 4. Natural acids 5. Enzymes and lecithin.

    Polysaccharides

    Polysaccharides have many chains and must be broken down into smaller portions before they can be fully digested. Although polysaccharides are a form of sugar, many of their food sources rarely taste sweet.

    Polysaccharides are important in the prevention of degenerative type diseases. These include cardiovascular disease and diabetes type 2. Tea action is related to the poly-phenols and polysaccharides parts of tea.

    Polysaccharides can also act as an anticoagulant. It reduces the stickiness of platelets making it harder for them to build up in artery walls. They have anti-thrombotic effects and blood lipids are reduced. HDL cholesterol may be raised while LDL levels are decreased.

    Polysaccharides help to regulate immune function with T and B lymphocyte activation. It promotes Interferon, a white cell medium and tumor necrosis (death).

    Tea polysaccharides have the following effects. They lower blood pressure and increase coronary artery capacity. Blood sugar levels are reduced which is a benefit in treating Diabetics. There is improved Beta cell function in the pancreas, as well as anti-diabetic properties. Anti-radiation effects may be noted, and free radicals can be all but eliminated. There is anti-viral activity, and it improves blood reproduction and maintenance.

    Potassium

    Potassium, the third most abundant mineral in human body, is the synonym for health insurer. It contains the qualities for maintaining a high level of human well-being and a cheerful lifestyle. There is no way one should overlook the inclusion of potassium in routine diet plan. Apart from acting as an electrolyte, this mineral is required for keeping heart, brain, kidney, muscle tissues and other important organs of human body in good condition. Potassium chloride is the main variety of this mineral amongst others. It works in association with sodium to perform a number of critical body tasks.

    The health benefits of potassium include stroke, blood pressure, anxiety and stress, muscular strength, metabolism, heart and kidney disorders, water balance, electrolytic functions, nervous system and other general health benefits of potassium.

    Saponins

    Saponins are a group of chemicals with detergent-like properties that plants produce to help them resist microbial pathogens such as fungi.

    Saponins may reduce elevated cholesterol levels by forming complexes with cholesterol and bile acids, which prevents them from being absorbed through your small intestines. The cholesterol and bile complexes are excreted in the stool, which lowers cholesterol levels in the blood and liver.

    Saponins may decrease your risk of cancer. A 2004 study published in "Journal of Medicinal Food" says colon, breast, uterine and prostate cancer rates are lower in countries where inhabitants consume large amounts of legumes. This may be due to the immune system modulating effects of saponins that increase anti-tumor activity in your body. The stimulation of bile acid secretion in the intestinal tract, and antioxidant activity may also contribute to a reduced risk of cancer.

    Antioxidants prevent cell damage by protecting lipids from free radical oxidation reactions. Saponins prevent oxidation of cholesterol in the colon, which may also help to reduce colon damage and the risk of cancer. They also prevent degeneration of DNA and protect cell proteins from free radical damage.

    Saponins may stimulate the immune system, and according to the 2004 article referenced earlier, they are used as adjuvants in vaccines and oral intakes of saponins have been used to help treat retroviral infection. They stimulate antibody production, inhibit viruses, and induce the response by lymphocytes, which are white blood cells that fight infection.

    Selenium

    Selenium is a trace element found in soil and is required to maintain good health in trace amounts.

    Selenium aids in many of the metabolic pathways and may help treat prostate cancer; ongoing research is exploring the relationship between low selenium levels and coronary heart disease.

    Selenium also benefits the skin during healing following burn injuries. Shampoo with selenium may alleviate dandruff problems. For skin care, selenium’s antioxidant properties regenerate vitamins E and C, thereby decreasing the aging of skin.

    Major benefits of selenium have been found to improve the immune system against bacterial and viral infections, against cancer cells and herpes virus, cold sores, and shingles. One of the major nutritional benefits of selenium is increasing the HDL cholesterol to LDL cholesterol for a healthy heart.

    Sodium

    Sodium occurs naturally in most foods. The most common form of sodium is sodium chloride, which is table salt. Sodium is an element that the body needs to function properly. The body uses sodium to regulate blood pressure and blood volume. Sodium is also critical for the functioning of muscles and nerves.

    Sterols

    Plant sterols and stanols are naturally occurring substances found in plants. Research has shown that plant sterols/stanols included with a heart healthy eating plan may reduce your risk for heart disease. The sterols/stanols work by blocking the absorption of cholesterol in the small intestine. This lowers the low density cholesterol known as the 'bad' cholesterol (LDL ) by 6-15%, without lowering the good cholesterol known as the high density cholesterol ( HDL). Clinical research trials have documented safety and effectiveness for use by the entire family. Plant stanols/sterols do not interfere with cholesterol lowering medications.

    Trametenolic Acid

    Inotodiol and trametenolic acid are considered to be the main bioactive compounds of the fruiting body of the mushroom. These compounds show various biological activities, including anti-tumour, anti-viral, hypoglycaemic, anti-oxidant and cyto-protective.

    Tripeptides

    A tripeptide is a type of peptide that is formed when amino acids link together in a specific order. Each tripeptide contains three different amino acids. These amino acids are joined by a peptide bond, which is a chemical bond that occurs between two molecules. A common tripeptide is isoleucine-proline-proline, also called the milk peptide, which is responsible for keeping blood pressure low and stable.

    The main function of tripeptides is cell communication. They also contribute to body functions such as blood pressure regulation and thyroid function. As tripeptides age, however, communication signals may start to deteriorate, which can cause signs of aging and other health issues.

    Another type of tripeptide is glutathione which is an anti-oxidant that can be critical in protecting healthy cells from free radicals in the body. Free radicals can cause cell damage that is linked to the development of cancer cells. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) is a tripeptide responsible for regulating the release of hormones in the thyroid.

    Tripeptides have become popular with cosmetic companies who are creating anti-aging products. Since the body uses tripeptides for communication, anti-aging proponents believe that topical forms of tripeptides can boost skin function and reverse damage to the skin. This essentially gives cells back their youth and prevents improper cell communication in the skin. Anti-aging product manufactures claim that tripetides used in these products improve the skin’s appearance, making it smooth and soft.

    Tripeptide-3 and tripeptide-1 are the common ingredients used in these products, and are believed to stimulate skin cells and produce more collagen. Due to the fact that tripeptides usually are not cheap to produce, consumers typically can expect to pay larger sums for products with these active ingredients.

    Triterpenes

    Triterpenes are found in all living organisms: plants, animals, humans. Triterpenes are precursors to steroids – in order to produce steroids, the organism, whether plant or animal produces triterpenes. Naturally occurring precursors to steroids and naturally occurring steroids are the plant and animal worlds’ way of managing inflammation, safely and naturally. Triterpenes belong to a large group of compounds arranged in a four or five ring configuration of 30 carbons with several oxygens attached. Triterpenes are assembled from a C5 isoprene unit through the cytosolic mevalonate pathway to make a C30 compound and are steroidal in nature. Cholesterol is one example of a triterpene. Phytosterols and phytoecdysteroids are also triterpenes. The triterpenes are subdivided into some 20 groups, depending on their particular structures. Though all terpenoid compounds have bioactivity in mammals, it is the triterpenes that are most important to the adaptogenic effect found in plants such as Chaga, ginseng or Eleutherococcus senticosus.

    Triterpenoids

    Triterpenoid saponins are triterpenes which belong to the group of saponin compounds.

    Triterpenoids Display Single Agent Anti-tumor Activity in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Small B Cell Lymphoma.

    Vanillic Acid

    Vanillic acid is a benzoic acid derivative used as a flavoring agent. It is an oxidized form of vanillin produced during the conversion of vanillin to ferulic acid. The highest quantity of vanillic acid in plants has been found in the roots of Angelica sinensis, which is used in traditional Chinese medicine. Various studies have provided evidence of the effectiveness of vanillic acid in the management of immune or inflammatory responses. For instance, vanillic acid enhanced the activity of human lymphocyte proliferation and secretion of interferon-gamma in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Another study has shown that vanillic acid has a hepatoprotective effect through its suppressive action on immune-mediated liver inflammation in concanavalin A-induced liver injury. However, it remains to be determined whether vanillic acid has an anti-colitic effect.

    A study on was done to determine whether vanillic acid has beneficial effects against dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced ulcerative colitis. The results showed that vanillic acid reduced the severity of the clinical signs of DSS-induced colitis, including weight loss and shortening of colon length, and the disease activity index. The results of this study showed that vanillic acid significantly suppressed the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and the activation of transcription nuclear factor-B p65 in DSS treated colon tissues. In addition, we observed that the plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-6 were higher in the DSS-treated group than in the control group, but these increased levels were reduced by the administration of vanillic acid. Taken together, these findings suggest that vanillic acid has a beneficial effect on DSS-induced ulcerative colitis, thereby indicating its usefulness in the regulation of chronic intestinal inflammation.

    Vitamin B1 (Thiamine)

    Vitamin B1 (Thiamine) is a vitamin that is required by your body to turn carbohydrates into a form of energy usable within your cells.

    Thiamine is also used for digestive problems including poor appetite, ulcerative colitis, and ongoing diarrhea.

    Thiamine is also used for AIDS and boosting the immune system, diabetic pain, heart disease, alcoholism, aging, a type of brain damage called cerebellar syndrome, canker sores, vision problems such as cataracts and glaucoma, motion sickness, and improving athletic performance. Other uses include preventing cervical cancer and progression of kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Some people use thiamine for maintaining a positive mental attitude; enhancing learning abilities; increasing energy; fighting stress; and preventing memory loss, including Alzheimer's disease.



    Healthcare providers give thiamine shots for a memory disorder called Wernicke's encephalopathy syndrome, other thiamine deficiency syndromes in critically ill people, alcohol withdrawal, and coma.

    Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)

    Riboflavin (vitamin B2) is manufactured in the body by the intestinal flora and is easily absorbed, although very small quantities are stored, so there is a constant need for this vitamin. It is required by the body to use oxygen and the metabolism of amino acids, fatty acids, and carbohydrates. Riboflavin is further needed to activate vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), helps to create niacin and assists the adrenal gland. It may be used for red blood cell formation, antibody production, cell respiration, and growth. Riboflavin is used for preventing low levels of riboflavin (riboflavin deficiency), cervical cancer, and migraineheadaches. It is also used for treating riboflavin deficiency, acne, muscle cramps, burning feet syndrome, carpal tunnel syndrome, and blood disorders such as congenital methemoglobinemia and red blood cell aplasia. Some people use riboflavin for eye conditions including eye fatigue, cataracts, and glaucoma.

    Other uses include increasing energy levels; boosting immune system function; maintaining healthy hair, skin, mucous membranes, and nails; slowing aging; boosting athletic performance; promoting healthy reproductive function; canker sores; memory loss, including Alzheimer's disease; ulcers; burns; alcoholism; liver disease; sickle cellanemia; and treating lactic acidosis brought on by treatment with a class of AIDS medications called NRTI drugs.

    Vitamin B3 (Niacin)

    Niacin also called nicotinic acid, niacinamide or nicotinic acid and referred to as vitamin B 3, which can be manufactured by the body. Niacin is derived from two compounds - nicotinic acid and niacinamide. Vitamin B3 is required for cell respiration, helps in the release of energy and metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, proper circulation and healthy skin, functioning of the nervous system, and normal secretion of bile and stomach fluids. It is used in the synthesis of sex hormones, treating schizophrenia and other mental illnesses, and a memory-enhancer.

    Vitamin D2 (Ergosterol)

    Ergosterol is a biological precursor (a provitamin) to vitamin D2. It is turned into viosterol by ultraviolet light, and is then converted into ergocalciferol, a form of vitamin D also known as D2 or D2.[1] For this reason, when yeast (such as brewer's yeast) and fungi (such as mushrooms), are exposed to ultraviolet light, significant amounts of vitamin D2 are produced.

    Because ergosterol is present in cell membranes of fungi yet absent in those of animals, it is a useful target for antifungal drugs. Ergosterol is also present in the cell membranes of some protists, such as trypanosomes. The three major human diseases caused by trypanosomatids are; African trypanosomiasis (Sleeping Sickness, caused by Trypanosoma brucei), South American trypanosomiasis (Chagas Disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi), and leishmaniasis (a set of trypanosomal diseases caused by various species of Leishmania). This is the basis for the use of some antifungals against West African sleeping sickness.

    Vitamin K

    Vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin, so your body stores it in fat tissue and the liver. What can high-vitamin K foods do for you?

    • Allow your blood to clot normally • Help protect your bones from fracture • Help prevent postmenopausal bone loss • Help prevent calcification of your arteries • Provide possible protection against liver and prostate cancer

    Zinc

    Zinc is a metal. It is called an “essential trace element” because very small amounts of zinc are necessary for human health.

    Zinc is used for treatment and prevention of zinc deficiency and its consequences, including stunted growth and acute diarrhea in children, and slow wound healing.

    It is also used for boosting the immune system, treating the common cold and recurrent ear infections, and preventing lower respiratory infections. It is also used for malaria and other diseases caused by parasites.

    Some people use zinc for an eye disease called macular degeneration, for night blindness, and for cataracts. It is also used for asthma; diabetes; high blood pressure; acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS); and skin conditions such as psoriasis, eczema, and acne.

    Other uses include treating attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), blunted sense of taste (hypogeusia), ringing in the ears (tinnitus), severe head injuries, Crohn’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Down syndrome, Hansen’s disease, ulcerative colitis, peptic ulcers and promoting weight gain in people with eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa.

    Some people use zinc for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), male infertility, erectile dysfunction (ED), weak bones (osteoporosis), rheumatoid arthritis, and muscle cramps associated with liver disease. It is also used for sickle cell disease and inherited disorders such as acrodermatitis enteropathica, thalassemia, and Wilson’s disease.

    Some athletes use zinc for improving athletic performance and strength.

    Zinc is also applied to the skin for treating acne, aging skin, herpes simplex infections, and to speed wound healing.

    The following are purported uses of the Chaga Mushroom:

    • Anti-aging

    • Anti-allergic

    • Anti-bacterial

    • Anti-Cancer

    • Anti-genotoxicity

    • Anti-inflammatory

    • Anti-microbial

    • Anti-mutagenic

    • Anti-oxidant

    • Anti-tumor

    • Anti-viral

    • Arthritis

    • Asthma

    • Bacterial Diseases

    • Blood Pressure High (Hypertension)

    • Blood Pressure Low (Hypotension)

    • Blood Purification

    • Bronchitis

    • Candidiasis (yeast)

    • Cardio-Vascular

    • Crohn’s Disease (CD)

    • Diabetes

    • Fungal Growth

    • Gastritis

    • Heart Disease

    • Hepatoprotective

    • HIV

    • Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

    • Immune Support / Enhancer

    • Influenza

    • Intestinal Worms

    • Kidney Tonic

    • Lower Cholesterol

    • Liver / Hepatitis

    • Pain Relief

    • Parasites

    • Parotid gland

    • Pulmonary Diseases

    • Skin Ailments

    • Stomach Ailments

    • Stomach Disease

    • Tuberculosis

    • Ulcerative Colitis (UC)

    CANADA- If you're from anyplace in Canada, contact our distributor in Winnipeg,Manitoba to save on shipping charges and/or customs fees. Contact:

    gbryson14@shaw.ca

    Chaga Products in Manitoba Canada

    (For French Speaking Customers) Pour l'appel parlant français Jim in New Brunswick Canada 506-735-6103

    New Brunswick Canada For specialty Teas and Chaga products contact "Quiet Sitting Teas" jolenecleland@yahoo.com
    If I was born in Kenya, I'd be President by now.

    *My fingers are slysdexic. Damn.*
    They're, there, their. There. I know the difference. My mind is miles and miles of thought ahead of my fingers and my fingers are peons. peons do sh!tty work.:D

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    A rough neighborhood in Hell.
    Posts
    6,475
    .. Sorry to spam this thread.. does anyone have any or can harvest some local Reishi mushroom? Gandoderma Lucidem? I have chaga, turkey tail, birch polypore, and fomes fomentaris (horse hoof) and would love to trade for some wild caught reishi! If you'd jsut like to try some of mine I could probably send you a sample even if you dont have reishi.. I'm happy to share! But wouldsure love to get some reishi and my info says it doesnt do this far north. I searched on craigslist in a few southern cities and couldnt find anyone listing it. Anyways, any help would be greatly appreciated! I am very interested in its properties!
    If I was born in Kenya, I'd be President by now.

    *My fingers are slysdexic. Damn.*
    They're, there, their. There. I know the difference. My mind is miles and miles of thought ahead of my fingers and my fingers are peons. peons do sh!tty work.:D

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Central Iowa
    Posts
    12,199
    Quote Originally Posted by BadMedicine View Post
    .. Sorry to spam this thread.. does anyone have any or can harvest some local Reishi mushroom? Gandoderma Lucidem? I have chaga, turkey tail, birch polypore, and fomes fomentaris (horse hoof) and would love to trade for some wild caught reishi! If you'd jsut like to try some of mine I could probably send you a sample even if you dont have reishi.. I'm happy to share! But wouldsure love to get some reishi and my info says it doesnt do this far north. I searched on craigslist in a few southern cities and couldnt find anyone listing it. Anyways, any help would be greatly appreciated! I am very interested in its properties!
    It depends on the forest enviroment, I've harvested some up on the Minnesota/Canadian border at the base of a maple tree, back round 2002 or so.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    4,888
    Originally posted by Satanta:
    "I'm probly too far South to get any"


    Dang, I know what ya mean. Me too.
    Be ALERT We need more Lerts

    Right now I'm having amnesia and deja vu at the same time. I think I've forgotten this before.

  24. #24
    I went to grannys kitchen looking for the kombucha thread and couldn't find one. I would appreciate a link if you have a moment.
    Dont tread on me!!!!!!!!!!!

  25. #25

    Michigan Mushroom Hunters club

    Quote Originally Posted by Loon View Post

    Do you ever get scared of what you find and eat? How can I get over this? I'm sure I have a lot of good fungi growing in the woods going to waste. You could come here and hunt all you want and teach me.
    You can join this group and go on their guided hunts, I plan on joining this year myself.
    http://michiganmushroomhunters.org/

    Last year I did a bunch of fall hunting and found a huge maitake stand, bunches of turkey tail, tons of slippery jacks and boletes, shaggy manes and of course puffballs. I also harvested and made tea from some of the birch polypores mentioned above which also concentrate the betulinic acid (just to a lesser degree than the chaga).

  26. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by BadMedicine View Post
    .. Sorry to spam this thread.. does anyone have any or can harvest some local Reishi mushroom? Gandoderma Lucidem? I have chaga, turkey tail, birch polypore, and fomes fomentaris (horse hoof) and would love to trade for some wild caught reishi! If you'd jsut like to try some of mine I could probably send you a sample even if you dont have reishi.. I'm happy to share! But wouldsure love to get some reishi and my info says it doesnt do this far north. I searched on craigslist in a few southern cities and couldnt find anyone listing it. Anyways, any help would be greatly appreciated! I am very interested in its properties!
    IMHO get some growing kit and grow your own reishi . Kits can be had for around 30 bucks I think and you should be able to control the growing environment some.

  27. #27

    Commercial products available.

    Swanson vitamins does sell what appears to be a reputable line of products based upon the chaga mushroom. Though I have never tried them myself I might suggest them to someone suffering from an illness. I live in the thumb of Michigan and have yet to find the chaga despite efforts to. I have also looked around the grayling area and no luck yet. It is my goal to find it! In the meantime birch polypore is the next best thing IMHO

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