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Canning Bacon
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Thread: Canning Bacon

  1. #1
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    Canning Bacon

    http://akhomesteaders.proboards44.co...lay&thread=289

    FAIR USE FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES ONLY:

    A few years ago, I ran across several sites that told how to can bacon. All the sites had exactly the same wording, so I don't know where the recipe originated, nor if it is "approved" by the FDA as safe. I have varied the instructions a little to make it easier and less messy, but it works and keeps just as well. In fact, I think it cooks up better.

    I use wide mouth quart canning jars.

    It takes a little over a pound of bacon for each jar.

    You'll need some parchment paper. I found it at the grocery store in the section with foil, plastic wrap, etc.

    Prepare the jars and lids as you would for canning anything else --- Wash and boil the jars to sterilize. Bring the bands and lids to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes. Keep everything in hot water until ready to use. This is from my memory, so go by the instructions in a canning book if this isn't exactly right.

    Pull off about 3 or 4 feet of parchment paper. Depending on the width, I usually cut mine in half lengthwise. You're going to roll the bacon slices up in the paper and put them in the jar, so you want the paper about as wide as the jar is tall. I found that it doesn't really matter if the paper is a little too short or too long. To be honest, I think you could just stuff the bacon in the jars without the paper and it would be fine. You just wouldn't have nice slices when you're cooking it. But, I'll tell you about cooking it later.

    I also found that it works better to cut the bacon to about the same length as the jar is tall so that it fits to about 1" below the rim. You can hold a stick, string, ruler, slice of bacon, or whatever you want to use as a guide for cutting your bacon. After the first few, you won't need it. You'll be able to just eyeball it. It doesn't have to be exact, but if it's too long, you'll end up wasting space stuffing ends in the jar. You'll get more bacon in each jar if they fit better.

    OK, here's my method:
    1. Prepare the jars and lids.
    2. Get your parchment paper ready.
    3. Trim bacon ends (or do this as you go, if you prefer)
    4. Starting at one end of the parchment paper, lay a strip of bacon across it, roll it, add another strip, roll, and keep going. I ended up laying out strip after strip of bacon, with a little space in between, then rolling it up that way. If your paper is too short, just add another in by overlapping a little.
    5. When your roll is about the same size as the jar opening, either continue wrapping the rest of the paper around, or cut it off. For my last jar, I end up adding piece after piece of leftover paper.
    6. Now, just stuff your bacon roll in the jar. That's it. When they're all full, wipe the rims clean, put the lids and bands on the jars and can them.
    7. Process in a pressure canner for 90 minutes at 10 pounds of pressure. Check a canning book if you are in the higher elevations.

    As I'm rolling the bacon, I use up my ends. You may prefer to use them separately for bacon bits or something.

    When you're ready to use the bacon, the entire roll will come out at once, but it is a little messy. I have a metal bowl ready to put the paper in. There will be liquid left in the jar. Over a skillet, I just start unrolling the bacon. Fry it up as usual. This cooks differently than fresh bacon. It does get crisp, but it rarely stays in nice long strips. It sort of crumbles as you cook. That's why I said that I don't know if it really matters about rolling it up in the paper, as you're not going to really have strips when your fry it. It does stay in larger pieces than just crumbles, though. If you don't want it crisp, it is more likely to stay in strips. Since it's already cooked, you just need enough cooking to make sure it's safe to eat. I would think it would be fine with all the salt, but I don't eat it without lots of cooking, just to be safe. Since we don't have electricity or refrigeration, it's really nice to open a jar of bacon in the middle of the summer. This is a treat that we never had before. We sometimes used to buy canned bacon from Costco. I think it was from Hungary. Pretty good, but very salty, and expensive. But, it fried up more like regular bacon than this. I haven't seen it around in years. Just as well. This is much cheaper, but bacon isn't healthy anyway. Just a treat we enjoy once in a while.

    The instructions I've found online are a little different. I tried this, but didn't like it. In my opinion, it's extra work, much messier, more cleaning up, and the bacon ends up falling apart even more when you cook it.
    But here's what they say: Prepare the jars and paper, but don't trim the bacon. Lay the bacon on a baking pan and pre-cook in a 350 degree oven until the strips are about 2/3 their original length. Don't cook until crisp or they will crumble when you're canning. Then place the limp (and dripping) bacon on the paper as I told you about earlier. Roll it up and place it in the jars. Pour the grease from the bacon into the jars. Do not fill more than 2/3 full of grease. Process at 10 pounds of pressure for 90 minutes. Higher elevations should use 11 pounds of pressure. (But, if memory serves me, I think you would use more pressure if you are really high, but can't remember for sure. Check a book.)

    Again, I don't think this is approved by the FDA, and this is just for informational purposes. I'm not suggesting that anyone else do this. It may not be safe, so you should check with the U.S. extension office for FDA information before canning anything. I'm just passing on what we have done.

    Oh, forgot to tell you about the paper. Lots of the grease will stick to the parchment paper as you unroll it. You could just throw it away, but I put it in a metal bowl, then set it on the warming shelf of the woodburnig cookstove, or on the cooler side. The grease will melt off. Then I carefully squeeze the melted grease into the bowl and pour it back into the bacon jar. I use the grease when I cook beans for extra flavor. I know. Not healthy, but it is ever so tasty!

    ------------------
    I am getting ready to do this. there must be 10 packages of bacon in the freezer and I'd rather have the room and some bacon put away for when TSHTF.
    Thus let me live, unseen, unknown; thus unlamented let me die; steal from the world, and not a stone tell where I lie.

    The best place to be in the event of a nuclear explosion is anywhere you can say: "what the hell was that!?!"
    ><>
    Tolerance is the virtue of the man without convictions.

    Men are NOT interested in what God has to say - but what they would rather believe themselves (shamelessly stolen from INVAR).
    <><
    "...no one can jump into the arms of God.
    Oh, no. You have to fall."



  2. #2
    I'll bring the expresso machine.

  3. #3
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    Are you putting the bacon in the jars raw versus precooked?
    Deemy

  4. #4
    depending on where you live, there is a store in my area (Aldi) that sells precooked bacon that is shelf stable. Doesn't need to be refrigerated unless it's opened.

    It is a 15 slice package (just like uncooked bacon), requires only a couple seconds on the stove or in microwave to heat and it's cheaper than uncooked bacon.

    It's shelf life is unlimited (i've looked EVERYWHERE on the package for a use by date). I am buying that to store rather than trying to can or buying canned bacon.

    The brand they sell is Roseland. I'm sure that's just the name they sell it under, but if you can find it, I recommend it. It's a nice bacon with a good favor. The only drawback is, you don't get the grease if you want it.

  5. #5
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    Deemy, this is an article I found. I'm just going to try it. I have part of the experiment done already, I have four pint jars, 2 of bacon pieces and 2 of strips-all cooked already. I heated the cooked bacon up and melted lard, put the bacon loose in the jars and poured in the hot lard, wiped rims and put on hot lids. Put them in the oven for a while at 200. and took them out. NOT pressure canned. The theory is that the lard and no air can get to the bacon so it should be just fine.

    Next I am going to try the parchment thing in the article and pressure can those.
    I've gotten the canned Yoder bacon and that article description looks to me like what they did to can that Yoder bacon. The Yoders comes out of the can in parchment, some grease, not much at all. It appears partially cooked-kinda floppy and very slightly browned. You have to cook it just a little.
    I dont know that I want to home can it raw, but I guess you could because you can can pork, bacon is pork, too.
    Thus let me live, unseen, unknown; thus unlamented let me die; steal from the world, and not a stone tell where I lie.

    The best place to be in the event of a nuclear explosion is anywhere you can say: "what the hell was that!?!"
    ><>
    Tolerance is the virtue of the man without convictions.

    Men are NOT interested in what God has to say - but what they would rather believe themselves (shamelessly stolen from INVAR).
    <><
    "...no one can jump into the arms of God.
    Oh, no. You have to fall."



  6. #6
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    I was wondering about this, because I really don't want to have to invest in Yoder, and I don't mind the work. Bacon isn't expensive around here. I can get it for about a buck a pound.

  7. #7
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    SO...... How did it go?? witch way was best???
    I've got my duck taped now what???
    God Bless
    MawMaw

  8. #8
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    Yeah, how'd it go??? You survive the taste test? Which one did choosy moms perfer?
    Now the Lord is that Spirit: and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is Liberty. II Cor. 3:17

  9. #9
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    We tried the shelf stable bacon for the convenience, but it has a funny taste. Make sure you like it before you buy alot. To me it tasted like it had chemicals added to it.

    I've tried the big bag of bacon bits at Sams Club, but it's horrible. It've very dry and has huge chunks that are too hard to bite into. I've discovered the Kroger brand of real bacon bits taste really good. Better than any name brand. They are softer and taste more like regular bacon and not like they had smoke flavoring added.

    Other than the luxury bags of bacon bits, we're just buying lots of smoked spam. Cut REALLY thin and fried until crisp, it makes a really good bacon substitute.

    xr

  10. #10
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    Well, I'm starting the bacon cooking tonight doing the parchment method. I already have crumbled bacon in jars with lard-some of them wouldnt stay under so I am going to open them, pull out whats sticking out, fill in the hole and then melt them in the oven and then pressure can those too, with the strips. I am going to do both kinds of strips-raw pack and cooked along with the larded pieces.
    My neighbor lucked out and got me 15 pounds of Daileys bacon from her friend whose parents have a restaurant-28$ What a buy! That is the best bacon I ever had. Our IGA just started carryin it-6.98$ a lb! GAH!

    All I gotta say is: BE KIND. This will be the first time I ever pressure canned anything and its making me a nervous wreck.
    Thus let me live, unseen, unknown; thus unlamented let me die; steal from the world, and not a stone tell where I lie.

    The best place to be in the event of a nuclear explosion is anywhere you can say: "what the hell was that!?!"
    ><>
    Tolerance is the virtue of the man without convictions.

    Men are NOT interested in what God has to say - but what they would rather believe themselves (shamelessly stolen from INVAR).
    <><
    "...no one can jump into the arms of God.
    Oh, no. You have to fall."



  11. #11
    I couldn't resist. I had to try my hand at canning bacon, I already had the pressure canner set up for something else. As directed by WW, I took 3 or 4 feet of parchment paper cut in half lengthwise, one pound of bacon (it was on sale) and a wide mouth quart jar. I cut the package of bacon in half and started placing the half length pieces on the parchment paper, rolling it up as I went along. One pound of bacon wrapped I this manner fits beautifully in the quart jar. Since I live at the 3000 ft level, I canned it at 15 lbs at 90 minutes. After waiting a week (that was the dificult part), I opened the jar and pulled out the bacon wrapped in parchment paper, slowly unrolled it and fried it up. I fed it to my DH this morning. No coments either way. When I informed him that it was the bacon I had canned, "Can more!" was his response. I did use thick cut bacon. Hopefully it is still on sale.

  12. #12
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    Thanks for the report, MaryLu. Can you tell us about the texture of the finished product? Sounds too easy not to try!

  13. #13
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    You wrapped the bacon uncooked in wax paper and presuure canned it . Right???? Been wanting to try this but wasn't sure if it had to be cooked or not.I have already bought Yoder's and liked it but a bit expensive for me.
    Deemy

  14. #14
    Deemy: Wax paper and Parchment paper are 2 differents types of paper. Don't use Wax Paper. I have canned bacon before and we like it. And if you are using raw bacon it cooks during that 90 min. just like anyother meat that is pressure canned.

  15. #15
    The texture is a little different. I needed to crisp it up on a lower temp than I usually cook it at. I had to use a spatula to turn it instead of a fork as I am used to doing. However when done, just a little more crumbly, husband said it just melted in his mouth (he liked it that way).

  16. #16
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    I guess I'd better tell you all what happened to mine. And double yes on the PARCHMENT paper, wax would not be good.
    I had never pressured canned anything in my life. I have an american canner with the metal to metal seal. I DID read all the directions, but somehow missed the one that talked about the lid arrow is supposed to go at the mark on the pot part. I did pretty much as Mary Lu except for cutting the bacon in half part. THAT would have made the whole thing so much easier. DOH!

    I wrestled and rassled with the things to get them all rolled up and into the jars. I had two sets of jars, each set consisted of one 12 oz jar and one quart jar. Each qt jar was wide mouth and the 12s were the regular mouth. One set was precooked bacon, one set was raw bacon. The cooked was hard to get to behave because it was cooked. I should have just partially cooked it and left off cooking while it was still limp. The raw behaved okay, I was cutting a piece of the tops of them because they were too long.

    I Put in the required amount of water, started up the pressure cooker with trepidation and got the jars in, 4 was not enough to hold them down, and they kept trying to float so I jammed in two little pint jars to help hold them down. Didnt work very well. And let er rip. Well, the was steam coming out of both the handle areas, but I was getting the rattle from the pressure jiggler thing at the proper rate so I thought I was good to go. There was about 3/4 of an hour to go, so I went outside with the dog and stayed a little too long and when I came back inside-NO MORE STEAM and a disaster was about to happen to my precious very expensive canner! Boiled dry and it still had 20 minutes to go. Sigh.

    Turned it off and let it cool and when I was trying to get the lid off is when I discovered that There were MARKS for where the lid was supposed to go on. Wasnt where I had it. No wonder it boiled dry. Well, I took the jars out, put them in the fridge until the next day when I had more time to deal with it. did it all over again, took the jars out of fridge an hour before I started and boiled them for a few minutes to get them up to temp before putting the lid on and did the lid properly (it fit better, too) this time and NO MORE water escaping from the handle areas and the jiggler working fine and did the 90 minutes all over again. They sealed okay. Theres a small amount of fluid/grease around in the ones that were raw, not much in the ones that were cooked. I left them sit in the other room for a week and now I have the jars sitting in another spot in the dark and will decant them sometime when I think it might be good to try them. They may be terribly overcooked by now since I had to do them twice but now I have it under my belt, I will definately do some more and have a good idea of what to do.

    If Yoders can can bacon in a can, then we should be able to do it, too. You do need wide mouth jars, its just easier to put them in and you can get in a lot more. I did notice that the raw quart jars contents had shrunken somewhat, it was very filled and afterwards it was not as tight in there.

    You have no idea how harrowing this is for me, my mother blew up a pressure cooker when I was little and all I remember is the big explosion and stuff all over the kitchen and it blew the lid off. Phew!
    Thus let me live, unseen, unknown; thus unlamented let me die; steal from the world, and not a stone tell where I lie.

    The best place to be in the event of a nuclear explosion is anywhere you can say: "what the hell was that!?!"
    ><>
    Tolerance is the virtue of the man without convictions.

    Men are NOT interested in what God has to say - but what they would rather believe themselves (shamelessly stolen from INVAR).
    <><
    "...no one can jump into the arms of God.
    Oh, no. You have to fall."



  17. #17
    WW... you're doing fine. BUT... please, until you're a lot more sure of what you're doing, DO NOT leave the house while that thing is cooking!

    You don't need to sit next to the stove and babysit it, but it really is a good idea (I'd say "important", but after 30+ years of pressure canning, I will admit that I do occasionally run out to the barn to help with something while I'm canning.. but after one near- disaster (got sidetracked when a cow got tangled up, and "20 minutes" turned into "45 minutes plus") I now wear one of those timers around my neck if I leave the room, much less go out.

    And for sure, you shouldn't have any steam releasing from anywhere except through the various vent holes in the lid! That's an interesting tidbit, though, because my two All American canners DO have those "arrows", etc... but it doesn't seem to make any difference if I line them up or not, as long as I can tighten down all the screw handles evenly.

    And that's one tip I don't remember if it's in the manual or not: tighten down your handles TWO at a time... opposite each other. In other words, if there are 6 handles (can't remember and I'm too lazy to run downstairs to my storage area to count now!) don't start at #1 and go AROUND the lid tightening them... it tends to make the lid tip a bit, and doesn't work very well. Instead, tighten #1 and #3, then #2 and #4... see what I mean?

    Now... I'm re-reading your post and wondering "how in the world are your jars FLOATING?"!! You use 1 1/2 to 2 quarts of water in the bottom of the canner, and then put a rack in, right? No way they should be able to float in that amount of water.

    And you want SPACE around your jars (doesn't need to be MUCH space.. even a small fraction of an inch... just enough so the steam can circulate around them)... so I wouldn't try "jamming" some other jars in there. If necessary- never had to do this with a pressure canner, but water bath canners DO require it- fill some jars with water and cap them- good place to use used lids... and fill those empty spots with the jars of water... leaving at least a bit of space between them all.

    Gotta get out to the barn. If I've confused you more, tell me!

    Summerthyme

  18. #18
    I'm with Summerthyme on the be careful aspect. I do my pressure canning outside on my deck when the weather is coopertative. I have a propane camp stove that I use. There is not enought room on my kitchen stove for my pressure canner, it is much too tall, besides I have an old smooth top range. As far as floating, sounds as if you added a bit too much water. The jars do not need to be covered as you do in a water bath. You only need about 3 inches. Don't be discouraged!!!! Keep on trying, just safely!

    Mary Lu

    ps now what else is there around here I can can with that thing........

  19. #19
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    They were floating because I did not put anything IN the jars except the meat in parchment-no liquid at all and 1.5 inches of water ended up halfway up the sides of the canner-its one of the smaller ones. Thats all I can figure out-it had me puzzled because I thought they would be heavy enough to not float. I feel like such an idiot because the thing scares the daylights out of me. If I try things like beans when they come in I assume it would be better because theres going to be enough weight to the jars (with liquid in them) to keep them down.

    I'm wondering if I have to pack even MORE stuff in them next time and it wont be such a problem. The raw ones could take much more bacon than the cooked ones because it was raw, so not much more could have gone into those.

    I'm so unsure of some things just because I have never done it before. I can water bath can with my eyes shut practically, but this is far more important to learn because then one can really have meals and more important things like MEAT and Veggies, instead of just jelly and fruits.
    Thus let me live, unseen, unknown; thus unlamented let me die; steal from the world, and not a stone tell where I lie.

    The best place to be in the event of a nuclear explosion is anywhere you can say: "what the hell was that!?!"
    ><>
    Tolerance is the virtue of the man without convictions.

    Men are NOT interested in what God has to say - but what they would rather believe themselves (shamelessly stolen from INVAR).
    <><
    "...no one can jump into the arms of God.
    Oh, no. You have to fall."



  20. #20
    I ended up with a pound of bacon in each quart jar. Mine started to float a little when I put a sixth jar in raising the water level. I only put in about 2 to 3 inches, closer to 2, of water. Good luck.

  21. #21
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    bringing this back up to the top per necessity.

    I have a bunch of the bacon ends and pieces used for seasoning. can i just pack them into half pint jars raw and can them for an hour and a half?

  22. #22
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    This is just my experience with canning bacon. I took 1 and 1/2 lb per qt jar. I rolled it up in the wax paper and put it in the jar and canned it per instructions. When I went to get it out there was so much grease that it was an awful mess to get it out . I prefer to precook, roll in the wax paper and then freeze the slices. Was much easier for me and easier to get out just a couple slices at a time. If you all want to can it wonderful but not for me....I really loved the idea though and hope you have better luck with it than me.
    Deemy

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cag3db1rd View Post
    bringing this back up to the top per necessity.

    I have a bunch of the bacon ends and pieces used for seasoning. can i just pack them into half pint jars raw and can them for an hour and a half?
    This is the way we do our bacon, which we use for seasoning other foods. We also use the bacon ends/pieces, when they're on sale. The only problem I remember is, if you pack them very close to the top, seems the grease can get under the lid seal, and cause failure. We only fill about 2/3's full. This works great for a pot of beans or greens, dump in the bacon & grease.

    Still haven't tried canning fried or raw, with the wax paper. I was always afraid it would taste of the wax. One day, we'll have to try it.
    I don't always speak to Obama voters.
    But when I do, I ask for the large fries.

  24. #24
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    okay, i packed them raw into 8 oz jars and pressure canned them for 90 minutes (maybe a little overkill) and that was that. they kind of stratified the juice and grease, which looked okay to me. I'll keep an eye on them for a few weeks and tell you how it went.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Green Co. View Post
    Still haven't tried canning fried or raw, with the wax paper. I was always afraid it would taste of the wax. One day, we'll have to try it.
    Please remember, it's not WAX paper, it's PARCHMENT paper. No wax.

  26. #26
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    You're right...my bad. I used parchment paper for canning and used waxed when I froze the cooked bacon.
    Deemy

  27. #27
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    I'm so sorry; I started a new thread with the same title. I could've sworn I checked for relevant threads before I created it. Mods, please feel free to merge the thread I started with this one since they're on the same subject.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by meg View Post
    depending on where you live, there is a store in my area (Aldi) that sells precooked bacon that is shelf stable. Doesn't need to be refrigerated unless it's opened.
    This is what I Stock as well as the pre canned bacon. It really comes in handy and cooks up just fine.
    When fascism comes to America it will come across an unsecured border carrying a Koran.

  29. #29
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    well. that's that. I canned them up, and dh uncanned them into everything he cooked. LOL. I think I have a pint left. I guess I"ll be doing this again really soon.

  30. #30
    Update on 2009 Bacon Canning....... I found a case of bacon I canned some time ago. The date is 04/09, remember this thread. I tried it, not bad. My husband tells me it is on par with average breakfast bacon. It was a little difficult to brown in that it has a tendency to fall apart and I needed a spatula to turn it. All in all, quite good. Now I need to reread this post to find out how I did it, my memory s a little foggy in that regard.

  31. #31
    wow.......almost 9 years old!.........I don't have pressure cooker but good to know it's long term usage
    Sapphire

    myopically challenged

  32. #32
    I found the sausage links canned at the same time. They were the texture of Vienna sausages, not great but still tasted good. And on the plus side, I don't feel sick after eating them.

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